The University Of Illinois Launches Program To Create More Black And Latino Male Teachers

LinkedIn

Jawaun Williams always felt a void growing up on the South Side, going to schools with a predominantly black student population.

When he graduated from high school, he was one of the top 15 students in his class and in the honors society.

Still, something was missing.

“I’ve never had the opportunity to be taught by someone who looked like me. I never had any male black teachers,” Williams pointed out.

“I’ve only had one black teacher in my life. It was something I was used to, but as I’ve grown older, I realized that it is pretty weird that black men weren’t in my field.”

Though he wasn’t taught by many black men, Williams saw how influential educators could be in a young person’s life.

“Teachers taught me how to navigate, not only high school, but life. That was one of the reasons why I wanted to become a teacher.” the 19-year-old said.

Williams, a college sophomore, is one of six participants at the University of Illinois at Chicago’s “Call Me MISTER” program that aims to introduce more black and Latino male teachers into the Chicago Public School system.

This is the first year UIC is participating in the program, which stands for Mentors Instructing Students Toward Effective Role Models.”

“Call Me MISTER” started at Clemson University in 2000 and is operating in 31 schools. UIC is the first large urban school participating.

At CPS, 84 percent of the student body population are black or Latino, but 42.7 percent of the system’s teachers are black or Latino.

“As soon as I graduate I want to go back to the South Side of Chicago, and teach in the same neighborhood I came out of,” Williams said.

Williams and others in the “Call Me MISTER” program were recruited at schools with a majority black or Latino student population. They will receive full tuition and room and board.

Continue onto The Chicago Sun-Times to read the complete article.

Former NBA Player Derek Anderson Creates School That Teaches Acts of Kindness, Life Skills and Crisis Management

LinkedIn
Derek Anderson

By Curtis Bunn, Urban News Service

Derek Anderson, the former San Antonio Spurs star, wants to teach black kids how to talk to the police. Growing up virtually homeless in Louisville, Kentucky, Anderson made the unlikely journey from inner-city high school to college basketball star at the University of Kentucky and then an 11-year career in the NBA, crowned by a championship with the San Antonio Spurs.

None of that would have happened, he said, had he not treated people with kindness from his earliest memory. Kindness is transformative.

That insight inspired him to create the Stamina Academy, an after-school and weekend program in his hometown. While free of charge, the school demands a lot from its students, who are boys ranging from fifth grade through twelveth.

The lessons taught are what sets Stamina Academy apart. Instructors present scenarios that students may encounter in everyday life and teach them how to manage potentially explosive encounters—including ones with law enforcement. The scenarios are filmed to be watched and studied.

In one film, a student plays a police officer who has just pulled over another student in a random traffic stop, as often happens in the real world. The pretend-officer challenges the student with increasingly uncomfortable questions. The student-driver learns how to keep calm and avoid feeling provoked.

“They see first hand how something can get out of hand and how something can be avoided,” Anderson said. “They figure that if they respond with respect there could be no escalation to the situation.”

The real-world lessons may be just as valuable as learning to diagram a sentence or remember what happened on July 2, 1776. “It’s just as important that kids have strong life skills as it is they achieve in the classroom,” Anderson said. “We want to produce well-rounded kids who can avoid challenging situations through knowledge and being kind and positive, and who understand it all starts simply with being nice.”

Anderson insists his calm demeanor has carried him through, around and above various situations.Derek Anderson SchoolStaying calm wasn’t easy. His father was not in his life and his mother, who battled drugs, often was not there. “When I wanted a job at the candy store and grocery store, I was kind and polite and it helped me get hired,” Anderson said. “When I needed to sleep at someone’s home, I was kind and grateful. Always. That’s what got me through.”

Anderson uses basketball to lure his 76 students. The former star player takes a hands-on approach to coaching, and his players benefit from his vast experience and know-how.

“And who Derek is as a person is important,” said Rontisha Toney, whose son, Austin, plays basketball and attends Stamina Academy after school and on weekends. “He focuses on the kids as people. He’s positive. He’s patient, always smiling. After practice, the player who performs the best in character and in play gets a belt that he gets to take home for the night. That kind of stuff helps build character and let’s them know it is more than just about the game.”

