Peace Corps kicks off inaugural HBCU Barbershop Tour

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Peace Corps Barber Shop Tour

Peace Corps launches its first-ever HBCU Barbershop Tour in October with visits to historically black colleges and universities in the District of Columbia, Maryland, Delaware and Virginia. The tour officially kicked off on October 2 at Nile Style Barbershop near Morgan State University in Baltimore.

“In the African American community, the barbershop is the cornerstone of politics, religion, sports, culture, networking and professional development,” said Peace Corps Diversity Recruiter Dwayne Matthews (pictured) a returned Peace Corps volunteer from Little Rock, Arkansas and a graduate of HBCU Norfolk State University in Virginia. “This tour is a chance for the Peace Corps to participate in these conversations – to listen, engage and share information about the opportunities available through volunteer service in an organic and familiar setting.”

The tour will feature 10 stops on HBCU campuses and local barbershops that serve the university population and surrounding communities. Each visit will include stakeholder meetings with university and college staff, class talks and information sessions on campus and panel discussions with returned Peace Corps volunteers and university alumni at local barbershops.

Over 30 percent of Peace Corps volunteers self-report as racially or ethnically diverse, following the agency’s efforts to expand outreach to diverse communities across the United States. The HBCU Barbershop Tour is the Peace Corps’ latest effort to expand opportunities for international service and recruit a volunteer corps that shares the rich diversity of America with communities around the world.

Here is the full October tour schedule with dates and locations:

  1. October 2: Morgan State University and Nile Style Barbershop (Maryland)
  2. October 3: Virginia Union University and Mike Blendz (Virginia)
  3. October 9: Bowie State University and Bowie Town Barbers (Maryland)
  4. October 15: Norfolk State University and Kappatal Cuts (Virginia)
  5. October 16: Virginia State University and Real Cutz (Virginia)
  6. October 22: Hampton University and Just Earl Barbershop (Virginia)
  7. October 23: Howard University and Wanda’s on 7th (Washington, D.C.)
  8. October 24: Delaware State University and J Stylez Barbershop (Delaware)
  9. October 29: University of Maryland, Eastern Shore and Wolf Barbershop (Maryland)
  10. October 30: Coppin State University and Phaze Two Barbershop (Maryland)

About the Peace Corps: The Peace Corps sends Americans with a passion for service abroad on behalf of the United States to work with communities and create lasting change. Volunteers develop sustainable solutions to address challenges in education, health, community economic development, agriculture, environment and youth development. Through their Peace Corps experience, volunteers gain a unique cultural understanding and a life-long commitment to service that positions them to succeed in today’s global economy. Since President John F. Kennedy established the Peace Corps in 1961, more than 230,000 Americans of all ages have served in 141 countries worldwide.

For more information, visit peacecorps.gov

Langston Hughes’ Impact on the Harlem Renaissance

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During the Harlem Renaissance, which took place roughly from the 1920s to the mid-’30s, many black artists flourished as public interest in their work took off. One of the Renaissance’s leading lights was poet and author Langston Hughes.

Hughes not only made his mark in this artistic movement by breaking boundaries with his poetry, he drew on international experiences, found kindred spirits amongst his fellow artists, took a stand for the possibilities of black art, and influenced how the Harlem Renaissance would be remembered.

Hughes stood up for black artists George Schuyler, editor of a black paper in Pittsburgh, wrote the article “The Negro-Art Hokum” for an edition of The Nation in June 1926.

The article discounted the existence of “Negro art,” arguing that African-American artists shared European influences with their white counterparts, and were therefore producing the same kind of work. Spirituals and jazz, with their clear links to black performers, were dismissed as folk art.

Invited to make a response, Hughes penned “The Negro Artist and the Racial Mountain.” In it, he described black artists rejecting their racial identity as “the mountain standing in the way of any true Negro art in America.” But he declared that instead of ignoring their identity, “We younger Negro artists who create now intend to express our individual, dark-skinned selves without fear or shame.”

This clarion call for the importance of pursuing art from a black perspective was not only the philosophy behind much of Hughes’ work, but it was also reflected throughout the Harlem Renaissance.

To read the complete article, continue on to Biography.

The Institute for Educational Leadership Launches Rise Up for Equity Campaign to Eliminate Barriers to Equity in Education and Workforce Development

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education campaign for African-Americans

The Institute for Educational Leadership (IEL) announced  the launch of Rise Up for Equity, a digital and grassroots campaign  to prepare, support, and mobilize leaders to eliminate systemic barriers to equity in education and workforce development.
This so everyone – especially transition-age youth and families in communities with inequitable opportunities across the United States – has the opportunity to succeed and lead independent lives.

