4 on-campus jobs that can set you up for success after graduation

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Lab assistant positions offer students interested in the sciences unparalleled professional experience, not to mention high wages. PayScale estimates that college laboratory assistants make around $14.62 an hour on average.

But Lakhani says that working as a lab assistant is worth more than just a paycheck. “If I’m interested in medicine, for instance, it would be a great idea for me to land a place, paid or unpaid, in a professor’s lab,” he says.

Working in a lab can expose students to a wide range of scientific processes and teach them the importance of diligence and attention to detail. More importantly, working as a lab assistant can help students network with professors which can lead to research opportunities. Getting research published alongside a widely respected professor is one of the best things that students in sciences can achieve during their academic careers.

Radio DJ

Its not easy to launch a career in music but if you have your mind made up, then you are going to have to work hard. One of the easiest ways for students to get experience in the music industry is to get involved with their college radio station.

Most college stations have opportunities for first year students to work behind the scenes in operational roles with pathways to more front-facing positions like DJing.

The key to excelling in this position is to take advantage of every chance you get. Your first solo show may be at an awkward time or you may be assigned a genre that isn’t your favorite, but by embracing every opportunity that is thrown your way, you can turn an on-campus job at the college radio station into some serious professional preparation.

Newspaper ad sales

Another way to think about what on-campus job is best for you is to think about what types of skills you want to master. If you are interested in fields like sales or marketing, the school newspaper may offer the perfect job for you.

This job often includes reaching out to local businesses to sell ad space and working with operational teams to create and adjust strategy. Working in ad sales for the newspaper can be an amazing opportunity to get your hands dirty and make real sales. It also can give students the chance to oversee team goals and budgets.

Potential employers want to hear concrete examples of when you have performed a function that is part of a role so if you want to work in sales, you are going to need examples of when you have made sales. The newspaper will give you plenty of opportunities to do just that.

Continue on to read the complete article at cnbc.com

4 Key Steps to Launching a New Career

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Statistics show that the average employee will change jobs at least 11 times in their working life and, for most people, moving into a new role is a fairly manageable transition. But what happens when you change course completely and launch a brand-new career?

Laurence Favier had spent more than 30 years in senior corporate IT roles when she decided it was time for an entirely new vocation. “As retirement approached, I knew it was time for a more fulfilling career. Something that would nurture me as I transitioned into retirement,” Laurence explains.

Drawing upon her decades of executive experience, Laurence is committed to becoming a business and career mentor and Joy of Business company facilitator. But even with her highly relevant background and extensive corporate knowledge, she felt the anxiety that comes with stepping into the unknown.

“Career change brings great fear – particularly the fear of being without a job. But fear is not something to avoid and you can’t let it hold you back from your dreams,” Laurence advises. Workforce experts estimate that every modern worker will make a complete career change at least once in their life. If you are looking to move in an entirely different career direction, Laurence offers the following advice.

  1. Prepare yourself for change

“When you start actively looking for change, you will begin to see and create opportunities. It may be a conversation with an old friend, or an advertisement that suddenly catches your eye – when you are committed to your new career, you will notice possibilities when they present themselves. Also, don’t hesitate to talk openly about your plans and your needs. You may be surprised how willing others are to help you.

  1. Engage Human Resources

“If you work in a large company, it’s quite easy to change careers simply by moving from one department to another. Human Resources teams often identify employees who have the right skills, attitude and willingness to move into a new career, so don’t hesitate to talk about your desires with your manager or HR representative.”

  1. Network, Network, Network

“If you don’t have the opportunities of a large company, all you need is a great network. Make connections with the people you meet – clients, competitors, suppliers, co-workers. All of these people will know you, appreciate your skills and attributes, and trust you. Speak to your network about your career desires and help them, where you can, to obtain theirs.”

  1. Use Social Media

“Social media is a great way to express your desire for a career change and get the advice and assistance you need. Let your personal connections know what your plans are, but also use social media sites such as LinkedIn and Facebook to reach out to professionals who can help you in your new endeavor.”

Importantly, Laurence says “Don’t wait for things to be perfect before taking the leap into a new career. Be confident, ask for help and resources when you need them, but don’t hesitate. And don’t listen to the nay-sayers around you – they will often judge you for the things they’re not capable of doing. In the end, I have found, they will admire you.”

Source: accessjoyofbusiness.com

Explore Your Options: The One-Year or the Two-Year MBA?

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Choosing between a one-year MBA and a two-year MBA should be a simple matter of personal choice. Yet, the reality isn’t so straightforward.

If you wanted to study at a top school in the United States, for example, you would find your selection of one-year MBA programs somewhat limited, although the idea is catching on. The same would apply in Europe if you were looking for a two-year program. So, you may have to compromise on one of these aspects.

