Is a Sustainability Career on Your Green Horizon?

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Woman engineer

In addition to being vital to many people, protecting the environment has become an important goal for many organizations.

A way to achieve this goal is to pursue sustainability, which is using resources to meet present needs without compromising future resources. Although sustainability most often is associated with environmental protection and conservation, it also has social and economic impacts. In fact, many companies adopt sustainability strategies to increase profits, and the environmental aspects become an added bonus.

Sustainability professionals help organizations achieve their goals by ensuring that their business practices are economically, socially, and environmentally sustainable. Sustainability is a diverse field that includes a wide variety of professionals. Sustainability professionals can be business managers, scientists, or engineers; or they can come from other backgrounds. Although their specific career paths might differ, sustainability professionals promote environmental protection, social responsibility, and profitability.

 

What is sustainability?

The most common definition of sustainability comes from a 1987 United Nations (UN) conference. In a report, the UN defined sustainable development as “development that meets the needs of the present without compromising the ability of future generations to meet their own needs.”

Alternately, according to a report from the National Association for Environmental Management, sustainability is “a term that describes a company’s strategies for acting as a responsible corporate citizen, ensuring its operations are financially sustainable and minimizing its environmental footprint. Sustainability initiatives may include natural resource reduction, supply chain management, worker safety and health initiatives, stakeholder engagement and external reporting.” External reporting involves reporting information on a company’s environmental and safety record to the general public, or to government agencies.

The environmental aspect of sustainability focuses on the goals of protecting the environment and the conservation of natural resources. To accomplish these goals, sustainability professionals help organizations, such as businesses, government agencies, and non-profits implement policies to manage the resources consumed and the waste generated by an organization. For example, a sustainability professional might suggest that an organization reduce the amount of packaging it uses when it ships its products, and a reduction in packaging could help the company decrease the amount of raw material it consumes and as the environmental cost of shipping products. Less material used in packaging would cut down on materials cost, as well as weight and space taken up during transport. Since the products would take up less space, there would be fewer shipments. Fewer shipments mean less energy used for shipping products, as well as lower emissions. For example, fewer shipments made by trucks would reduce fuel consumption and lower the amount of exhaust emitted into the air.

To fulfill sustainability’s social aspect, sustainability professionals attempt to minimize the negative effects and to promote the positive effects of the organization’s activities on stakeholders. Stakeholders are persons or groups, such as employees, customers, and citizens of surrounding communities, who have an interest in the organization and its activities. Sustainability professionals work to ensure that the workplace is healthy for employees and that the products or services the organization provides are safe for consumers to use. Some sustainability initiatives affect more than one stakeholder. Many companies promote corporate responsibility where they will provide pro bono products and services to the needy, or make attempts to lessen their environmental impact. For example, although many companies are required by law to keep emissions below a certain level, a sustainability professional might help a utility company lower its smokestack emissions to an even lower level than required. This additional reduction would benefit the health of workers and local citizens, as well as provide the company with positive publicity to entice new customers and retain current ones.

Sustainability can affect current and future profitability. Whether they work for private corporations, government agencies, or non-profits, sustainability professionals strive to ensure that the costs of implementing a sustainability program are worth the expected benefits. Because organizations would not knowingly implement sustainability policies that could cause them to become financially unsound, sustainability professionals help a company’s leaders understand the benefits of implementing such techniques, by explaining future cost savings. For example, energy-saving techniques, such as installing motion detectors and changing light bulbs require an upfront investment but result in future savings.

 

Sustainability issues facing companies today

Many organizations are implementing sustainability measures for a variety of reasons. Sustainability allows companies to increase profits, to manage risks, and to engage stakeholders, such as employees, the local community, and shareholders. By pursuing sustainability, many organizations are able to run more efficiently, improve corporate reputations, retain employees, and have a more positive impact on their communities. In addition, there are other benefits to practicing sustainability. These include minimizing the effects of rising costs for energy; complying with increased regulations at the federal, state, and local levels; and pleasing customers who expect organizations to be environmentally and socially responsible.

Prices for oil, natural gas, coal, and other energy sources have been volatile over the past several decades. Most prices have been on an upward trend with significant fluctuations. Experts believe that U.S. energy prices will continue to climb, because of a limited supply of energy sources (due to a wide range of factors) and increased demand from other countries, particularly China.

Increasing costs have led many firms to seek ways to cut back on the amount of energy used in everyday operations. Companies have been finding new ways to do more with less. This includes reducing the amount of energy used for production and other operations, in addition to finding alternative sources of energy. Alternatives include wind, solar, and biofuels (fuels derived from renewable sources, such as corn, grass, or algae).

Federal and state governments have been enacting climate change regulations. The U. S. Environmental Protection Agency has recently been granted the authority to regulate greenhouse gas emissions, and many states have enacted legislation to limit carbon emissions with the goal of reducing their carbon output. Companies in these states will be under increasing pressure to reduce their carbon footprint (the amount of carbon a company releases into the atmosphere) or face increased regulation and possible fines for their emissions.

Consumers are increasingly paying attention to companies’ environmental records. Consumers base decisions on products or services to purchase at least partially on environmental factors. Companies that have a positive environmental record can appeal to these environmentally sensitive consumers. In addition to consumers, many environmentally conscious businesses and other organizations prefer to work with, or purchase, goods or services from organizations that also are conscious of the environment. Thus, by implementing sustainability measures, companies will be able to appeal to more customers.

Concerns about corporate impact on the environment and local and global communities are being incorporated into strategic business decisions. Sustainability is becoming part of how companies do business in the United States, rather than being viewed as a cost.

 

Who are sustainability professionals?

A job in sustainability encompasses the concept of stewardship—the responsible management of resources. Sustainability professionals seek to improve an organization’s environmental, social, and economic impact. Some have specific titles such as sustainability manager and director of corporate responsibility. Sustainability professionals in other roles may have had experience as industrial managers, logistics (transportation, storage, and distribution) managers, environmental scientists, civil engineers, or recycling coordinators, among others. Many of these workers are dedicated to sustainability, but some may have sustainability responsibilities, in addition to their primary job duties. These workers might implement corporate recycling programs, install equipment to increase efficiency, and monitor processes to ensure their proper function.

There is no set career path for jobs in sustainability—jobs have varying responsibilities across different organizations. For many organizations, sustainability is ingrained in their cultures and is the responsibility of many employees. Thus, these organizations may not have dedicated sustainability staff, but still pursue sustainability.

Many large corporations, some non-profit organizations, and some government agencies employ sustainability professionals. Some organizations do not employ their own sustainability professionals, but still seek advice on sustainability practices. Such organizations frequently hire consultants from sustainability firms to offer specialized skills and services, as well as additional temporary manpower for specific projects.

The Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS) currently does not have data on the number of workers involved in sustainability activities. However, data on employment related to the use of environmentally friendly technologies and practices are available from the Green Technologies and Practices survey. Although many different workers may be involved in carrying out day-to-day sustainability operations, the BLS definition of a green job involved in green technologies and practices is one whose primary duty is related to the use of environmentally friendly production processes. Workers must spend more than half their time involved in researching, developing, maintaining, installing and/or using technologies or practices to lessen the environmental impact of their establishment, or in training other workers in these technologies and practices to be considered in a green job.

 

Management occupations

Sustainability managers come from diverse backgrounds, have different job titles, and perform a broad range of duties. Sustainability managers are responsible for developing and implementing an organization’s sustainability plans and presenting these plans to senior staff. They might also be responsible for ensuring that an organization is in compliance with environmental, health, and safety regulations. Many sustainability managers rely on their public relations and communications skills to work with concerned citizens in local communities.

 

Science occupations

Scientists who work in sustainability devise technical solutions for reducing waste and cutting costs. They assist in the development of strategies to increase safety and to reduce the risk of illness and injury for a company’s employees. Some scientists often serve as advisors to sustainability managers and are involved in performing research to minimize a company’s environmental impact. Many sustainability scientists also serve as consultants, working as technical experts at firms that specialize in providing sustainability services to companies that do not have their own sustainability staff, or those who need specialized knowledge to implement sustainability strategies. Many people with a science background move into management positions and become top-level decision makers in the business community. They use their technical knowledge to guide an organization toward more sustainable practices and are frequently promoted to top-level management positions.

Occupations in scientific research and development have become increasingly interdisciplinary, and as a result, it is common for biological scientists, chemists, materials scientists, and engineers to work together as part of a team. Most scientists work in an office or laboratory and also spend some time in manufacturing facilities with engineers and other specialists. Some scientists, such as environmental scientists or conservation scientists spend a large portion of their time working outdoors, studying the natural environment.

If the growth of sustainability continues, more organizations will employ sustainability professionals. The benefits of this growth should be noticeable in many sectors of U.S. industries, from services, such as finance and health care, to manufacturing and construction.

Sustainability professionals have a broad range of education and experience levels, mainly in science, engineering, and business management. Although many of the occupations with sustainability responsibilities require at least a bachelor’s degree, there are opportunities for individuals with a wide variety of work experience and knowledge.

As sustainability becomes more widespread, new opportunities to contribute to the field will arise. A new market focused on sustainability should build job prospects for more future workers.

 

Source: bls.gov/green/sustainability

How to Brand Yourself and Increase Your Chances of Getting Hired

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Professional Black Man Standing Outside the Office

Job seekers who want to break into a new role in 2019 need to think hard about the image (or brand) they project to employers. Building a strong professional brand that is aligned to the companies or industries you wish to work for will absolutely increase your chances of getting hired.

You need to assume that any recruiter that you approach is going to research you online, so you should have pillars in place that reinforce your skills, expertise and interest in your desired field.

Meanwhile, by branding yourself through online content and engagement, you may even draw an audience of followers, including recruiters who are interested in your profile.

How do you go about branding yourself? Here’s a three-step strategy to follow.

1.  Develop Your Own Website and Blog

If you want to brand yourself as an expert, you need a way to showcase your past work and current ideas. A website or blog is the perfect medium.

Just about every company uses a website as a central tool for brand-building. You should do the same.

Don’t worry, nowadays building your own website, with your own personalized URL, requires little to no technical knowledge. Wix, SquareSpace and WordPress are just a few the most popular platforms people use.

The advantage of having your own professional website is that it can house a wide range of content that is relevant to employers. Plus the site alone can be used as evidence of your skills: tech-savviness, eye for design, etc.

Having a website that includes a well-written bio and updated resume/CV will allow employers to find you online. Plus there is a growing trend of recruiters asking candidates for creative job applications. Sharing a link to a personal website where you customize content to a specific job type is bound to impress.

Having a blog integrated into your website can be a major boost to your professional brand. Through a blog, you have the opportunity to write about what matters to you and demonstrate your knowledge of particular issues in order to impress employers.

For example, if you are passionate about sustainable technology and your goal is to work in the field, then blog about it. Tap your thoughts and creativity and produce content on topics that are dear to you. Then, make sure you point employers to this content during the recruitment process.

DOs and DON’Ts of Creating a Personal Website/blog that Appeals to Recruiters

DOs

  • Set a clear focus niche for your blog based on your career goals
  • Produce timely, original content
  • Integrate with social media channels

DON’Ts

  • Get sloppy (strive for consistent design and error-free content)
  • Be too negative or political with blog posts
  • Forget to include contact info (phone, email, etc.)

2.  Harness Social Media

Social media has a bearing on your professional brand whether you like it or not.

The vast majority of recruiters screen candidates by searching them online and reviewing their social media profiles. What will they dig up on you?

You may not want to use social media for strategically positioning yourself as an expert in a specific field. But you absolutely will want to make sure that any of your active profiles don’t hurt your chances of getting hired.

At the very least, every job searcher should do their own audit of their social media channels and determine what content employers might see. Change your privacy settings if needed.

However, ensuring a clean online presence is the bare minimum that you can do using the power of social media. By embracing its many sharing and networking functions, you can cement yourself as a thought leader and get your message in front of those who make hiring decisions.

For example, social media gives you plenty of channels for sharing news and content from your website or blog. As mentioned above, integrating social media with a personal website or blog is a must as it allows you to promote your site to your network.

If you don’t have a blog or website, then you can still share your opinions through social media. Twitter, after all, is a micro-blogging platform, while LinkedIn is a common medium for self-publishing longer-form articles.

When you are totally immersed in a particular field, chances are you come across all kinds of interesting content that may be valuable to like-minded people. Share it!

Sharing content with your network by posting links to articles and videos is a way of proving you are engaged in specific issues. There is also the added benefit that if you share or comment on other people’s content, they will reciprocate or engage with you.

As a job seeker, following the companies you want to work for through their social media channels offers many opportunities to express your interest in them. You can essentially become a “superfan” of these companies by consistently commenting on or sharing their content.

The benefit of becoming a superfan is that you are always up to speed with what the company is doing, giving you in-depth knowledge of their operations. This knowledge can then be used to write an amazing cover letter or letter of interest, and you may rely on it during job interviews.

Of course, social media has also become a popular tool for soliciting jobs. The obvious example is LinkedIn where you can identify recruiters and connect with them directly. But identifying opportunities through Facebook and Twitter can also prove effective.

Regardless of the platform, when you connect with companies through social media, their first impression of you will be based on the brand you’ve built and expressed using your accounts.

DOs and DON’Ts of Professional Branding Through Social Media

DOs

  • Strive for consistency across social platforms (usernames, headshots, etc.)
  • Include your resume summary on your social profiles (especially for LinkedIn)
  • Share content that people in your target industry might find valuable
  • Join Facebook and LinkedIn groups relevant to your industry
  • Follow and comment on content from targeted employers
  • Reach out to recruiters to ask for informational interviews

DON’Ts

  • Use unprofessional usernames or photos
  • Forget to edit all content before posting
  • Be offended by critical comments from others – keep any responses professional
  • Spam online groups with your resume/CV
  • Comment on absolutely everything a company posts – give your replies substance
  • Ask recruiters for jobs through social media

3.  Engage Elsewhere

Having your own website and an active social media presence will help you get noticed amongst recruiters.