“IEL incentivizes communities to innovate and prepares and supports local and state leaders to improve opportunity and outcomes, and close gaps in access and achievement in education and workforce development in under-resourced communities,” said Johan Uvin, President of IEL. “To us, equity is about creating more opportunities for success in education and workforce development for children, youth, adults and families, particularly in communities where that opportunity is lacking due to systemic and structural reasons.”

IEL’s strategy intends to help alleviate poverty and its impact and to contribute to creating new gateways to prosperity. Today 15 million children, or 21 percent of all children live in families with incomes below the federal poverty threshold, and 51 percent of students across U.S. public schools are low income.[1] Childhood poverty is associated with negative outcomes in adulthood, such as lower academic achievement, employment rates, and poorer health.

For more information about how you can Rise Up for Equity to support leaders so all children, young adults, and communities can succeed, visit www.riseupforequity.com or join the conversation on social media using #RiseUpforEquity.

[1] According to the 2016 fact sheet of the  National Center for Children in Poverty (NCCP)

Black PR Wire Power Profiler on Dr. Maulana Karenga

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maulena-karenga

Dr. Maulana Karenga is professor of Africana Studies at California State University, Long Beach. He is also chair of the President’s Task Force on Multicultural Education and Campus Diversity at California State University, Long Beach.

Dr. Karenga holds two Ph.D.’s; his first in political science with focus on the theory and practice of nationalism (United States International University) and his second in social ethics with a focus on the classical African ethics of ancient Egypt (University of Southern California). He also holds an honorary doctorate of philosophy from the University of Durban-Westville, South Africa.

Moreover, Dr. Karenga is the director of the Kawaida Institute of Pan-African Studies, Los Angeles, and national chairman of The Organization Us, a cultural and social change organization, so named to stress the communitarian focus of the organization. Dr. Karenga has had a profound and far-reaching effect on Black intellectual and political culture. Through his organization Us and his philosophy, Kawaida, he has played a vanguard role in shaping the Black Arts Movement, Black Studies, the Black Power Movement, Black Student Union Movement, Afrocentri¬city, rites of passage programs, the study of ancient Egyptian culture as an essential part of Black Studies, the independent Black school movement, African life-cycle ceremonies, the Simba Wachanga youth movement, and Black theological and ethical discourse.

Dr. Karenga is also widely known as the creator of Kwanzaa, an African American and Pan-African holiday celebrated throughout the world African community on every continent in the world. He is the author of the authoritative book on the subject: Kwanzaa: A Celebration of Family, Community and Culture and lectures regularly and extensively on the vision and values of Kwanzaa, especially the Nguzo Saba (The Seven Principles), in various national and international venues.

Continue on to BlackPrWire to read the complete article.

The Howard University Ooh La La! Dance Line Wins the #RadiantDanceOff Contest

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Howard University Dancers

It’s official, the Howard University Ooh La La! dance line reigns supreme, winning the second annual HBCU Dance #RadiantDanceOff Contest presented by The Radiant Collection from Procter & Gamble’s (P&G) leading feminine protection brands Tampax® and Always®, in partnership with HBCU Dance Corporation, Inc.

This year, the Ooh La La! dance line competed against 19 HBCU schools nationwide in the #RadiantDanceOff to win $20,000 and custom uniforms created by Briana Bigham, a seasoned designer who has worked with some of the most popular labels in fashion.

“HBCU dancers are some of the hardest working women on the yard, and they give their all in every performance. Their skill and on-the-field radiance shined in every #RadiantDanceOff submission we received so choosing just one winning team was a huge challenge,” says Keelia Brown, founder of HBCU Dance Corporation, Inc. “The #RadiantDanceOff competition shines a light on the confidence and talent of the amazing women on the teams, and the prize from The Tampax and Always Radiant Collection will help them keep dancing.”

This was the second annual #RadiantDanceOff contest, a national online dance competition designed exclusively for Historically Black Colleges and Universities (HBCUs). Created in 2017, the contest was designed to change the fact that African-American women avoid activities like dancing, and even compromise their style during their periods1. The contest highlights the bold moves and fierce styles worn by HBCU dance lines to show women everywhere that they can wear and do whatever they want with confidence, any day of the month, and showcases the incredible skill of majorettes across the country.