The two-year format of the MBA is the long-time precursor of its one-year counterpart, brought into being by the Tuck School of Business back in 1900. The one-year MBA came to prominence in Europe 60 years later. This condensing of the degree might have come as an affront to some leading management experts at the time, but the format gained traction. According to The Graduate Management Admission Council® (GMAC®), a global, non-profit association of leading graduate business schools, in its 2016 Applications Trends Survey, it is becoming the more popular of the two program lengths.

This North American-European divide is still in play, and may well impact your options in terms of program length—be it a decision on the length of program you pursue or one on where you study. Though there are certainly exceptions on both side.

The Two-Year MBA: Time on Your Side

“We haven’t felt comfortable offering a one-year MBA here,” Madhav Rajan, former senior associate dean at the Stanford Graduate School of Business (now at Chicago Booth), told the New York Times back in 2014. “I think there would be huge demand if we ever went that route, but given the content we want to disseminate, that’s not something we’ve pursued.”

This is the big argument for the two- year MBA encapsulated. The two-year program (and remember that ‘two years’ can mean anything from between 16 and 24 months), allows students more time to read, digest, study, and apply what they’ve learned. The schedule may be slightly less intense than a one-year program, leaving more days to participate in extracurricular activities and networking.

A longer MBA program may also mean more opportunity to do electives. MBA programs are composed of the core subjects that need to be covered by all students to obtain a full grasp of management, but there are also chances to specialize. With hundreds of electives available at some schools, students are offered a colorful bouquet of options. If that makes you feel like a kid in a candy store, well … maybe you should look into two-year MBA options.

Career Switchers

Most, if not all, two-year MBA programs feature a summer internship as the filling in the sandwich. For students who have not had a traditional business background or who want to change sector, this can be an excellent opportunity to trial a new industry or job function, without having to commit long-term. Younger students with less work experience may also benefit from the experience the internship can provide.

The One-Year MBA

The one-year MBA benefits two sets of students in particular: those with solid functional experience, and those who know precisely what job they’re aiming for when they set foot on campus.

The one-year MBA can cost as much as 50 percent less than a two-year MBA, and you’ll only have to save up enough money to cover your living costs for one year. Taking one year rather than two out of work also means a great deal less salary lost, too. Nick Barniville is director of MBA and master’s programs at the European School of Management and Technology in Berlin. He explains that, in addition to time and money saving, “all evidence from major rankings suggests that graduates from one-year programs earn roughly the same as those graduating from similarly ranked two-year programs.

“Participants on one-year programs get less vacation and have a more intense work schedule; this can be included as an efficiency benefit because it makes little sense to be paying a lot of money to have free time,” he adds.

Ultimately, the decision is a personal one. How much experience do you have? How sure are you of your future plans? Where do you want to study? Do you want to change careers or just upskill? Consider your options carefully, and make sure that you speak to schools in the process, so you can fully understand which is the right format for you.

Author-Karen Turtle
Source: This article first appeared in TopMBA.com

Aaron I. Bruce Named Vice President and Chief Diversity Officer of ArtCenter College of Design

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Aaron Bruce posing for camera

November 27, 2018, Pasadena, Calif. – ArtCenter College of Design President Lorne M. Buchman announced today that, after a comprehensive international search, the College has named Aaron I. Bruce to the new inaugural role of vice president and chief diversity officer.

With more than 20 years of experience leading initiatives focused on campus diversity, inclusion and international engagement, Bruce will officially begin his tenure at ArtCenter on December 3, 2018, and will lead the establishment of a new Center for Diversity, Equity and Inclusion in Art and Design.

Since 2008, Bruce has served as the chief diversity officer at San Diego State University where he led the implementation of that University’s diversity strategic plan.

“His achievements in curricular redesign, recruitment, retention, marketing and global community programming are all deeply impressive,” said Buchman. “His passion for art and design, together with his extensive record of research and program development in areas of diversity, equity and inclusion, make him an ideal candidate for the job.”

“I’m excited to join such a stellar team of creative giants,” said Bruce. “ArtCenter represents the intersection of some of the most innovative art and design spaces in the world. The journey towards adopting inclusive art and design strategies provides us with the power to collectively change human expression in ways we cannot fully imagine.”

Bruce holds a PhD from the University of Rhode Island and a Masters of International Business Administration from United States International University (Alliant).

As envisioned, the Center for Diversity, Equity and Inclusion in Art and Design will involve students, alumni, faculty and staff, as well as external communities, in robust research, exhibitions, symposia, lectures and curricular expansion on issues of diversity, equity, and inclusion (DEI) in art and design. The proposed Center for DEI will create and support collaborative and transformative activities in the service of the College’s values of DEI that are designed to break new ground through practice, scholarship and pedagogy. In addition, the Center will serve as a partner to ensure that DEI programs, practices and policies for faculty, staff and students are aligned with the College’s strategic plan, values and mission.