But if you want to go even further in establishing your name and building your professional brand, you can look for other engagement opportunities.

Your goal is to make it known to as many people as possible that you have something to offer: skills or expertise in a particular area.

Go to industry networking events in your field. Better yet, don’t just attend, see if you can participate in panel discussions or speaking opportunities.

Try to get published in industry publications, newspapers or online. Many media outlets crave well-informed content that expresses strong opinions about current issues. Be prepared to encounter some resistance from editors, but keep pitching your writing.

You can always resort to self-publishing on your blog, or other platforms that attract talented writers looking to express themselves, like Medium.com.

Continue on to novoresume.com to read the complete article.

Former School Custodian from Denver is Now the School Principal

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Michael Atkins School Principal

Michael Atkins, a former school custodian in Denver Colorado, has been recently promoted as the new principal of Stedman Elementary School. He plans to use his past experiences as a former student in the area and a custodian to become successful in accomplishing his goals in his new career.

As a child, Stedman Elementary had been a part of Atkins’ life. At one point, he was bused to Bromwell Elementary School where he met a second-grade teacher who “took the time and the opportunity to form a relationship that opened a door for me,” Atkins told 9 News.

But he had to separate ways with the teacher when he was bused to Hamilton Middle School. By then, he realized how black students like himself were treated differently even by some teachers.

“Just the different interactions that I had with the teachers, I had the social intelligence at that time to understand there were differences,” Atkins said. “Teachers telling me that I’ll be dead by the time I’m 21.”

By the time he could work, he had his first full-time job at Denver Public Schools at Rachel B. Noel Middle School. That was when he met his old second-grade teacher again and helped him get a job as a paraprofessional teacher.

Since then, he climbed up the ranks as he eventually became a teacher, then an assistant principal, and now a principal. He said that as a principal, he hopes to fix problems of racial disparity he experienced when he was a student before.

Continue on to Black News to read the complete article.

7 Ways You Should Never Answer “Why Should We Hire You?”

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woman looking confident in a job interview

The question comes up in nearly every interview. It might be phrased in any number of ways, but every interviewer is going to ask, in some form, why should we hire you?  The most important thing to remember when answering this question: Your answer should focus on how you can benefit the company and what you can offer your potential employer.There are plenty of right ways to answer this question, but there are even more ways you can get it wrong. We’ll walk you through all of them.

First things first — there are some things, though they may be true, you should never say in response to this question.

1. Because I need the job

This will do nothing to excite the hiring manager. It doesn’t illustrate any passion for the position or company — it doesn’t even express interest.

2. Because I want to move

You’re looking to make a move to a new city, but you have to have the job to make the move possible. This isn’t a great reason to hire someone, because it can make the company feel like it’s just filling a temporary purpose — to get you to your destination. While you should be honest about your intention to move, you shouldn’t use this as the reason why you want to work there.

3. Because I hate my current job

Badmouthing a past or current employer in a job interview is bad form. Saying you want a new job just to escape your old one might be true, but the interviewer doesn’t need to know that.

4. Because I want to make more money

Don’t we all? Let’s be honest. For many people, this is the reason they’d like a new job. But if you use pay as the reason why a company should hire you, its hiring managers could see you as a flight risk — the moment someone else offers you more money, you’re gone just as quickly as you came.

5. Because I can grow your business by 1,000%

Don’t answer by promising something you can’t deliver. Be realistic — you’ll have to make good on your word later.

6. Because I am [insert fluffy words not backed up by anything concrete]

Just about anyone in a job interview can say things like, “You should hire me because I’m a team player! I’m hardworking and creative.” So is everyone else. If you’re going to talk about “soft” skills and attributes, then be ready to back them up with anecdotes or metrics.

7. Because your company would look great on my resume

Companies are probably well aware of this — and it’s not a reason to hire a candidate. Remember to make your answer about what you can give the company, not what you hope to get from it.

5 good ways to answer, “Why should we hire you?”

1. Because I have something you won’t find in other candidates

Companies should hire you because you have a unique skill they need. Think beyond the basic job description — you and the other candidates likely tick all those boxes. You’ll need to bring a skill they didn’t even know they needed.
Let’s say you’re interviewing for a graphic design position. You check all the boxes on the job description and you have a killer portfolio‚ so the reason that company should hire you over anyone else should be one that makes you stand out. Maybe you have experience with JavaScript, maybe you’ve managed people and processes simultaneously, perhaps you have experience with large and recognizable companies. Give them something you’re sure they won’t get from another candidate.

2. Because I bring something unique to company culture

Hiring managers and recruiters want to make sure you’re a good fit for their company and team culture. Be clear and honest about how you would contribute to the office climate:
You should hire me because I see at this company a culture of excellence. I won’t work anywhere that I feel doesn’t have the same standards I do. I’m positive, forward-thinking, and at my last job, I led my team from disappointment to success.

3. Because I can solve a problem you have

You can really pique a hiring manager’s interest by solving a problem for them. It’s one fewer thing for them to worry about and something they can get excited about. If you can solve a problem for someone at the company, you likely have won a champion in the hiring process. You said your customer acquisition engine has stalled and your cost per lead is too high. You should hire me because I can solve this problem — I’ve done it before. At my last job, I lowered CPL by 42% in eight months.

4. Because I believe in your company mission

Companies that are highly mission-focused want to hire teams that back that mission, too. Explain why that mission matters to you and provide examples of how that mission has motivated you beyond your professional life.You should hire me because I, too, believe that all children should have access to high-quality education. I spend my free time working with at-risk youth to ensure they don’t fall behind on their schoolwork. I’ve done this for three years, and I understand the causes and unique problems these kids face.

5. Because I’m hungry to learn

<Let’s say you’re interviewing for a position that’s a step up from your current job; you should show your employer why you’re ready to take on more responsibility. You should hire me because I’ve been a product manager for four years with excellent success, and I’m hungry to take on more responsibility and grow in my career. I see so much potential for this role, and I would love the opportunity to step in as a manager and teach junior team members what I’ve learned and watch them grow, too.

Continue on to Yahoo News to read the complete article.

185 Powerful Action Verbs That Will Make Your Resume Awesome

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applicant is picked by hiring managers

Led… Handled… Managed… Responsible for… most resume bullet points start with the same words.

Frankly, the same tired old words hiring managers have heard over and over—to the point where they’ve lost a lot of their meaning and don’t do much to show off your accomplishments.

So, let’s get a little more creative, shall we? Next time you update your resume, switch up a few of those common words and phrases with strong, compelling action verbs that will catch hiring managers’ eyes.