This homecoming season, eligible HBCU dance teams competed to earn one of the top five spots in the #RadiantDanceOff competition. As per last year’s program, eligible teams entered by submitting a two-minute video that was voted on by fans, alumni and students, along with a short essay highlighting why their team runs the yard. A panel then judged the five dance teams with the highest number of votes on:

  • Difficulty of dance steps, cohesiveness and technical proficiency
  • Originality of dance performance
  • Creative execution of wardrobe selection
  • Ability to convey character and expression in the dance
  • Essay submission

“The Tampax and Always Radiant Collection is all about giving women the freedom to be the fiercest version of themselves any day of the month,” says Melissa Suk, Brand Director, North America Feminine Care at Procter & Gamble. “The women of Howard University radiate confidence every day, and we’re happy we can help them shine even brighter on the field.”

Continue on to Business Wire to read the complete article.

83-Year-Old Veteran to Receive Ph.D. from LSU

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Johnnie Jones’ age isn’t stopping him from learning. In fact, the 83-year-old veteran will receive his Ph.D. from LSU on Friday, Dec. 14.

“Every person regardless of his station in life, or his or her limitations, should seek to be the best he or she can really be. And you spend your time living not thinking about dying. Death will take care of itself,” Jones said.

Jones used that focus to pursue a bachelor’s degree, master’s degree and a Ph.D., and he has hopes of going to law school next.

“I want to study law. I have no intention of being an attorney; I simply want to go to law school for the knowledge, and I’m sure there will be students in the class who think I’m nuts, but so what?”

Jones was born in Mississippi and at the age of 18, joined the Marine Corps. His LSU education started while he was deployed to Vietnam as a squad leader.

“I wanted to stay connected, so to speak. I didn’t want to run the risk of losing interest because I had begun studies at San Diego Community College when I went to Vietnam,” Jones said. “LSU’s correspondence course was offered to any student, regardless where they were or what their status was, so I just happened to take advantage of the program.”

After he left Vietnam, Jones received a degree in sociology from the University of Hawaii.

“From Hawaii I moved back to California, where I submitted a number of applications for graduate school, and LSU came through first, plus I had already been taking a course from LSU, so I settled on LSU.”

Jones received a Master’s of Social Work from LSU in 1975 and was about nine hours short of his Ph.D. when he received a job offer from the Department of Corrections. He would retire 25 years later as the warden for the women’s prison.

“Of course, having a family and young children, I took the job and that’s how that turned out,” Jones said. “And as a consequence, I ran out the required seven year time period that they give you to complete the Ph.D. So I had to start all over again from scratch.”

Jones started over, but another set-back prevented him from receiving a Ph.D.

“I had a serious health problem and again, I had completed all of the requirements for the Ph.D. in human ecology, but I had to drop out because of health reasons.”

Just when he was ready to start working toward the degree for the third time, Jones said a professor helped him get an extension, allowing him to complete his dissertation and not have to start over again.

“My dissertation was about racism and religion and specifically the perceptions of racism and the stress that black families experience as a result, and how religion serves as a coping strategy.”

Jones said the state provides free tuition for students over 65 years old and said LSU’s faculty have both supported and challenged him. He added, the other students have enjoyed having him in class.

“It was really comical, most of my classmates are young enough to be my grandchildren and they found it amazing at my age that I would be sitting in a classroom. They thought I was nuts. They didn’t quite understand what motivated me. They’re all preparing for occupations, but my occupation was over. I had retired. I was just there for self-edification,” said Jones. “I told them the reason why I was doing that, is because to me age is something that we have been socialized to believe that it is one of the most important things in our life. At 15, you’re supposed to be doing this, at 25 you’re supposed to be doing this, at 65…that’s arbitrary. I think you should not cease pursuing whatever it is you’re interested in because of age. Your only limitation that you should have is mental or physical, other than that you should keep on pushing.”

Continue onto Louisiana State University Newsroom to read the complete article.

Explore Your Options: The One-Year or the Two-Year MBA?

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Choosing between a one-year MBA and a two-year MBA should be a simple matter of personal choice. Yet, the reality isn’t so straightforward.

If you wanted to study at a top school in the United States, for example, you would find your selection of one-year MBA programs somewhat limited, although the idea is catching on. The same would apply in Europe if you were looking for a two-year program. So, you may have to compromise on one of these aspects.

The two-year format of the MBA is the long-time precursor of its one-year counterpart, brought into being by the Tuck School of Business back in 1900. The one-year MBA came to prominence in Europe 60 years later. This condensing of the degree might have come as an affront to some leading management experts at the time, but the format gained traction. According to The Graduate Management Admission Council® (GMAC®), a global, non-profit association of leading graduate business schools, in its 2016 Applications Trends Survey, it is becoming the more popular of the two program lengths.