“Harnessing creative energy to develop positive change globally is just one of the many characteristics that attract me to ArtCenter. Research shows that embracing the unique identities and lived experiences of artists and designers helps industries achieve higher levels of performance,” said Bruce. “I envision the Center for Diversity, Equity and Inclusion in Art and Design to be a nucleus, where the combined energy of our community helps us thrive. The goal is to build a flexible learning space where diverse research, pedagogy and creative expression is explored. A space where all perspectives are valued, and new skills will be adopted. The end game is to prepare students to be successful creative leaders in a highly diverse and globalized workforce.”

About ArtCenter College of Design

Founded in 1930 and located in Pasadena, California, ArtCenter College of Design is a global leader in art and design education. ArtCenter offers 11 undergraduate and seven graduate degrees in a wide variety of industrial design disciplines as well as visual and applied arts. In addition to its top-ranked academic programs, the College also serves members of the Greater Los Angeles region through a highly regarded series of year-round continuing education programs for all ages and levels of experience. Renowned for both its ties to industry and its social impact initiatives, ArtCenter is the first design school to receive the United Nations’ Non-Governmental Organization (NGO) status. Throughout the College’s long and storied history, ArtCenter alumni have had a profound impact on popular culture, the way we live and important issues in our society.

Discover the Career Opportunity of a Lifetime in Insurance

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No matter what you want to accomplish or experience in life, chances are an insurance career offers the ideal path for you to pursue your goals and passions.

The insurance industry employs more than 2.8 million people in various roles, including art historians, data scientists, drone pilots, marketers, M&A specialists, and of course, actuaries—who ranked their jobs in recent polling as “the best job in the world.” No matter your educational background, or your interests—music, cars, advertising or finance—an insurance career is your gateway to a lifelong opportunity to learn and serve.

And now is an ideal time to explore the many career options insurance offers. Insurance is making huge investments in its future as a leading innovator of practical advancements in Artificial Intelligence (AI), big data, telemetricsm and other emerging technologies. But perhaps our biggest investment is to find the right people. Over the next decade, hundreds of thousands of insurance industry jobs will be available to individuals like you; people who want to embrace and drive discoveries that power insurance’s primary mission: to make communities safer, more resilient, and more productive. And after a loss, to rebuild lives, households and businesses.

There may be thousands of different occupations in insurance, but only one career matters.

Source: Insurance Information Institute

Guillaume to Lead The Crimson’s 146th Guard

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Kristine E. Guillaume ’20 will lead the newly elected 146th Guard of The Harvard Crimson, the organization’s President announced on Monday. Guillaume is the first black woman to serve as President of The Crimson in the paper’s 145-year history.

Guillaume, a joint African American Studies and History and Literature concentrator, is currently one of The Crimson’s Central Administration reporters. In that capacity, she interviewed two successive University Presidents — Drew G. Faust and Lawrence S. Bacow — and worked as part of the reporting team that covered Harvard’s 2018 presidential search.

She is also one of three Chairs of The Crimson’s Diversity and Inclusivity committee, responsible for formulating and overseeing initiatives meant to make the paper more diverse and welcoming to students from all backgrounds. Guillaume, who lives in Lowell House, will begin as President on Jan. 1, 2019.

“I have the utmost confidence in the 146th Guard’s ability to carry on our proud mission of covering and informing Harvard and its affiliates,” current Crimson President Derek G. Xiao ’19 said. “I could not be more excited to see the direction the next President, Managing Editor, and Business Manager will take The Crimson in 2019.”

News writer and designer Angela N. Fu ’20 will serve as Managing Editor, overseeing the production of The Crimson’s daily newspaper, magazine, arts, and sports sections, and blog. Fu, a Government concentrator and Dunster House resident who hails from Birmingham, Ala., currently serves as a Faculty of Arts and Sciences Administration reporter. In that role, she interviewed two successive FAS Deans — Michael D. Smith and Claudine Gay — and helped report on the presidential search along with Guillaume. She also led The Crimson’s Design Board comp for two semesters.

Fu was one of two reporters who broke a story revealing that star Economics professor Roland G. Fryer, Jr. was being investigated separately by Harvard and the state of Massachusetts over allegations of sexual harassment. She faced down a threatened lawsuit to report the piece, which later earned “Honorable Mention” for Associated Collegiate Press 2018 Story of the Year.

Next year’s Business Manager will be Charlie B. Zhu ’20, an Applied Math and Economics concentrator and resident of Winthrop House from Warren, N.J. He will take the helm of The Crimson’s finances and operations after serving this year as a Director of Staff Development for the Business Board. Prior to that, he worked as an Advertising Associate.

Continue onto The Harvard Crimson to read the full article.

How to Answer “So, Tell Me About Yourself”

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Professional Black Man Standing Outside the Office

So, the first question you’re probably going to get in an interview is, “Tell me about yourself.” This is not an invitation to recite your entire life story or even to go bullet by bullet through your resume.

Instead, it’s probably your first and best chance to pitch the hiring manager on why you’re the right one for the job.

A formula The Editor at The Muse likes is called the Present-Past-Future formula. So, first you start with the present—where you are right now. Then, segue into the past—a little bit about the experiences you’ve had and the skills you gained at the previous position. Finally, finish with the future—why you are really excited for this particular opportunity.