No matter what duty or accomplishment you’re trying to show off, we’ve got just the resume action verb for you.

Check out the list below, and get ready to make your resume way more exciting.
 
 

You Led a Project

If you were in charge of a project or initiative from start to finish, skip “led” and instead try:

  1. Chaired
  2. Controlled
  3. Coordinated
  4. Executed
  5. Headed
  6. Operated
  7. Orchestrated
  8. Organized
  9. Oversaw
  10. Planned
  11. Produced
  12. Programmed

Action Verbs 13-33 You Envisioned and Brought a Project to Life

And if you actually developed, created, or introduced that project into your company? Try:

  1. Administered
  2. Built
  3. Charted
  4. Created
  5. Designed
  6. Developed
  7. Devised
  8. Founded
  9. Engineered
  10. Established
  11. Formalized
  12. Formed
  13. Formulated
  14. Implemented
  15. Incorporated
  16. Initiated
  17. Instituted
  18. Introduced
  19. Launched
  20. Pioneered
  21. Spearheaded

Action Verbs 34-42 You Saved the Company Time or Money

Hiring managers love candidates who’ve helped a team operate more efficiently or cost-effectively. To show just how much you saved, try:

  1. Conserved
  2. Consolidated
  3. Decreased
  4. Deducted
  5. Diagnosed
  6. Lessened
  7. Reconciled
  8. Reduced
  9. Yielded

Action Verbs 43-61 You Increased Efficiency, Sales, Revenue, or Customer Satisfaction

Along similar lines, if you can show that your work boosted the company’s numbers in some way, you’re bound to impress. In these cases, consider:

  1. Accelerated
  2. Achieved
  3. Advanced
  4. Amplified
  5. Boosted
  6. Capitalized
  7. Delivered
  8. Enhanced
  9. Expanded
  10. Expedited
  11. Furthered
  12. Gained
  13. Generated
  14. Improved
  15. Lifted
  16. Maximized
  17. Outpaced
  18. Stimulated
  19. Sustained

Action Verbs 62-87 You Changed or Improved Something

So, you brought your department’s invoicing system out of the Stone Age and onto the interwebs? Talk about the amazing changes you made at your office with these words:

  1. Centralized
  2. Clarified
  3. Converted
  4. Customized
  5. Influenced
  6. Integrated
  7. Merged
  8. Modified
  9. Overhauled
  10. Redesigned
  11. Refined
  12. Refocused
  13. Rehabilitated
  14. Remodeled
  15. Reorganized
  16. Replaced
  17. Restructured
  18. Revamped
  19. Revitalized
  20. Simplified
  21. Standardized
  22. Streamlined
  23. Strengthened
  24. Updated
  25. Upgraded
  26. Transformed

Action Verbs 88-107 You Managed a Team

Instead of reciting your management duties, like “Led a team…” or “Managed employees…” show what an inspirational leader you were with terms like:

  1. Aligned
  2. Cultivated
  3. Directed
  4. Enabled
  5. Facilitated
  6. Fostered
  7. Guided
  8. Hired
  9. Inspired
  10. Mentored
  11. Mobilized
  12. Motivated
  13. Recruited
  14. Regulated
  15. Shaped
  16. Supervised
  17. Taught
  18. Trained
  19. Unified
  20. United

Action Verbs 108-113 You Brought in Partners, Funding, or Resources

Were you “responsible for” a great new partner, sponsor, or source of funding? Try:

  1. Acquired
  2. Forged
  3. Navigated
  4. Negotiated
  5. Partnered
  6. Secured

Action Verbs 114-122 You Supported Customers

Because manning the phones or answering questions really means you’re advising customers and meeting their needs, use:

  1. Advised
  2. Advocated
  3. Arbitrated
  4. Coached
  5. Consulted
  6. Educated
  7. Fielded
  8. Informed
  9. Resolved

Continue on to The Muse to read the complete article.

Making Strides in Health Care—AMA elects its first African-American woman president

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Patrice A. Harris, MDposes outside the AMA

Atlanta-based psychiatrist Patrice A. Harris, MD, is the first black woman to become the American Medical Association’s (AMA) president. When Dr. Harris assumes her role in June this year, she will also be the Association’s first African-American female to hold that office.

“It will be my honor to represent the nation’s physicians at the forefront of discussions when policymaker and lawmakers search for practical solutions to the challenges in our nation’s health system. I am committed to preserving the central role of the physician-patient relationship in our healing art,” Dr. Harris said.

First elected to the AMA Board of Trustees in 2011, Dr. Harris has held the executive offices of AMA board secretary and AMA board chair. She will continue to serve as chair of the AMA Opioid Task Force and has been active on several other AMA task forces and committees on health information technology, payment and delivery reform, and private contracting. She has also chaired the influential AMA Council on Legislation and co-chaired the Women Physicians Congress.

Dr. Harris continues in private practice and consults with both public and private organizations on health service delivery and emerging trends in practice and health policy. She is an adjunct assistant professor in the Emory Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences.

Source: wire.ama-assn.org

Naval Veteran And Realtor Brings Number One Home Inspection Company To Norfolk

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Demetrius Payne posing in front of his Home Inspection van

(NORFOLK, VA)- Demetrius Payne knows how to use his expertise and skills. After serving in the Navy for 10 years, he then went on to operate a testing facility for aircraft carriers and submarines for 11 years! Interesting background to say the least, but practical Payne decided to become a licensed Realtor a year ago. In September he added a Pillar To Post Home Inspectors® franchise and training to round out the tremendous services he can offer home buyers and sellers.

Payne serves homebuyers and sellers throughout Virginia Beach, Norfolk, Portsmouth, Chesapeake, Suffolk, Isle of Wight, Southampton and Franklin City. The franchise brand is a favorite among veterans such as Payne. Pillar To Post Home Inspectors is a member of VetFran, a program of the International Franchise Association that helps vets purchase franchises and it has achieved 5-star status in that program, the top ranking possible. In 2018, one-third of new Pillar To Post Home Inspectors franchisees were military vets. “I was impressed by the level of commitment Pillar To Post Home Inspectors makes to its franchisees,” Payne said. “My previous careers have taught me leadership, professionalism and customer service skills. My real estate experience helps me understand the ins and outs of homes.”

Pillar To Post Home Inspectors, is the brand to which more than three million families have turned to for 25 years to be their trusted advisor when buying or selling a home. Consistently ranked as the top-rated home inspection company on Entrepreneur Magazine’s annual Franchise500®, Pillar To Post Home Inspectors is enjoying its 19th year in a row on that list.

A professional evaluation both inside and outside the home is at the core of Pillar To Post Home Inspectors’ service. Pillar To Post Home Inspectors input data and digital photos into a computerized report that is printed and presented on site. All information is provided to clients in a customized binder for easy reference, allowing homebuyers or sellers to make confident, informed decisions.