This North American-European divide is still in play, and may well impact your options in terms of program length—be it a decision on the length of program you pursue or one on where you study. Though there are certainly exceptions on both side.

The Two-Year MBA: Time on Your Side

“We haven’t felt comfortable offering a one-year MBA here,” Madhav Rajan, former senior associate dean at the Stanford Graduate School of Business (now at Chicago Booth), told the New York Times back in 2014. “I think there would be huge demand if we ever went that route, but given the content we want to disseminate, that’s not something we’ve pursued.”

This is the big argument for the two- year MBA encapsulated. The two-year program (and remember that ‘two years’ can mean anything from between 16 and 24 months), allows students more time to read, digest, study, and apply what they’ve learned. The schedule may be slightly less intense than a one-year program, leaving more days to participate in extracurricular activities and networking.

A longer MBA program may also mean more opportunity to do electives. MBA programs are composed of the core subjects that need to be covered by all students to obtain a full grasp of management, but there are also chances to specialize. With hundreds of electives available at some schools, students are offered a colorful bouquet of options. If that makes you feel like a kid in a candy store, well … maybe you should look into two-year MBA options.

Career Switchers

Most, if not all, two-year MBA programs feature a summer internship as the filling in the sandwich. For students who have not had a traditional business background or who want to change sector, this can be an excellent opportunity to trial a new industry or job function, without having to commit long-term. Younger students with less work experience may also benefit from the experience the internship can provide.

The One-Year MBA

The one-year MBA benefits two sets of students in particular: those with solid functional experience, and those who know precisely what job they’re aiming for when they set foot on campus.

The one-year MBA can cost as much as 50 percent less than a two-year MBA, and you’ll only have to save up enough money to cover your living costs for one year. Taking one year rather than two out of work also means a great deal less salary lost, too. Nick Barniville is director of MBA and master’s programs at the European School of Management and Technology in Berlin. He explains that, in addition to time and money saving, “all evidence from major rankings suggests that graduates from one-year programs earn roughly the same as those graduating from similarly ranked two-year programs.

“Participants on one-year programs get less vacation and have a more intense work schedule; this can be included as an efficiency benefit because it makes little sense to be paying a lot of money to have free time,” he adds.

Ultimately, the decision is a personal one. How much experience do you have? How sure are you of your future plans? Where do you want to study? Do you want to change careers or just upskill? Consider your options carefully, and make sure that you speak to schools in the process, so you can fully understand which is the right format for you.

Author-Karen Turtle
Source: This article first appeared in TopMBA.com

Aaron I. Bruce Named Vice President and Chief Diversity Officer of ArtCenter College of Design

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Aaron Bruce posing for camera

November 27, 2018, Pasadena, Calif. – ArtCenter College of Design President Lorne M. Buchman announced today that, after a comprehensive international search, the College has named Aaron I. Bruce to the new inaugural role of vice president and chief diversity officer.

With more than 20 years of experience leading initiatives focused on campus diversity, inclusion and international engagement, Bruce will officially begin his tenure at ArtCenter on December 3, 2018, and will lead the establishment of a new Center for Diversity, Equity and Inclusion in Art and Design.

Since 2008, Bruce has served as the chief diversity officer at San Diego State University where he led the implementation of that University’s diversity strategic plan.

“His achievements in curricular redesign, recruitment, retention, marketing and global community programming are all deeply impressive,” said Buchman. “His passion for art and design, together with his extensive record of research and program development in areas of diversity, equity and inclusion, make him an ideal candidate for the job.”

“I’m excited to join such a stellar team of creative giants,” said Bruce. “ArtCenter represents the intersection of some of the most innovative art and design spaces in the world. The journey towards adopting inclusive art and design strategies provides us with the power to collectively change human expression in ways we cannot fully imagine.”

Bruce holds a PhD from the University of Rhode Island and a Masters of International Business Administration from United States International University (Alliant).

As envisioned, the Center for Diversity, Equity and Inclusion in Art and Design will involve students, alumni, faculty and staff, as well as external communities, in robust research, exhibitions, symposia, lectures and curricular expansion on issues of diversity, equity, and inclusion (DEI) in art and design. The proposed Center for DEI will create and support collaborative and transformative activities in the service of the College’s values of DEI that are designed to break new ground through practice, scholarship and pedagogy. In addition, the Center will serve as a partner to ensure that DEI programs, practices and policies for faculty, staff and students are aligned with the College’s strategic plan, values and mission.