Below is an example:

If someone asked, “tell me about yourself,” you could say:

“Well, I’m currently an account executive at Smith, where I handle our top performing client. Before that, I worked at an agency where I was on three different major national healthcare brands. And while I really enjoyed the work that I did, I’d love the chance to dig in much deeper with one specific healthcare company, which is why I’m so excited about this opportunity with Metro Health Center.”

Remember throughout your answer to focus on the experiences and skills that are going to be most relevant for the hiring manager when they’re thinking about this particular position and this company. And ultimately, don’t be afraid to relax a little bit, tell stories and anecdotes—the hiring manager already has your resume, so they also want to know a little more about you.

Continue on to The Muse to read the complete article.

24 Amazing Companies Hiring Right Now

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diverse businesspeople

It’s November, which means it’s the perfect time of the year to reflect on all of the things you’re grateful for. If your job isn’t quite making the cut? Well, it might be time to look for a new gig that reignites your passion.

You’re in luck—because there are plenty of awesome opportunities out there. Check out the 24 companies  pulled together on this list, and prepare to feel a whole new sense of gratitude for your career.

1). GlaxoSmithKline dedicates itself to creating a healthier population the whole world over by researching and developing a broad range of innovative products in pharmaceutical, vaccine, and consumer healthcare arenas. The company boasts commercial operations in more than 150 countries, as well as 89 manufacturing sites and R&D centers in the U.K., U.S., Belgium, and China.

At GSK, you’ll never feel like another cog in a wheel. Employees are encouraged to speak up and seek new experiences—because the company wants to build a workforce of ambitious, assertive leaders. It accomplishes this by offering a multitude of learning and training opportunities beyond existing roles and peer shadowing options at GSK global job sites to make sure its people get ahead and find the right career paths.

2). E*TRADE—a financial services organization—pioneered the online brokerage industry by executing the first-ever electronic individual investor trade. Since then, the company has continued to challenge conventions and put customers first. Today, ETRADE advocates for all investors through its powerful technology and professional guidance.

Made up of a team that’s driven to make things better, E*TRADE is an enterprising company that moves quickly. A “get-it-done” attitude permeates the office culture, as the company values integrity, transparency, and winning over bureaucracy. The hands-on environment makes it easy for employees to continuously build relationships, share new ideas, ask questions, and effect change.

3). Hearst Magazines, a division of Hearst, is the largest U.S. publisher of monthly magazines. With 25 dynamic, industry-leading titles including Esquire, Cosmopolitan, Harper’s BAZAAR, ELLE, Men’s Health, Women’s Health, Good Housekeeping, HGTV Magazine, and O, The Oprah Magazine, Hearst Magazines reaches nearly 137 million readers and site visitors each month—more than two-thirds of all woman and millennial women in the country. The company publishes close to 300 editions and 200 websites around the world. Hearst Magazines Digital Media reaches nearly 100 million site visitors each month and more than 240 million social media followers through its 25 digital brands. Its portfolio also includes Sweet, a collaboration with Snapchat on its Discover platform.

At Hearst, collaboration is key, with those in leadership roles regularly mentoring junior staff while striving to create an atmosphere where sharing ideas and solutions is not only encouraged but expected. Teams work together with the common goal of creating the best media brands they possibly can—engaging, entertaining, informative, and thoroughly inventive.

4). Banfield Pet Hospital, founded as a veterinary practice in 1955, a subsidiary of the Mars corporation, has grown to nearly 1000 hospitals in 42 states, as well as DC and Puerto Rico. Together with its clients—and the millions of pets treated each year—Banfield is working to shape the future of veterinary medicine.

Managers at Banfield work as guiding factors when it comes to leading their teams. They work with their staff to outline what issues need to be solved—but how those solutions are accomplished is left to the discretion of team members. Banfield believes that having faith in associates motivates them to take ownership and deliver excellence.

Continue on to The Muse to read the complete article.

Is a Sustainability Career on Your Green Horizon?

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Woman engineer

In addition to being vital to many people, protecting the environment has become an important goal for many organizations.

A way to achieve this goal is to pursue sustainability, which is using resources to meet present needs without compromising future resources. Although sustainability most often is associated with environmental protection and conservation, it also has social and economic impacts. In fact, many companies adopt sustainability strategies to increase profits, and the environmental aspects become an added bonus.

Sustainability professionals help organizations achieve their goals by ensuring that their business practices are economically, socially, and environmentally sustainable. Sustainability is a diverse field that includes a wide variety of professionals. Sustainability professionals can be business managers, scientists, or engineers; or they can come from other backgrounds. Although their specific career paths might differ, sustainability professionals promote environmental protection, social responsibility, and profitability.

 

What is sustainability?

The most common definition of sustainability comes from a 1987 United Nations (UN) conference. In a report, the UN defined sustainable development as “development that meets the needs of the present without compromising the ability of future generations to meet their own needs.”