For more information visit: demetriuspayne.pillartopost.com or call 757-234-8566.

About Pillar To Post Home Inspectors®
Founded in 1994, Pillar To Post Home Inspectors is the largest home inspection company in North America with home offices in Toronto and Tampa. There are nearly 600 franchises located in 49 states and nine Canadian provinces. The company has been named as Best in Category in Entrepreneur Magazine’s Franchise500® ranking for 19 years in a row. Long-term plans include adding 500 to 600 new franchisees over the next five years. For further information, please visit pillartopostfranchise.com.

The Right Way to Follow Up After a Career Fair (Email Template Included!)

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Career fair attendees walking to event

By Greg Ott

When you show up to a career fair, they just give you a job, right? If only it were that easy. While career fairs serve up great introductions to companies, recruiters, and career paths you may choose to follow, it’s still on you to leave a lasting impression that inches you ever-so-closer to landing a real interview—and a great job.

Being prepared and asking the right questions will help you stand out during the event itself. But when the career fair is over, don’t forget to send a proper follow-up email, too.

After all, recruiters attending career fairs often end up meeting dozens of quality candidates—and it might be weeks or even months before they actually fill an open role or internship position. A great thank you email not only highlights your interest in the company and demonstrates good business etiquette, it ensures you stick in the recruiter’s mind.

So what do you say to make yourself memorable? Use these super easy tips to craft a perfect career fair follow-up email. We’ve even got a template you’re free to copy and paste, along with an example!

Connect Quickly
Aim to send your career fair follow-up email within 24 hours of the event. Why? Recruiters are perpetually inundated with email and don’t always have time to respond to every connection or follow up. That’s especially true after a career fair ends. Typically, it takes a couple of days for a recruiter to sit down and sort through the mountain of messages they received as a result of the event.

But if you can make it into the first batch of emails to hit the recruiter’s inbox, you’ll have a better chance of staying top-of-mind as the recruiter starts connecting with candidates—and even more so when weighed against those who chose not to follow up at all.

Keep It Simple—and Short
There’s no need to reinvent the wheel here. As with any great thank you note, you should simply thank the recruiter for their time and express a desire to connect down the line. The recruiter should already have your resume, so there’s no need to attach it, says Muse Career Coach Victoria Morell, Associate Director of Miami University Farmer School of Business Careers—though if you’re worried and want to attach it anyway, it won’t hurt.

“Keep it light, nice, short, and to the point, but include something that makes them remember you or read a little bit further,” Morell adds. Referring to a personal connection from your meeting, such as a common hobby or interest you discussed, can help remind the recruiter of your initial encounter.

Be Professional
Even though it’s just a brief thank you email, that doesn’t mean it’s an opportunity to act casual. Pay attention to the tone of your email so you don’t seem flippant, nonchalant, or unprepared for a professional work environment.

For instance, don’t open your message with a casual greeting like “hey”—always choose a proper introduction, like “hi” or “hello,” to set a courteous and professional tone. It also doesn’t hurt to err on the side of formality in how you address the recruiter—think “Mr. or Ms. [Name],” rather than a first name, unless you know for sure that the company is super casual.

“At this stage in the recruitment process, you’re still trying to impress them,” notes Morell, likening the tone of a thank you email to a job interview. “Even if you know it’s a casual dress code, you’re still going to dress well for the interview to show you’re serious.”

Try this email template to put it all into practice:

The Template
Hello [Name of Recruiter],

Thanks again for the opportunity to meet you at the [name/location of career fair] on [date]! [Personal detail.]

It was great learning about [detail from meeting], and I believe my [relevant, personal experience] would make me a great fit for [Company].

I would love to connect regarding a potential career with [Company] and look forward to hearing from you in the future.

Thanks again for your time!

Best,
[Your Name]

Continue on to The Muse to read the complete article.

Everything You Ever Wanted to Know About How Commission Works—Because Money Matters

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woman working on a calculator

Commission can be a confusing topic for anyone, whether you’re great with money or not. Maybe you’re considering a job with a commission structure or are currently in a field where commission is a big chunk of your compensation.

If you’re not sure how it all works in the business world, we’ll break down the concept so you come out a little wiser than you were before.

What Is Commission?

Commission is additional compensation that’s earned based on job performance. When you agree to a commission-based role or commission structure (often by signing an agreement), you agree to be paid a certain amount of money that’s dependent on hitting some goal—goods sold, meetings closed, hires placed, to name a few examples.

What Kinds of Jobs Work Under a Commission Structure?

When you think of commission, your mind immediately goes to a sales-type role (think of a retail salesperson trying to get you to buy that extra pair of jeans). Commission is popular in most sales jobs because their responsibilities are heavily tied to a company’s revenue goals. Having the opportunity to earn commission—sometimes a hefty amount—motivates those individuals to hit or get close to their quarterly or yearly goals.

But commission can pop up in other places, too. In recruiting, you’re often provided a commission on each candidate you successfully place—usually a percentage of their annual salary. As an account manager, you can earn commission on clients you upsell or renew for the year. And in real estate you can get a cut of the money you make selling a property. In fact, in some roles commission makes up almost all of your compensation, meaning your income is variable and highly dependent on your output.

When Is Commission Paid Out?

It works differently at every company, but in general commission payment can be distributed monthly, quarterly, or yearly, depending on a company’s structure and when commission is considered “earned.”

For example, a company may define commission “earned” for a salesperson as when the new client signs a contract. This means that the employee who sold the deal won’t get their commission until a signature is collected and the deal is verified (which usually means they double check to ensure the right salesperson is compensated and the overall transaction is clean and accurate).

Another example: In recruiting, typically commission is earned when someone is hired and stays at the company for a period of time, maybe three or four months. If the new hire leaves before then, the recruiter doesn’t get the commission.

How Is Commission Calculated?

Commissions can be calculated by a set percentage or by a formula. As mentioned above, a recruiter generally gets a percentage of the new hire’s starting salary (usually 10 to 20%), while sales people may have a formula-based commission structure.

Take this scenario. In sales, your total compensation could be 50% base salary and 50% commission. So if your total yearly compensation agreement is for $100,000, $50,000 of that is guaranteed for the year and $50,000 is based on how well you perform. You may earn less than the $100,000 if you don’t reach your goal, but you may also be able to earn more than that number as long as your company doesn’t have a cap or “ceiling”—meaning the point at which an employer stops paying you more commission.

But a company may use an upward sloping curve to decide commission (where you’d earn less than 60%) because they want to really incentivize employees to get as close to their goal as possible—and to even exceed it and make a lot more money. What can be frustrating about this, of course, is that it’s not an easy formula to follow, so it’s not entirely clear what your commission will look like until you receive your paycheck.

They could also use a tiered model (the staircase line). This means you earn the same dollar amount of commission until you reach a certain percentage of your quota, where it jumps up in amount.

There may be other exceptions when you can earn more than the formula typically allows. If you sell a deal where the customer signs on for two years or a special kind of product, for instance, you may earn extra commission for that.