Anderson is among the most respected citizens in Louisville, largely due to the class and grace he displayed during his basketball career. Now he wants more young players to follow his lead.

He told the story of one of his 13-year-old students approaching an older woman at a Louisville Dairy Queen and paying for her order. “The woman cried,” Anderson said.

“If they perform acts of kindness everyday,” he said, “it becomes a lifestyle. That’s how you make change.”

Stephen Franklin, whose 14-year-old son Miles, attends Stamina and plays for its team, said a gesture by Anderson stood out to him—and validated what he teaches the kids.

“My wife is busy, I’m busy. My daughter is in dance,” Franklin recalled. “And I called D.A [Anderson] to tell him I would be late getting Miles to practice. He shocked me when he said, ‘Want me to go get him?’

“You never hear that from a coach. He’s a great example of what he wants the kids to become. We’re a family about community service and D.A. reinforces the spirit of gratitude.”

Students can spend the night in the Stamina gym, where tents are set up on the basketball court. There is a shower, a sauna and a barber. Anderson provides food and clothes for those who need them.

He guesses he has spent about $60,000 to make phase one of Stamina Academy a reality. He is seeking funds and property to build out a full-scale campus to teach more young men.

“The plan is to make it everything I wish I had growing up,” he said.

“We have to be the example, be positive, to change the way people act, the way people deal with each other,” Anderson said. “I say it all the time: Being kind is the greatest gift in the world.”

###

30-year-old Mareena Robinson Snowden is the first black woman to earn a PhD in nuclear engineering from MIT

LinkedIn

When Mareena Robinson Snowden walked across the commencement stage at Massachusetts Institute of Technology (M.I.T.) on June 8th, she became the first black woman to earn a Ph.D. in nuclear engineering from the storied university.

For her, there was one particular word that the experience brought to mind: grateful.

“Grateful for every part of this experience — highs and lows,” she wrote on Instagram. “Every person who supported me and those who didn’t. Grateful for a praying family, a husband who took on this challenge as his own, sisters who reminded me at every stage how powerful I am, friends who inspired me to fight harder. Grateful for the professors who fought for and against me. Every experience on this journey was necessary, and I’m better for it.”

Snowden’s Ph.D. was the culmination of 11 years of post-secondary study. But the 30-year-old tells CNBC Make It that a career in STEM wasn’t something she dreamed of as a child.

“Engineering definitely was not something I had a passion for at a young age,” she says. “I was quite the opposite. I think my earliest memories of math and science were definitely one of like nervousness and anxiety and just kind of an overall fear of the subject.”

She credits her high school math and physics teachers with helping to expand her interests beyond English and history, subjects she loved.

“I had this idea that I wasn’t good at math and they kind of helped to peel away that mindset,” she explains. “They showed me that it’s more of a growth situation, that you can develop an aptitude for this and you can develop a skill. It’s just like a muscle, and you have to work for it.”

When Snowden, who grew up in Miami, was in the 12th grade and studying physics, she and her dad were introduced to a friend of a friend who worked in the physics department at Florida A&M University. At the time, she says, she was considering colleges and decided to make a visit to the campus.

“We drove up there and it was amazing,” says Snowden. “They treated me like a football player who was getting recruited. They took me to the scholarship office, and they didn’t know anything about me at the time. All they knew was that I was a student who was open to the possibility of majoring in physics.”

Continue onto CNBC News to read the complete article.

Education Enthusiast Creates College Opportunities

LinkedIn
Brannon Jones

By Mel Childs

Brannon Jones has a passion for education. After graduating from Albany State University in 2007, he took his first job at Adamson Middle School in Clayton County as a substitute technology teacher. This is where Brannon discovered that education is his calling.

He has since turned this calling into a business that helps high school youth start planning for college. Next Step Education Foundation, located in Atlanta, Georgia, was founded in November 2011 to help youth develop a college readiness mindset at an early age to tackle the challenges associated with attending college.