Alternately, according to a report from the National Association for Environmental Management, sustainability is “a term that describes a company’s strategies for acting as a responsible corporate citizen, ensuring its operations are financially sustainable and minimizing its environmental footprint. Sustainability initiatives may include natural resource reduction, supply chain management, worker safety and health initiatives, stakeholder engagement and external reporting.” External reporting involves reporting information on a company’s environmental and safety record to the general public, or to government agencies.

The environmental aspect of sustainability focuses on the goals of protecting the environment and the conservation of natural resources. To accomplish these goals, sustainability professionals help organizations, such as businesses, government agencies, and non-profits implement policies to manage the resources consumed and the waste generated by an organization. For example, a sustainability professional might suggest that an organization reduce the amount of packaging it uses when it ships its products, and a reduction in packaging could help the company decrease the amount of raw material it consumes and as the environmental cost of shipping products. Less material used in packaging would cut down on materials cost, as well as weight and space taken up during transport. Since the products would take up less space, there would be fewer shipments. Fewer shipments mean less energy used for shipping products, as well as lower emissions. For example, fewer shipments made by trucks would reduce fuel consumption and lower the amount of exhaust emitted into the air.

To fulfill sustainability’s social aspect, sustainability professionals attempt to minimize the negative effects and to promote the positive effects of the organization’s activities on stakeholders. Stakeholders are persons or groups, such as employees, customers, and citizens of surrounding communities, who have an interest in the organization and its activities. Sustainability professionals work to ensure that the workplace is healthy for employees and that the products or services the organization provides are safe for consumers to use. Some sustainability initiatives affect more than one stakeholder. Many companies promote corporate responsibility where they will provide pro bono products and services to the needy, or make attempts to lessen their environmental impact. For example, although many companies are required by law to keep emissions below a certain level, a sustainability professional might help a utility company lower its smokestack emissions to an even lower level than required. This additional reduction would benefit the health of workers and local citizens, as well as provide the company with positive publicity to entice new customers and retain current ones.

Sustainability can affect current and future profitability. Whether they work for private corporations, government agencies, or non-profits, sustainability professionals strive to ensure that the costs of implementing a sustainability program are worth the expected benefits. Because organizations would not knowingly implement sustainability policies that could cause them to become financially unsound, sustainability professionals help a company’s leaders understand the benefits of implementing such techniques, by explaining future cost savings. For example, energy-saving techniques, such as installing motion detectors and changing light bulbs require an upfront investment but result in future savings.

 

Sustainability issues facing companies today

Many organizations are implementing sustainability measures for a variety of reasons. Sustainability allows companies to increase profits, to manage risks, and to engage stakeholders, such as employees, the local community, and shareholders. By pursuing sustainability, many organizations are able to run more efficiently, improve corporate reputations, retain employees, and have a more positive impact on their communities. In addition, there are other benefits to practicing sustainability. These include minimizing the effects of rising costs for energy; complying with increased regulations at the federal, state, and local levels; and pleasing customers who expect organizations to be environmentally and socially responsible.

Prices for oil, natural gas, coal, and other energy sources have been volatile over the past several decades. Most prices have been on an upward trend with significant fluctuations. Experts believe that U.S. energy prices will continue to climb, because of a limited supply of energy sources (due to a wide range of factors) and increased demand from other countries, particularly China.

Increasing costs have led many firms to seek ways to cut back on the amount of energy used in everyday operations. Companies have been finding new ways to do more with less. This includes reducing the amount of energy used for production and other operations, in addition to finding alternative sources of energy. Alternatives include wind, solar, and biofuels (fuels derived from renewable sources, such as corn, grass, or algae).

Federal and state governments have been enacting climate change regulations. The U. S. Environmental Protection Agency has recently been granted the authority to regulate greenhouse gas emissions, and many states have enacted legislation to limit carbon emissions with the goal of reducing their carbon output. Companies in these states will be under increasing pressure to reduce their carbon footprint (the amount of carbon a company releases into the atmosphere) or face increased regulation and possible fines for their emissions.

Consumers are increasingly paying attention to companies’ environmental records. Consumers base decisions on products or services to purchase at least partially on environmental factors. Companies that have a positive environmental record can appeal to these environmentally sensitive consumers. In addition to consumers, many environmentally conscious businesses and other organizations prefer to work with, or purchase, goods or services from organizations that also are conscious of the environment. Thus, by implementing sustainability measures, companies will be able to appeal to more customers.

Concerns about corporate impact on the environment and local and global communities are being incorporated into strategic business decisions. Sustainability is becoming part of how companies do business in the United States, rather than being viewed as a cost.

 

Who are sustainability professionals?

A job in sustainability encompasses the concept of stewardship—the responsible management of resources. Sustainability professionals seek to improve an organization’s environmental, social, and economic impact. Some have specific titles such as sustainability manager and director of corporate responsibility. Sustainability professionals in other roles may have had experience as industrial managers, logistics (transportation, storage, and distribution) managers, environmental scientists, civil engineers, or recycling coordinators, among others. Many of these workers are dedicated to sustainability, but some may have sustainability responsibilities, in addition to their primary job duties. These workers might implement corporate recycling programs, install equipment to increase efficiency, and monitor processes to ensure their proper function.