There’s also a concept called a “minimum performance threshold” or “floor,” which is common for more senior-level employees. This basically means that the person must get some percentage to goal in order to start earning any commission—the understanding being that a certain level of underperformance is unacceptable.

If you’re unclear as to how your commission is calculated, talk to your HR or finance departments, or your boss or team lead.

What Happens if I Leave a Job Before Getting My Commission Check?

Whether or not commission is owed to an employee after they’ve been terminated or left a role depends on a number of factors, including what’s defined as “earned” between the company and the employee and state wage law (you can see your state’s rules and regulations around wages here).

Continue on to The Muse to read the complete article.

Why Graduates Who Want a Career Full of Travel and Adventure Should Consider the U.S. Department of State Foreign Service

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Vella Mbenna

Amelia Island, FL—Now that graduation is finally here, you may be dreaming of finding a job that encompasses everything you want in a career: adventure, travel, challenge, growth, risk, and reward. The problem is, most jobs come up short in these areas. But if you’re determined to do meaningful work that’s full of excitement, the Foreign Service may be the right place for you.

For those who may not know, the Foreign Service is the corps of employees dedicated to representing America abroad and responding to the needs of American citizens living and traveling around the world. While not everyone is cut out for this line of work, says Vella Mbenna—who worked in the Foreign Service for 26 years—it is a great job opportunity for ambitious new graduates.

“Being a diplomat with the US Department of State demands intellect, courage, and a sense of adventure—not to mention an unshakable work ethic,” says Mbenna, author of Muddy Roads Blue Skies: My Journey to the Foreign Service, from the Rural South to Tanzania and Beyond (Muddy Roads Press, 2019, ISBN: 978-1-7327918-0-0, $16.99). “If this describes you, you may have what it takes to join the ranks of hardworking citizens making a difference in our global society.”

But make no mistake: Jobs in the Foreign Service are not easy to come by.

“In my opinion, they are one of the hardest government positions to obtain,” says Mbenna. “And once you’re doing the work, you’ll be challenged daily to push yourself and find out what you’re truly made of. You must have the right mindset and the right skill set—and acquiring them is absolutely worth it.”

Early in her life, Mbenna never suspected that she would someday work as a US diplomat with the Foreign Service. After getting her college degree, she wound up back in her hometown in rural Georgia with a young child and few career prospects. But staying put was not an option. Her wanderlust prompted her to apply for a position with the US Department of State, where she eventually became an information management officer (IMO) in charge of information technology (IT) and communications, working in places like Beirut, Uganda, and Tunisia.

There, among her primarily “male, white, Yale” colleagues, Mbenna (a minority three times over: black, Southern, and female) started the long journey to the top. Despite facing instances of insubordination, racism, sexism, and culture shaming, Mbenna worked her way up to level “01,” the highest-grade level you can earn in the Foreign Service—provided there is no desire to hang around for some years to see if you will be selected to join the cadre of senior, policy-level foreign affairs professionals.

For a self-proclaimed adrenaline junkie, the challenges, victories, and even the near misses Mbenna experienced were the very definition of a fulfilling career. Part memoir and part how-to success guide, Muddy Roads Blue Skies tells the remarkable story of Mbenna’s journey from the backwoods of Georgia to the far reaches of the globe.

If you’re ready to graduate and may be interested in a career in the Foreign Service, here are the skills and behaviors Mbenna says you should turn into habits right now:

Do the work—and more. Dutifully do your work every day, and do it well. And when your work is done, see if you can help someone else with theirs. Mbenna routinely went above and beyond throughout her career, including her courageous efforts in the aftermath of the 1998 bombing of the US Embassy in Dar es Salaam. Her contributions during this dangerous time even earned her a Heroism Award from the Department of State.

“My mother’s ‘hard work from dawn to dusk’ mandate, which I was raised with, shaped my professional work ethic,” says Mbenna. “The good news is, anyone can learn this skill with enough perseverance. Challenge yourself daily to not just show up for your work—whatever it may be—but come with a contagiously positive attitude that shows your gratefulness for the type of work you do. Rise to the occasion consistently, and soon it will become second nature, and people will take notice.”

Find a role model/mentor. Develop trusting relationships with colleagues—in the field or not—who can help guide and develop you in your career. Think of someone you admire whom you could learn from and ask them if they will offer you career guidance. The Department of State also has an excellent formal mentor program, which Mbenna highly recommends newer diplomats take full advantage of.

Don’t be afraid to share ideas. “Never sit around the table during meetings thinking you are too low in rank or too ignorant of the subject matter to contribute,” says Mbenna. “You would not be there if you did not have something to contribute. Meetings are the ideal time for discussing ideas; come prepared with at least one or two ideas or questions, and then communicate them. Around mid-career, I became tired of sitting in meetings and rarely contributing. So, my motto became: ‘If you think it, share it.’ It paid off for me, and it will for you too.”

Respect the chain of command. “I do not believe any leader wants to be second-guessed or challenged by a subordinate, especially not in public,” says Mbenna. “The leader is the leader for a reason. Respect the chain of command and insist on it regardless of whether you are the leader, the second-in-command, or the follower.

“Overstepping boundaries without being invited to, especially if it is not your project or post, makes for a rough ride and stressful work environment for the entire team,” she continues. “As someone who has served as a leader and follower in my career, I can confirm that the chain of command works when everyone follows it.”

Be strategic. Don’t leave your career up to chance, advises Mbenna. Think carefully about the path you would like to take, then plan your career trajectory accordingly. Keep in mind that every position and grade level you attain are stepping stones to the next one, so be on the lookout for opportunities to learn and develop while whole-heartedly contributing to the mission. Finally, remember that new skills can qualify you for more advanced positions, so seize every chance to acquire them.

Know when to lead and when to follow. The higher you climb in the Foreign Service (and in most other fields), the more leadership responsibilities you will have. Still, different positions require you to serve in different capacities. Sometimes you will be asked to lead, and other times you will be asked to follow. Learn to do both with ease—and be aware of when either is appropriate—and you will be more valuable to your team and organization.

“After having been a leader in previous roles, I accepted a position on a ‘hardship’ tour in Kabul, Afghanistan,” says Mbenna. “I went in knowing and accepting that this time I would be a follower, and I became a good one because of that mindset. I did what I was supposed to do, and I did it as specified with a smile. Keep in mind that whether you’re a follower or a leader, your work counts. Whatever role you find yourself in, it matters, so be sure to make it work for you.”

Be dedicated/be useful, even in bad conditions. Learn to stay on task even during chaotic times (whether the chaos is work-related or personal). Mbenna’s last Foreign Service assignment was in Tunis, Tunisia, several years after the uprisings of the Arab Spring. Even though the turmoil had resulted in staff reduction and a revolving door of temporary staff at the embassy, Mbenna never stopped working and striving to uphold her responsibilities—not even when a broken leg forced her to work from a hotel and home for several weeks while she recovered.