“Harnessing creative energy to develop positive change globally is just one of the many characteristics that attract me to ArtCenter. Research shows that embracing the unique identities and lived experiences of artists and designers helps industries achieve higher levels of performance,” said Bruce. “I envision the Center for Diversity, Equity and Inclusion in Art and Design to be a nucleus, where the combined energy of our community helps us thrive. The goal is to build a flexible learning space where diverse research, pedagogy and creative expression is explored. A space where all perspectives are valued, and new skills will be adopted. The end game is to prepare students to be successful creative leaders in a highly diverse and globalized workforce.”

About ArtCenter College of Design

Founded in 1930 and located in Pasadena, California, ArtCenter College of Design is a global leader in art and design education. ArtCenter offers 11 undergraduate and seven graduate degrees in a wide variety of industrial design disciplines as well as visual and applied arts. In addition to its top-ranked academic programs, the College also serves members of the Greater Los Angeles region through a highly regarded series of year-round continuing education programs for all ages and levels of experience. Renowned for both its ties to industry and its social impact initiatives, ArtCenter is the first design school to receive the United Nations’ Non-Governmental Organization (NGO) status. Throughout the College’s long and storied history, ArtCenter alumni have had a profound impact on popular culture, the way we live and important issues in our society.

Guillaume to Lead The Crimson’s 146th Guard

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Kristine E. Guillaume ’20 will lead the newly elected 146th Guard of The Harvard Crimson, the organization’s President announced on Monday. Guillaume is the first black woman to serve as President of The Crimson in the paper’s 145-year history.

Guillaume, a joint African American Studies and History and Literature concentrator, is currently one of The Crimson’s Central Administration reporters. In that capacity, she interviewed two successive University Presidents — Drew G. Faust and Lawrence S. Bacow — and worked as part of the reporting team that covered Harvard’s 2018 presidential search.

She is also one of three Chairs of The Crimson’s Diversity and Inclusivity committee, responsible for formulating and overseeing initiatives meant to make the paper more diverse and welcoming to students from all backgrounds. Guillaume, who lives in Lowell House, will begin as President on Jan. 1, 2019.

“I have the utmost confidence in the 146th Guard’s ability to carry on our proud mission of covering and informing Harvard and its affiliates,” current Crimson President Derek G. Xiao ’19 said. “I could not be more excited to see the direction the next President, Managing Editor, and Business Manager will take The Crimson in 2019.”

News writer and designer Angela N. Fu ’20 will serve as Managing Editor, overseeing the production of The Crimson’s daily newspaper, magazine, arts, and sports sections, and blog. Fu, a Government concentrator and Dunster House resident who hails from Birmingham, Ala., currently serves as a Faculty of Arts and Sciences Administration reporter. In that role, she interviewed two successive FAS Deans — Michael D. Smith and Claudine Gay — and helped report on the presidential search along with Guillaume. She also led The Crimson’s Design Board comp for two semesters.

Fu was one of two reporters who broke a story revealing that star Economics professor Roland G. Fryer, Jr. was being investigated separately by Harvard and the state of Massachusetts over allegations of sexual harassment. She faced down a threatened lawsuit to report the piece, which later earned “Honorable Mention” for Associated Collegiate Press 2018 Story of the Year.

Next year’s Business Manager will be Charlie B. Zhu ’20, an Applied Math and Economics concentrator and resident of Winthrop House from Warren, N.J. He will take the helm of The Crimson’s finances and operations after serving this year as a Director of Staff Development for the Business Board. Prior to that, he worked as an Advertising Associate.

Continue onto The Harvard Crimson to read the full article.

One Voice, One Mission—NBMBAA 2018 Conference Wrap-Up

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NBMBAA President and other members cutting the ribbon at annual ceremonyRibbon Cutting

By Jovane Marie

DiversityComm, Inc., more than 8,500 attendees, representatives from more than 250 leading Fortune 500 companies, and 45 colleges and universities attended the National Black MBA Association (NBMBAA) 40th Anniversary Conference and Exposition in Detroit, Michigan, September 25–29.

Formed in 1970 as an initiative to share insight and experiences with Black professionals within the corporate sector, the NBMBAA serves as an influential nationwide organization with a multi-faceted approach to nurturing its members through innovative programs, trainings, partnerships, and career opportunities.