There is no set career path for jobs in sustainability—jobs have varying responsibilities across different organizations. For many organizations, sustainability is ingrained in their cultures and is the responsibility of many employees. Thus, these organizations may not have dedicated sustainability staff, but still pursue sustainability.

Many large corporations, some non-profit organizations, and some government agencies employ sustainability professionals. Some organizations do not employ their own sustainability professionals, but still seek advice on sustainability practices. Such organizations frequently hire consultants from sustainability firms to offer specialized skills and services, as well as additional temporary manpower for specific projects.

The Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS) currently does not have data on the number of workers involved in sustainability activities. However, data on employment related to the use of environmentally friendly technologies and practices are available from the Green Technologies and Practices survey. Although many different workers may be involved in carrying out day-to-day sustainability operations, the BLS definition of a green job involved in green technologies and practices is one whose primary duty is related to the use of environmentally friendly production processes. Workers must spend more than half their time involved in researching, developing, maintaining, installing and/or using technologies or practices to lessen the environmental impact of their establishment, or in training other workers in these technologies and practices to be considered in a green job.

 

Management occupations

Sustainability managers come from diverse backgrounds, have different job titles, and perform a broad range of duties. Sustainability managers are responsible for developing and implementing an organization’s sustainability plans and presenting these plans to senior staff. They might also be responsible for ensuring that an organization is in compliance with environmental, health, and safety regulations. Many sustainability managers rely on their public relations and communications skills to work with concerned citizens in local communities.

 

Science occupations

Scientists who work in sustainability devise technical solutions for reducing waste and cutting costs. They assist in the development of strategies to increase safety and to reduce the risk of illness and injury for a company’s employees. Some scientists often serve as advisors to sustainability managers and are involved in performing research to minimize a company’s environmental impact. Many sustainability scientists also serve as consultants, working as technical experts at firms that specialize in providing sustainability services to companies that do not have their own sustainability staff, or those who need specialized knowledge to implement sustainability strategies. Many people with a science background move into management positions and become top-level decision makers in the business community. They use their technical knowledge to guide an organization toward more sustainable practices and are frequently promoted to top-level management positions.

Occupations in scientific research and development have become increasingly interdisciplinary, and as a result, it is common for biological scientists, chemists, materials scientists, and engineers to work together as part of a team. Most scientists work in an office or laboratory and also spend some time in manufacturing facilities with engineers and other specialists. Some scientists, such as environmental scientists or conservation scientists spend a large portion of their time working outdoors, studying the natural environment.

If the growth of sustainability continues, more organizations will employ sustainability professionals. The benefits of this growth should be noticeable in many sectors of U.S. industries, from services, such as finance and health care, to manufacturing and construction.

Sustainability professionals have a broad range of education and experience levels, mainly in science, engineering, and business management. Although many of the occupations with sustainability responsibilities require at least a bachelor’s degree, there are opportunities for individuals with a wide variety of work experience and knowledge.

As sustainability becomes more widespread, new opportunities to contribute to the field will arise. A new market focused on sustainability should build job prospects for more future workers.

 

Source: bls.gov/green/sustainability

Interview With Curtiss Cook, Inspiring Breakout Star of NBC’s New Sci-Fi Drama Series “Manifest”

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Curtiss Cook Manifest actor poses for still picture

You may recognize up-and-coming actor Curtiss Cook as “Radd” in NBC’s “Manifest, or for his recurring roles in Netflix hits such as “House of Cards,” “Luke Cage,” and “Narcos.” He got his start on Broadway in hit shows including “The Lion King” and has not slowed in his drive for success in a field that he considers more of a calling than a choice.

Recently, Black EOE Journal spoke with Cook about what drove him and how he found success in an industry that is still struggling to achieve inclusion and representation.

 

How does diversity play a role in your career and the roles you look for as an actor?

As an actor of color, I guess I get to be the diverse factor in a production that is predominantly not of color. But as for my career, I continue to seek the truth of the character and I strive to bring my uniqueness to each role that I am fortunate enough to get to play.

What advice do you have for other minorities pursuing a career in fields where there might not be a lot of representation?

Being able to act for me wasn’t a choice but more of a calling. With any endeavor that you take on, it’s going to get rough and not go so well at times. However, if you’re betting, the best bet you can place is on yourself! If it is something you really want and were meant to do, then you’ll know. Listen to yourself and be as honest as you can, things always have a way of working themselves out in your best interest.

We are seeing a push for diversity in Hollywood. How does being a black actor impact your roles and how Hollywood perceives you?

I would honestly say I don’t know the true answer because I leave how I’m perceived to whomever, I’m black and that’s all I know. I’ve found myself on many occasions reading for roles where I was the only black person on the list, and I could look at that in the negative or the positive. I choose the latter. The person either likes what I’m selling or they don’t, but what is important is that I love it and I’m going to keep selling it.