“Don’t hesitate to do more than your specific duties in calm and chaotic periods,” says Mbenna. “Pitch in and help others, even if they do not ask. If they do not need your help, they will tell you. You’ll never regret going the extra mile, because eventually it will pay off for you, even if it only brings a smile to your face or a good memory years later when telling your Foreign Service story.”

Know when to leave. “When it’s time to leave the Foreign Service, you will know it,” says Mbenna. “This comes at a different time for everyone. It could be a few years into your career, or you may stay until you reach the mandatory retirement age of 65. You might start feeling restless, unsatisfied, or unhappy at work; or missing your family and friends so much that it distracts you from your duties; or simply realizing that you’re ready for your next adventure. Regardless of what it is, pack your bags and leave before you are burned-out or forced to leave. I reached my desired rank and left on my own terms, and what a happy feeling that was!”

“If you want to succeed in a high-stakes work environment like the Foreign Service, you’d better be ready to put your heart and soul into it,” concludes Mbenna. “Be ready to work hard and go all in, and from there the experience acquired and skills you are sharpening each day will help you truly excel. Yes, there are easier careers out there, but few are as rewarding or exhilarating. So if you want it, dig deep into who you are, find your greatness, and let it shine every day.”

About the Author:
Vella Mbenna is the author of Muddy Roads Blue Skies: My Journey to the Foreign Service, from the Rural South to Tanzania and Beyond. She was born in the Holmestown community of Midway, Georgia, where she grew up with eight siblings and parents who instilled in her the important values that would set her on the path to success. Throughout her youth, Vella dreamed of escaping small-town USA and traveling the world. In 1989, that dream came true when she was offered a position with the US Department of State Foreign Service. During her highly successful 26-year career as a diplomat, Vella served with honor in 13 foreign countries as well as two tours in Washington, DC.

7 Tips to Help Mentally Overcome an Employment Gap

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resume tips

Here’s advice on overcoming the mental roadblocks employment gaps create before they sabotage your job search, from those who’ve been there.

William Childs loves his new job. He is Marketing Director at Kitchen Magic, a growing national kitchen remodeling and cabinet refacing company. “This job is a creative person’s dream. The product, the people, the collaborative ideas we are generating, it’s totally amazing,” Childs says. “This is what I spent my 14-month employment gap searching for, and I am so glad I didn’t give up on my career goals.”

Employment gaps do not define you

According to a recent Randstad U.S. study, the average job search today takes about five months. When Childs was laid off late in 2017 from an executive-level marketing job, he did not anticipate a longer-than-average employment gap. He explained: “When my old job was eliminated, it was the first time in many years that I had no specific job to go to next. I had always benefited from people just knowing me and my work, so starting from scratch while unemployed felt pretty weird.” When a few leads at the beginning of his job search didn’t materialize, he felt a bit demoralized.

According to a 2019 Monster survey, 59 percent of Americans have had an unexpected gap in their career. For a lot of people looking for jobs with a gap on their resume, there can be internalized feelings of shame, says Michael “Dr. Woody” Woodward, Ph.D., organizational psychologist, CEC-certified executive coach, and author of “The YOU Plan.” “Shame puts on a lot of added pressure to an already stressful time, which can lead to obsession,” Dr. Woody explains. “Don’t victimize yourself over a lost job or a failure in the past. It can be debilitating.”  He advises readers to recognize their setback as just that, a setback — then deal with it and move on to better things.

Childs did keep moving forward. He designed an online portfolio and kept adding to it during his hiatus by taking on freelance work. He wrote for an online magazine and volunteered his talents to local non-profit groups. A year into his search, he took an advertising sales job as he continued to apply for positions. “The sales job was what I needed to do financially, and what I needed to do for my own piece of mind,” he reflects. “I was earning income, learning, and connecting with people. It helped me a lot.”

While he did not give up on finding an innovative executive marketing position, Childs needed ways to stay focused and positive on his continued career search. When it comes to overcoming the mental roadblocks employment gaps create, the following advice can help keep you more focused, motivated, and confident.

1. Honesty really is the best policy

Susan is happily employed in Reno, Nevada at The Slumber Yard, a specialty online clearinghouse of reviews, comparisons, and deals for mattresses and bedding products. Prior to taking the job last year, this mattress review specialist (whose name has been changed for this piece) had left the workforce to care for her young son after he was injured in a serious accident. When she was ready to re-enter the workforce, Susan crafted a very targeted resume and cover letter that succinctly addressed her employment gap. Still, the two-year pause in her career had her a little nervous. “I wasn’t exactly sure what the job market would be like for me,” she remembers.

“Her resume had everything we were looking for, and when she told me why she had a gap in her employment history, her honesty really impressed me,” says Matthew Ross, The Slumber Yard’s Co-Founder and COO. Ross immediately called Susan in for an interview. “Her experience and knowledge of our industry are what got her the job. But, the way that she explained her employment gap really showed her character, both as a person and as a professional.”

You can explain your employment gap without oversharing, says Dick Lively, Partner and HR Consulting Director at RAI Resources in Bethlehem, Pennsylvania. “On a resume or in a cover letter, saying you took time to care for a family member who was ill or that you relocated across the country for your spouse’s job should be enough detail. Keep it professional but not too personal,” he says. It is also OK to exclude a gap explanation from the resume altogether, so long as you are prepared to address it during the interview if you are asked. Just don’t make something up. “At the end of the day, the truth always comes out, explains Lively. “You don’t want to face a potential employer or a new boss and try to explain why you lied.”

2. Don’t stop networking

Your first instinct may be to hide away until you have a new job, but that will not help your efforts. In fact, it might even hurt them. Keeping your name and face out there can help you get an introduction to a hiring manager. Plus, it’s great practice for interviews. “For me, I talked about the creative process and exchanged ideas; it helped me formulate how to best present myself as a job candidate,” says Childs.

Lively suggests that you don’t wait too long after your last job ends to start networking: “It is not only important to get your name out there and to hear about jobs that may be coming up through the grapevine,” he explains. “You also need to talk shop and connect with people. The longer you wait, the less confident you may feel. Interpersonal skills need to be kept sharp, just like any other skill.” That said, it is OK to take a few days or even a couple of weeks after your last job ends to regain your composure before you start networking. The last thing you want to do is get emotional about your job loss in front of your professional connections.

3. Expand your network

As valuable as your tried-and-true network of professional connections is, Dr. Woody cautions that you shouldn’t always drink from the same well when you are trying to find a new job. “Always networking with the same group of people can put blinders on your job search or create an echo chamber where you keep repeating the same steps that aren’t working anymore.”

Expanding his network definitely helped Childs. “Learning about new businesses and how they do things and connecting with new people is very inspiring,” he says. Telling new people a bit about yourself helps remind you about your talents and experience. You don’t know what else is out there if you don’t ever mix things up.