The conference was themed “One Voice, One Mission,” and key strategic partners, including Nationwide, FedEx Corporation, Fiat Chrysler Automobiles US LLC, and Marriott International provided support and sponsorship to the week-long affair, which was praised for its organization and commitment to excellence.

Mona Lisa Faris, president and founder of DiversityComm, Inc., sat down with NBMBAA President and CEO Jesse Tyson and FedEx Staff Vice President of Operations Analysis Donald Comer to learn more about the organizations’ present and future goals, as well as how their personal and professional life experiences have impacted their approach to and influence in leading what has become the premier business organization serving Black professionals.

“We have more than 14,000 members who expect a lot from our organization, so we try to run it using the same business principles as our corporate partners,” Jesse Tyson said. “It’s important that we remain authentic and take great measures to ensure we align with sponsors that share our values. It takes an army of good, dedicated people to pull this event off, and that’s exactly what we have.”

Building and maintaining that dedicated army capable of holding the nonprofit to a high standard has been a priority for both Tyson—who stepped in to lead NBMBAA after a successful 35-year career at ExxonMobil—and Comer, also the NBMBAA Chairman of the Board.

NBMBAA President and CEO Jesse Tyson
NBMBAA President and CEO Jesse Tyson

Tyson can distinctly recall growing up in the rural, segregated South with his grandparents, working as a sharecropper to make a living. It was an upbringing that fueled a burning desire to overcome his circumstances and forge a different path for his life.

“I knew it was never a question of if I would get out…it was just a matter of timing,” he said. “I went through what I did knowing the day would come when things would change and I would be able to reposition my family and change the trajectory of where we had been.”

Tyson went on to attend a Historically Black College and University (HBCU), where he caught the attention of a professor that would change the course of the self-professed country boy’s life. Sensing his talent, the professor pushed for him to apply for an internship with the State Department—something Tyson assumed wasn’t his cup of tea.

“He hounded me for three weeks to apply, finally going so far as to fill out the entire application on my behalf without my knowledge,” he said. “When he approached me and said all he needed was a signature, I obliged—mostly so he’d leave me alone!”

Three weeks later, however, Tyson got the surprise of his life when he got a visit from the FBI to conduct a background check. He was quickly accepted into the program, where he spent three months in Washington, D.C., and five months in Dakar, Senegal. The experience, he said, was a turning point, solidifying his love for business and planting leadership seeds that would mature and blossom over the next several decades.

“What I’ve learned, internalized, and applied throughout the years is that it can’t just be about me—to be truly successful, you have to champion a greater cause—that of community,” Tyson said. “If your elevator takes you to the top floor, it’s not just to sightsee—you’ve got to not only send it back down but also utilize that further view to react and avoid potential catastrophe for those in your charge. You’ve got to use your advantage to see the broader causes that will help position you to help others. Helping others is what it’s all about, and it’s why I do what I do.”

FedEx Staff Vice President of Operations Analysis Donald Comer standing at podium
FedEx Staff Vice President of Operations Analysis Donald Comer

For Comer, it has been the professional growth offered through FedEx, a company that thrives on diversity and inclusion, that has contributed to his overall view on what is important for both the business and the employee.

On a day-to-day basis, he leads a team focused on researching and implementing artificial intelligence strategies, machine learning, and big data.

“At FedEx, we believe in the business value of diversity and in the growth of our employees,” he said. “You’ll find that we’re not just on the career floor when we attend this conference; we participate in all of the areas that are focused on those goals that align with our business objectives, from sponsoring the pitch contests to investing in small businesses and hosting e-commerce committees. We also sponsor the IMPACT awards and the Leaders of Tomorrow program. We’re trying to show that diversity isn’t just philanthropic—it’s what drives business.”

Comer attended his first NBMBAA conference in 1997 on behalf of FedEx and hasn’t missed one since. As his participation has grown, so has the company’s involvement, with FedEx presenting its largest booth yet at the Career Expo in addition to their other sponsored events. Since 2016, the company has contributed close to $4.4 million to facilitate helping those needing business assistance in reaching their goals.

“When we attend NBMBAA, we know we’ll have access to the best talent to fulfill our available opportunities, from full-time professional positions to entry-level and even internships,” he said. “The main goal is connecting people to opportunities.”

The annual traditional Business Case Competition, which gives students an opportunity to pitch a business case for a chance to win scholarships, was a highlight of the conference, with both undergraduate and graduate levels represented.

The Scale-Up Pitch Challenge finals—a Shark Tank-style competition for professionals to pitch their innovative and scalable start-up business ideas to a group of judges—sponsored by FedEx Corporation—was also a huge draw.