“I don’t want lack of finances, resources, or information to hinder a student from getting a college education. Our mission is to give students what they need to help them be prepared to make one of the biggest decisions of their life,” Jones says.

Jones discussed his organization.

Did you feel that you were prepared for college when you attended?
I actually feel that I was unprepared. My parents instilled in me that I was going to college, but we didn’t have the logistical information on what I needed to do to be successful in the process. By happenstance, my mother met an ASU alumnus who nominated me for a summer bridge program that offered college credits and a stipend to students who attended the summer after graduation. Opportunities like this aligned for me to become successful; however, that’s not always the case for students. One thing I always tell students is, ‘If you don’t do the things necessary to help your parents pay for college, you will attend a college your parents can afford.’

What made you switch gears from teaching to helping youth with college readiness?
I took a position in college recruitment after leaving K–12. While working in recruitment, I noticed how ill-prepared many students were. Many students didn’t have a proper support system during the transition to college. I began to expose my applicants and enrollees to opportunities and resources beyond what my institution had to offer, and this is when I realized that I was filling an informational void.

What is the biggest obstacle you have witnessed in the college readiness process?
Student access and awareness by far are the largest obstacles in the college readiness process. Students are coming from all walks of life, family backgrounds, and socio-economic statuses. Unfortunately, pertinent information and opportunities are not disseminated to all areas equally. In my opinion, there’s about a third of high school students who are going to college no matter what obstacles are in their way; there’s about a third of high school students that aren’t going to college no matter how many resources you provide for them; and then there’s a third that may or may not seek a higher education based on environmental factors including access and awareness. I focus on the latter group.

What types of ways does your organization help students with the process of preparing for college?College Readiness 101 Workbook
We truly focus on access and awareness for students. We want to prepare them for the high school to college transition, then directly connect them to all types of institutions of higher education. We do this through a few programmatic platforms:

Virtual College Experience Program – As long as students have a computer, tablet, or smartphone, they can log into our Student Center and watch short research-based videos, complete activities, and download helpful documents to assist them through their college readiness process.

Community Workshops – We have partnered with local agencies, student groups, civic organizations, and community organizers to conduct workshops covering a wide range of college preparation topics including college selection, admissions, financial aid, scholarships, test preparation, money mistakes, and decisions making for college-bound students.

Annual College, Career & Services Fair – Every fall, we host a large fair to expose students to well-known and lesser-known colleges, career professionals and local service providers. Our third Annual Fair in 2016 created 41 on-the-spot college acceptances and 1.7 million in scholarship offers.

College Readiness 101 Workbook – I have recently released my first published resource for students. The College Readiness 101 Workbook is a student research-based book that assists students in strategically choosing their college and major, understanding financial aid and other financing options, as well as provide tips, tools, and resources for them use on their journey. Additionally, the workbook includes a portfolio for students to compare their top five colleges. Through their research, they will be able to articulate the best college for them and the reasons why.

For anyone seeking more detailed information about our organization, I encourage them to visit our website at nextstepeducation.org. We are more than ready to help students get on an organized path in pursuit of higher education.

 

‘Black, queer, disabled and brilliant’: Activist hopes to make history in space

LinkedIn
Eddie Ndopu

Eddie Ndopu wasn’t expected to live past 5 years old. Now, the 27-year-old South African hopes to be the first person with a disability to travel to space.

Eddie Ndopu describes himself as “black, queer, disabled and brilliant.”

“I embody all of the identities that position me at a disadvantage in society,” he told NBC News. “But I am turning that on its head.”

By the end of the year, the 27-year-old South African hopes to become the first person with a disability to go to space.

When Ndopu was 2 years old, he was diagnosed with Spinal Muscular Atrophy (SMA), an incurable condition that causes progressive muscle degeneration and weakness. His prognosis was devastating: His family was initially told he would not live beyond the age of 5.

But a tenacious Ndopu said it wasn’t long before he was able to “outstrip and outlive all expectations,” both academically and medically. He attributes this in part due to his mother, whom he said never gave up on him or stopped fighting for him.