4. Own your truth

“You can, and should, use a positive spin when talking about your experiences,” says Childs. During an interview or a phone screening, don’t try to hide what caused your employment gap. Don’t complain or point fingers either. Tell your story concisely and truthfully, ending with what you learned or what you have gained since. When Childs interviewed with his new employer, he was prepared to lay his cards on the table when the question came up about his resume gap. His honest, three-sentence elevator speech consisted of:

  1. I was laid off when my department was eliminated.
  2. I am now doing advertising sales. It’s not me, but it’s a job, and I am proud of the quality of work I do.
  3. I have learned a lot about customer service through this sales experience, and I can apply that knowledge to my next marketing and creative position.

Dr. Woody believes this kind of planning is invaluable: “Preparation builds confidence. Working on your narrative reminds you that you have talent and have a lot to offer an employer. Taking time to boil it down to a concise summary instills it in your mind. This is who you are.”

5. Keep up a motivating routine

For years, Childs has emailed daily “Thought Bombs” to colleagues and friends. These are quotes he has collected on creativity, inspiration, and business integrity. Throughout his 14-month job search, he committed himself to continuing this morning ritual. “It got me up and thinking, ready for the day,” he says. “On my worst days, I would tell myself, ‘All I gotta do is get out of bed and deliver the Thought Bomb,’ and it really helped me get moving.”

“I really love this,” says Dr. Woody. “He used this routine to get himself into the right mindset each day. He had a purpose that was of value to his mailing list, and the discipline it took to do this daily task set his whole day in positive motion.” For other people, the routine could be mediation, exercise, journaling, or some other daily ritual.

6. Concentrate on the connection

Childs kept himself well-versed in the current ideas and trends in his field. His knowledge and passion for his work inevitably crept into his cover letters and interviews. “People are much more engaged with stories that are filled with excitement, passion, and personality,” says Childs. “Bragging and standard-issue talking points get stale quickly, but if you can connect with someone about what truly motivates and inspires you, they won’t forget you.”

Coming across as arrogant or whiny is a red flag for employers, notes Dr. Woody. But sharing insights and understanding about your field is a way to help them envision working with you. It also helps them put your employment gap into perspective in relation to your qualifications and talent. He explains: “People remember more about how you made them feel than about the specifics of what you said.”

Continue on to Top Resume to read the complete article.

Regina King Inks First-Look, Multi-Year Deal With Netflix And Fans Love It

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Regina King

Regina King has just inked a first-look deal with Netflix to produce films and television series, prompting much excitement on social media.

King’s company, Royal Ties (King, Royal ― her mind!!), has partnered with the streaming service for the multi-year deal, which typically gives the company the right of first refusal for unwritten projects. Her sister, Reina King, will be head of production for the new company.

Regina King, who won an Oscar for Best Supporting Actress for “If Beale Street Could Talk,” recently took home an Emmy for her role in Netflix’s limited series “Seven Seconds.”

“Regina King is a multi-faceted talent both behind and in front of the camera. She’s been a trailblazer for years, with boundless creativity and impeccable taste in projects, and we couldn’t be more thrilled that she will bring her formidable talents to Netflix,” Ted Sarandos, Netflix chief content officer, said in a statement.

King said in the release that she’s “beyond thrilled to join the Netflix family.”

“They are at the top of their game and as an artist, I am so excited to come play in this wonderful sandbox they have created for storytellers,” the actress said.

Fans have been showing love on Twitter, calling King “admirable” and her Netflix deal “well deserved.”

Continue on to Black Voices to read the complete article.

Why is Being a Team Player Important?

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group of businesspeople in a team meeting

By Greg Stuart

From time to time, you will be forced to work in a team setting. Not only do you have to function in your team setting, you also have to be able to effectively collaborate with other teams in the workplace.

Rarely do situations exist where there isn’t any separation of duties.

That being said, working within a team is not always a fun scenario. In fact, it can be the worst. Why? In a team setting, your team is only as good as your weakest link. This is true in sports, and the workplace. If you have an amazing offense, but your place kicker does not do well, you could lose games for it. If you are a superstar at presenting material to decision-makers, but the technical elements can’t implement the ideas, your team is actually terrible. Your great ideas are pointless. Let’s explore how to be good team players, even in the worst scenarios.

You Can’t Be Your Best Alone

To start this off, I’m going to suggest you read two books that are crucial to achieving happiness in the workplace and achieving your full potential. They are both written by Ted Talker Shawn Achor—The Happiness Advantage (read this first) and Big Potential (follow-up to Happiness Advantage). The place to start is to become a happier person. This will dramatically impact how you function in a team setting. If you are happier, you will be more productive, more positive and a better team member. As Shawn points out in his book, working more doesn’t necessarily equal success and happiness. Being happy first equals success and productivity in the workplace.

In Big Potential, Shawn points out how you can’t achieve your full potential all by yourself. Think about growing up and the people who you had in your life who have influenced you. Some of us had lots of support, some of us didn’t, but I think most people can look back and see how their success was influenced by others. Studies coming from Big Potential point out that Harvard students who crammed and studied all by themselves fared worse on exams than those who joined study groups and worked together to learn. The workplace is no different. The more we learn to rely on each other’s strengths and less on weaknesses, the more successful we’ll be as a team.

What to Do with the Slacker

At some point in your career, you will have a team member who doesn’t do his or her part. He or she is slacking. When you get a slacker on your team, it’s hard to not be angry at him for not pulling his weight. This is especially true when you have put in a ton of effort on your part and he does just enough to squeak by. What do you do with The Slacker? What I have found works from past experiences is engaging the slacker head on. I don’t suggest yelling at them. Instead, help them to understand what their responsibility is and then give them ownership of it. People who take ownership of tasks tend to put forth more effort because they want their work to shine. Think about when you were a kid and your dad asked you to clean the garage because he knew you were the best at it (I’m guilty of using this tactic with my kids). How much effort did you put into cleaning the garage? If you were like me, you owned it and were so happy when your dad looked it over and was amazed at the job you did. The same applies in team setting—engage the slacker and give them ownership of a task.

Getting What You Want Without Being Selfish

Generally speaking, getting what you want can really be seen as a selfish thing, but it doesn’t have to be. Everyone should get what they want, but it’s not always possible. Contrary to popular belief, compromise is not a win-win situation, it’s lose-lose. In a compromise, each party loses some aspect of what they want. I want to watch Rocky IV for the 100th time, and my wife wants to watch a Hallmark movie. We compromise and watch the Food Network instead. We both lose! I’m not watching Rocky and she’s not watching Hallmark. We need to look at compromises this way in the workplace, especially in a team setting.

Being the Example

If you want to be a good team player, you have to set the example. Through your actions, you need to show your team how you would like to be treated. Talk about confrontation, talk about conflict management, and set rules. If you set a good example, your team will see that and follow suit.

Source: news.clearancejobs.com

Reprinted with Permission

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