NBMBAA-Attendees and Exhibitors meet one-on-one

While the conference exceeded its mission as a business opportunity for its attendees, there was also a human element at play during the week—the desire to help position the next generation to be successful, Tyson said.

“My grandmother often said that life should be lived in three phases: learning, earning, and returning,” Tyson said. “I rose above those circumstances and learned that it can’t just be about me rising above—it has to be about a greater cause, and that cause is my community.”

“We do what we do here because not only because we enjoy it but also because we know our young folks need it. We’re living in a global economy today, and if they’re not ready to think internationally, then they’re going to be behind. That’s why what we do here is important,” he added.

NBMBAA Wells Fargo NBMBAA NCUA NBMBAA-United Technologies

NBMBAA exhibitors, left to right; Wells Fargo, NCUA and United Technologies were on hand to meet with attendees one-on-one at the annual career fair.

The National Black MBA Association® will hold its 41st Annual Conference and Exposition in Houston, Texas, September 24-28, 2019, with the theme “Transcend the Power of You: Empowered to Lead, Equipped to Succeed.” For more information, visit nbmbaa.org.

About the Author

Jovane Marie is a U.S. Marine Corps veteran and freelance journalist. She is also the founder of MUSE Enterprises, which provides brand ambassadorship and event planning services for small businesses. Connect with her via LinkedIn @JovaneMarie.

Senator Parker Hosts Annual Black College Expo

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Students met college recruiters from various institutions and participated in workshops to learn more about college access and affordability.

Hundreds of college-bound high school students joined State Senator Kevin Parker and the National College Resources Foundation (NCRF) for the Annual Black College Expo at Medgar Evers College on Saturday.
“Every year, The Black College Expo aims to create a platform for children of color to learn more about the college admissions process, and to network and gain insight on scholarships,” said Diana Love, director of College Access and New Business Development at NCRF.

During the expo, students met college recruiters to explore their pathways to higher education institutions. Families were able to discuss the college admissions process, scholarship opportunities and what attending a historically black college means to their academic success. Students and parents also had the opportunity to participate in a myriad of workshops from test prep tips for the SAT and ACT to resume writing sessions.

In addition to co-sponsoring the event, Senator Parker afforded a $1,000 scholarship to a student headed to college next year.

“It can be difficult for parents and students to navigate the college admissions process, and this event helps by focusing on both accessibility and affordability students of color,” stated Senator Parker. “I am thankful to the National College Resources Foundation for being such a critical resource for students of color here in New York State and across the country.”

Continue onto BK Reader to read the complete article.

3 Tips for Filling Out Applications for College Financial Aid

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College students and parents are already looking ahead to the 2019—2020 school year with the FAFSA- the Free Application for Federal Student Aid. The great news is that the Department of Education just launched “myStudentAid” app to make it easier for students and families to fill out the federal student aid application through their mobile phones.

According to the National College Access Network, only 61 percent of high school students file a FAFSA, leaving more than $24 billion in state, federal and institutional aid on the table. Completion of the FAFSA form is one of the best predictors of whether a high school senior will go on to college, as seniors who complete the FAFSA are 63 percent more likely to enroll in postsecondary education.

For the 2019-2010 school year, the FAFSA filing season opens on October 1st and the sooner students file, the better as some financial aid is awarded on a first come, first served basis or from programs with limited funds.

Furthermore, students should look beyond federal student aid as scholarships are a great way to pay for college, and unlike loans they don’t need to be repaid. But winning scholarships takes time, dedication, intensive research, and hard work, especially on the essays. It’s deadline time for college applications, so it’s important to start the application for free money now!

Tuition Funding Sources (TFS) offers access to 7 million scholarships and $41 billion in financial aid. Start by filling in the registration; then with a click, the site searches to find any scholarships for which you might qualify. The more information you provide about yourself, the more matches TFS can make.

Richard Sorensen suggests these tips when applying for financial aid and scholarships:

Tip No. 1: Apply through FAFSA mobile app

The FAFSA mobile app is very simple to use as it asks one question on each page and after answering the question the student goes to the next page and the next question. The student can leave and return to the app as often as they want so it can be completed in several different sittings over a period of time.

Some students don’t apply because they mistakenly think the FAFSA is only for students with financial aid. That’s not accurate, families should know that income is not the only factor used to determine the financial aid they can get. It also depends on the number of children in a family and how many are enrolled in college at the same time.