Ndopu said when he was 7 years old and living in Namibia (he moved to neighboring South Africa when he was 10), his mom came home to find him sitting in front of the television staring despondently at a blank screen. “She held my head in her hands and begged me to tell her what was wrong,” Ndopu recalled.“Finally, I told her all I wanted was to go to school.”

Despite inclusive education laws, growing up disabled in southern Africa meant a mainstream education was never guaranteed. In fact, a 2017 United Nations report revealed that even today, 90 percent of disabled children in developing countries never see the inside of a classroom.

But Ndopu said his mom is a “fearless warrior” who knocked on “every door” until finally he was accepted to a small elementary school on the outskirts of his hometown.

Ndopu has so far outlived his prognosis by more than two decades, and last year he became the first African with a disability to graduate from Britain’s prestigious University of Oxford. The disability-rights activist, who admits he has a weakness for lipstick and fashion, said he is “a living manifestation of possibility.”

Now Ndopu, whose disease has left him unable to walk, has set himself a new “audacious” goal: to become the first person with a disability to go to space.

Backed by the United Nations, he hopes to deliver “the speech of [his] life,” championing disability rights from a space shuttle to the UN’s New York headquarters this December.

Phumzile Mlambo-Ngcuka, a South African lawmaker and the executive director of UN Women, told NBC News if Ndopu attains his goal, it would be “a powerful symbol to demonstrate that people with disabilities can break barriers.”

“By reaching space,” she added, “it clearly demonstrates that determined disabled people, in an enabling environment, can excel like anyone else.”

Continue onto NBC News to read the complete article.

Wells Fargo and Tuck School of Business Announce Scholarship Program for Diverse Businesses

LinkedIn

Wells Fargo Announces $100,000 scholarship fund for diverse business owners to attend Tuck School of Business Minority Business Programs.

Wells Fargo’s Scholarship recipients attended Tuck’s Growing the Minority Business to Scale 2017 cohort

Wells Fargo today announced it is extending its investment in diverse business development amounting to over $200,000 impacting 48 diverse businesses in the past two years. The Wells Fargo Scholarship Fund for Diverse Businesses in collaboration with the Tuck School of Business. Funds 24 scholarships per year for the Tuck School of Business Minority Business Programs, certified minority, women, veteran, LGBT and disabled owned business entrepreneurs will be able to attend Tuck.

“We’re proud to continue our work with the Tuck School of Business Minority Business Program,” said Regina O. Heyward, senior vice president and head of Wells Fargo Supplier Diversity. “Diverse-owned businesses create jobs and support families and communities in every small town and big city in the U.S. At Wells Fargo, we’re focused on growing diverse businesses by offering executive training, providing access to capital, and working with external organizations to broaden opportunities that will benefit diverse-owned businesses, which are so vital to our country’s economy.”

Diverse businesses are starting and scaling at an increasing high rate in the U.S. In 2017, Wells Fargo spent $1.27 billion with certified diverse suppliers. Wells Fargo has focused on two strategic areas: growing spend with certified diverse suppliers and working with business development organizations and the community to help build a strong network of diverse suppliers.

Tuck’s Minority Business Program started in 1980 and is the oldest program designed to develop diverse business owners at an academic graduate business school. Since its inception, more than 7,000 business owners have participated in the programs. “Tuck MBE Programs is very excited about this expanded relationship with Wells Fargo that allows us to bring our curriculum, faculty and 37 years of experience developing diverse businesses to even more entrepreneurs from diverse communities from across the county,” said Len Greenhalgh Faculty Director and Professor of Management, Tuck School of Business at Dartmouth.

Continue onto LinkedIn to read more about this collaboration.

Tuskegee names Lily D. McNair as its 8th president

LinkedIn

Dr. Lily D. McNair will become Tuskegee University’s eighth president after being unanimously selected by its Board of Trustees. She will serve as the first female president of the institution in its 136-year history.