Your son is also now pursuing a career in Hollywood and even acting beside you, has that impacted the roles you pursue/choose and how you approach a part?

I’m very proud of my son, and if I taught him nothing else I hope the one lesson he remembers is that there are no shortcuts. Do the work and put in the time, work as hard as you can to meet your own standards then adjust when you need or want to, it’s your choice. Be fair, Be bold, Be honest.

Do you have a motto?

Two come to mind,

If you stay ready you don’t have to get ready.

Dream big but live bigger

Is there anything else you would like our readers to know about you?

I’m an actor who gets to act for a living, my biggest challenges are to make you feel something when I’m on your movie screen, your television, or on the stage. To have you take a journey with me in that short period of time we spend together, I don’t take that lightly. There are more pressing events in your life and the world at any given minute. So that time you decide to share with me I know is valuable and trust me, I treat it as such. You may not like everything I do, but just know you’ll never feel like I DIDN’T GIVE MY ALL.

6 Tips for a Killer Resume

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resume tips

Whether you’re new to the workforce or are looking to make a change, one of the best things you can do for your career is craft a stellar resume. Even if writing isn’t your strong suit, you can still put together a solid resume to entice prospective employers. Here’s how to do it.

1. Craft a compelling opening summary

The opening section of your resume sets the tone for the rest of that document — so it’s important to get it right. Your introductory statement should give a brief, snappy overview of who you are and why you’re such a valuable asset, so use it to draw in your audience and convince those hiring managers to keep reading. Do not, however, mistake your introduction for an objective. “Seeking a role where I can prosper and grow” doesn’t speak to your talents or personality. “Fearless marketer with boundary-pushing tendencies,” on the other hand, is a far more captivating way to start.

2. List your responsibilities and achievements from most to least significant

The folks who receive your resume may not always read it in its entirety. In fact, there’s a good chance they’ll merely skim through it at first, and then go back for a more thorough read once interested. That’s why it’s critical to put your most valuable skills and accomplishments toward the top of each section, where readers’ eyes are most likely to land initially, and stick those mundane, less impressive tasks lower down on the list. Even if you spent most of your time at your last job booking conference rooms and making travel arrangements for other people, if you were given several key projects to run with, highlight those first.

3. Use hard numbers

It’s one thing to boast of your sales prowess, but it’s another to document the extent to which you’ve actually delivered results. That’s why it pays to use hard numbers to highlight your achievements whenever possible. If you increased sales by 20% at your last job, say so — with a number.

4. Don’t list skills that should be a given

It’s 2017, which means that pretty much everyone who works in an office also knows how to use the internet. The same holds true for basic word processing and spreadsheets. Calling out these skills on your resume could be a sign that you’re desperate for content — which might turn prospective employers away. Instead, focus on the skills that make you stand out, and avoid stating what should be the obvious.

5. Show, don’t just tell

It’s hard to pin down your entire career to a one-page snapshot, but thankfully, you don’t have to. If you’ve developed an online portfolio showcasing your work, include a link to it on your resume so that prospective employers know where to look for further detail. It’s one thing to talk about what a wonderful graphic designer you are, but it’s much more powerful to let those hiring managers see for themselves.

6. Keep it clean

In the hiring world, there’s no greater turnoff than a resume laden with errors. Similarly, if your fonts and italics usage are all over the place on the document, your potential employer is bound to notice that sloppiness. Before you submit your resume, examine it thoroughly for stylistic consistency. This means that if you bold the name of a previous employer in one section, you should do the same in another. And though the following should go without saying, for the love of grammar, run your resume through a spell-checking program to ensure that the words it contains are, well, actual words.

Finally, make certain your contact information is both up-to-date and professional. “Beerdrinker52@wazoomail.com” may be a perfectly fine email address to share with your friends, but for resume purposes, you’re much better off with the classic “first name_last name” format.

Though we’re told not to judge books by their covers, there’s no question that those reading your resume will use it to determine whether or not you’re worth pursuing as a job candidate. The more work you put into that document, the more likely it is to help get you hired.

Continue on to The Motley Fool to read the complete article.

5 Better Questions to Ask at the End of an Interview Than “What’s a Typical Day Like?”

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interview

The interview questions you choose to ask at the end of of your meeting tell hiring managers almost as much about you as your answers to their questions.

Unfortunately, the same “good” questions have become more and more widely used, meaning interviewers are now used to being asked things like, “What would my first month on the job look like?” or “What makes someone in this role highly successful?”

Don’t get me wrong, those are great—but they don’t distinguish you from the other candidates.

That’s why I’ve come up with five thoughtful, interesting, and most importantly, new options to pose during your next interview. Not only will you get some good insights, but you’ll be more memorable as well.

1. Which Experience Prepared You the Most for This One, and Why?

What This Says About You: You’ll learn quickly. Rather than starting from scratch, you’ll be actively focusing on applying what you’ve learned in previous positions to your new role.