Tip No. 2: Follow the steps carefully

Even though the FAFSA mobile app is generally easy to use, pay attention to the signature process, because both parents and dependent students are required to sign before the application can be processed. Never tap to “Start Over” button when including a parent signature as this will erase all previous information. And if you need to add a school, click “New Search” not “Next” which moves students to the next question.

Tip No. 3: Submit scholarship applications early

Meet the deadlines and don’t wait until the due date. If the organization asks you to mail the application, don’t try to email it and if there is a maximum word count limit, don’t go over it. Most scholarship providers receive more qualified applications than available funds so reduce your chances of being disqualified because you didn’t follow their requirements.

At TFS undergraduate and graduates can search for scholarships that fit their interest. The majority of the scholarship opportunities featured on TFS Scholarships website come directly from colleges and universities, rather than solely from competitive national pools – thereby increasing the chances of finding scholarships that are the best match for undergraduate, graduate and professional students. Each month TFS adds more than 5,000 new scholarships to its database maximizing the number of opportunities students have to earn funding for their education.

TFS has been helping students for over 30 years and offers more than 7 million individual scholarships and more than $41 billion in aid. Visit tuitionfundingsources.com to learn more.

November is National Scholarship Month NOW is the time to start applying for scholarships

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SALT LAKE CITY–TFS Scholarships is the most comprehensive free online resource for higher education funding connecting students to more than 7 million scholarships representing more than $41 billion in aid.

It was founded in 1987 after Richard Sorensen’s father, an inner-city high school principal, bemoaned the lack of good scholarship resources for his students.

High school seniors now applying for college should also be applying for scholarships, according to Richard Sorensen, an expert with more than 30 years experience helping students find scholarships.

“College bound students should spend four to five hours a week looking for scholarships, starting in the fall of their senior year,” says Sorensen, President of TFS Scholarships. “They should think about finding scholarships like it’s a part time job.”

A scholarship, unlike a student loan, is free money and should always be the first place students look for help in funding their college education. The majority of the scholarship opportunities featured on the TFS Scholarships website come directly from colleges and universities, rather than solely from competitive national pools, thereby increasing the chances of finding scholarships.

“There are new scholarships posted on the site every month, each with different deadlines and time frames,” says Sorensen. “There is plenty of aid out there and a lot of it goes untouched. If a student is diligent, they’ll find it.”

TFS Scholarships also posts a new scholarship opportunity every day on its Twitter, Facebook and Instagram social media accounts (@TFSscholarships), making it easy to find new scholarship opportunities. “We call it ‘The Scholarship of the Day,’” says Sorensen. “Most of the scholarships are available for all students so if a student or their parents follow us, they will have the opportunity to apply for more than 300 scholarships every year from this source alone.”

TFS takes it a step further, digging deeper into localized scholarships. “If you wanted to go to Arizona State, for example, we have scholarships specific to that school,” says Sorensen.

Each month TFS adds more than 5,000 new scholarships to its database in an effort to stay current with national scholarship growth rates – maximizing the number of opportunities students have to earn funding for their education.

Once students have their scholarships in hand, how they manage them can have important implications. It is up to the student to inform the school of the scholarship.

“The truth is, the money is going to be sent to the school in most cases,” says Sorensen. “If the money is going to tuition and books, it’s tax free. But it is taxable if they use it for living expenses. And if students get more money in scholarships than their direct expenses, they get the difference back from the school,” says Sorensen.

The TFS website also provides financial aid information, resources about federal and private student loan programs, and a Career Aptitude Quiz that helps students identify the degrees and professions that best fit their skills.

Thanks to the financial support of Wells Fargo, TFS has remained a free, online service that effectively connects students with college funding resources to fuel their academic future. “Students trust us with a lot of their personal information and we respect that,” says Sorensen. “With TFS, they never have to be worried about being bombarded by spam.”

For more information about Tuition Funding Sources visit tuitionfundingsources.com.

About TFS Scholarships

TFS Scholarships (TFS) is an independent service that provides free access to scholarship opportunities for aspiring and current undergraduate, graduate, and professional students. Founded in 1987, TFS began as a passion project to help students and has grown into the most comprehensive online resource for higher education funding. Today, TFS is a trusted place where students and families enjoy free access to more than 7 million scholarships representing more than $41 billion in college funding. In addition to its vast database that’s refreshed with 5,000 new scholarships every month, TFS also offers information about career planning, financial aid, and federal and private student loan programs as part of its commitment to helping students fund their future. Learn more at tuitionfundingsources.com.

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