What This Tells You: From the hiring manager’s answer, you should get a better sense of the office environment and how your future team operates.

Let’s say she responds, “I spent three years working for a small startup—that experience has come in handy, because even though this company is much bigger, we’ve got that startup, ‘If you see it, fix it’ ethos.’”

Well, that very plainly tells you this company values autonomy, humility, and initiative.

2. What Makes This Office Special?

What This Says About You: You’re not just looking for any job. You care about finding the right fit.

What This Tells You: Whether or not this company would be good for you, day in and day out.

Maybe the hiring manager says, “We’re all huge sports fans. Each month, the entire company attends a local game.” If you’d rather clean your bathroom than sit through a single inning of a baseball game, this probably isn’t the company for you.

3. Why Are You Excited About Hiring a New Person in This Role?

What This Says About You: You care about your boss’ goals and how your work will drive the organization forward.

What This Tells You: Whether the hiring manager’s vision of the job aligns with yours, as well as what he or she prioritizes.

For example, you might be jazzed about this project analyst position because you want to identify and solve inefficiences. But the hiring manager says he’s looking forward to having someone be a liaison between multiple departments.

4. I Know One of Your Company Values Is [Value Here]. How Does That Manifest Itself in the Workplace?

What This Says About You: You want to work somewhere with integrity—and you understand the difference between intentions and actions. Also, you did your research!

What This Tells You: If the hiring manager can’t give you a good answer, that’s a clue the organization is, well, talking the talk without walking the walk.

Here’s what a good answer might look like:

“Yes, one of our core values is openness, and openness definitely influences much of how we do things. Every Friday, our entire team gets together for a town hall meeting where anyone can ask anything they’d like. I can’t remember a single time our CEOs have rejected a question. Also, we use Slack to communicate, and unless a conversation is clearly sensitive or confidential, it takes place in one of our public channels.”

5. What’s the Typical Leadership Style Here?

What This Says About You: You’re looking for a productive, mutually beneficial relationship between you and your supervisor.

What This Tells You: Whether or not your working style will mesh with your (maybe) boss’.

Continue on to The Muse to read the complete article

Peace Corps kicks off inaugural HBCU Barbershop Tour

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Peace Corps Barber Shop Tour

Peace Corps launches its first-ever HBCU Barbershop Tour in October with visits to historically black colleges and universities in the District of Columbia, Maryland, Delaware and Virginia. The tour officially kicked off on October 2 at Nile Style Barbershop near Morgan State University in Baltimore.

“In the African American community, the barbershop is the cornerstone of politics, religion, sports, culture, networking and professional development,” said Peace Corps Diversity Recruiter Dwayne Matthews (pictured) a returned Peace Corps volunteer from Little Rock, Arkansas and a graduate of HBCU Norfolk State University in Virginia. “This tour is a chance for the Peace Corps to participate in these conversations – to listen, engage and share information about the opportunities available through volunteer service in an organic and familiar setting.”

The tour will feature 10 stops on HBCU campuses and local barbershops that serve the university population and surrounding communities. Each visit will include stakeholder meetings with university and college staff, class talks and information sessions on campus and panel discussions with returned Peace Corps volunteers and university alumni at local barbershops.

Over 30 percent of Peace Corps volunteers self-report as racially or ethnically diverse, following the agency’s efforts to expand outreach to diverse communities across the United States. The HBCU Barbershop Tour is the Peace Corps’ latest effort to expand opportunities for international service and recruit a volunteer corps that shares the rich diversity of America with communities around the world.

Here is the full October tour schedule with dates and locations:

  1. October 2: Morgan State University and Nile Style Barbershop (Maryland)
  2. October 3: Virginia Union University and Mike Blendz (Virginia)
  3. October 9: Bowie State University and Bowie Town Barbers (Maryland)
  4. October 15: Norfolk State University and Kappatal Cuts (Virginia)
  5. October 16: Virginia State University and Real Cutz (Virginia)
  6. October 22: Hampton University and Just Earl Barbershop (Virginia)
  7. October 23: Howard University and Wanda’s on 7th (Washington, D.C.)
  8. October 24: Delaware State University and J Stylez Barbershop (Delaware)
  9. October 29: University of Maryland, Eastern Shore and Wolf Barbershop (Maryland)
  10. October 30: Coppin State University and Phaze Two Barbershop (Maryland)

About the Peace Corps: The Peace Corps sends Americans with a passion for service abroad on behalf of the United States to work with communities and create lasting change. Volunteers develop sustainable solutions to address challenges in education, health, community economic development, agriculture, environment and youth development. Through their Peace Corps experience, volunteers gain a unique cultural understanding and a life-long commitment to service that positions them to succeed in today’s global economy. Since President John F. Kennedy established the Peace Corps in 1961, more than 230,000 Americans of all ages have served in 141 countries worldwide.

For more information, visit peacecorps.gov

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