McNair currently is provost and senior vice president for academic affairs at Wagner College in New York City. She will begin her duties at Tuskegee on July 1, 2018.

“When we launched our presidential search last October, our goal was to identify someone who could champion both Tuskegee’s historic legacy and her place in the future of higher education,” said John E. Page, chair of Tuskegee’s Board of Trustees. “Our Board of Trustees is confident that Dr. McNair brings to Tuskegee the precise skill set required to ensure we continue thriving as one of the nation’s leading HBCUs.”

Since 2011, McNair has served as the second-ranking executive of Wagner College — a private college of 2,200 students located on New York City’s Staten Island. A clinical psychologist by training, Dr. McNair’s higher education career includes other academic, research and executive appointments at Spelman College, University of Georgia, the State University of New York at New Paltz, and Vassar College.

A native of New Jersey, Dr. McNair holds an undergraduate degree in psychology from Princeton University, and master’s and doctoral degrees in psychology from the State University of New York at Stony Brook.

Burt Rowe, a 1970 Tuskegee graduate, president of the Tuskegee National Alumni Association Inc., and search committee member, attested to McNair’s collaborative approach to engaging alumni, donors and other university stakeholders.

“I am honored and excited to welcome Dr. McNair to the Tuskegee family. She is a trusted and well-respected leader who understands Tuskegee’s unique heritage, culture and traditions,” Rowe said. “Deeply engaging and collaborative, she is committed to ensuring that all voices of the Tuskegee family will be heard, and I am confident that alumni will enjoy working with Dr. McNair to continue moving ‘the pride of the swift-growing South’ forward.”

Continue onto the Tuskegee University Newsroom to read the complete article.

4 Tips to Consider When Comparing Financial Aid Packages

LinkedIn
diverse collge students

According to the U.S. Department of Education, 20 percent of undergraduate students did not apply for financial aid in 2011-12.

Across all types of institutions, students’ top reasons for not applying for financial aid, and thus leaving financial aid on the table, were that they thought they were ineligible for such support and they thought they could afford college without financial aid.

Students who apply for financial aid receive their financial aid letters in late March and early April. Most students will have until the May 1 National Candidates Reply Date to decide whether to accept the college’s admissions offer and financial aid.

Here are four things for families to consider when comparing financial aid packages:

  1. What are my total costs to pay for college? What other costs such as textbooks, room and board, commuting to campus, personal expenses do I need to be prepared for?
  2. How much will I need to repay after college and how long will it take to pay back my loans?
  3. Are there factors such as significant changes in family income and grade point average that might cause my financial aid to change after the first year?
  4. How do each school’s financial aid offers differ? This will help determine which school is the most affordable.

Need extra money to help pay for college? TFS Scholarships has been helping students for over 30 years and offers more than 7 million individual scholarships and more than $41 billion in aid. Visit tuitionfundingsources.com to learn more.

5 Tips for Winning Scholarship Applications

LinkedIn
TFS Scholarships

Scholarships are a great way to pay for college, and unlike loans they don’t need to be repaid. But winning scholarships takes time, dedication, intensive research, and hard work—especially for essays.  It’s deadline time for college applications, so it’s important to start the search for free money now!

The Internet has made the search easy and free, and scholarship databases like Tuition Funding Sources (TFS) offers access to 7 million scholarships and $41 billion in financial aid. Start by filling in the registration; then with a click, the site searches to find any scholarships for which you might qualify. The more information you provide about yourself, the more matches TFS can make.

Undergraduate and graduate students can search for scholarships that fit their interests. The majority of scholarship opportunities featured on TFS Scholarships come directly from colleges and universities, rather than solely from competitive national pools – thereby increasing the chances of finding scholarships that are the best match for students. Each month TFS adds more than 5,000 new scholarships to its database, maximizing the number of opportunities students have to earn funding for their education.

Richard Sorensen, President of TFS, suggests these tips when applying for scholarships:

  1. Apply for smaller scholarships

Many students look for scholarships that offer big awards but those are also the most competitive. Scholarships with smaller awards are easier to obtain because fewer students are competing for them. These scholarships can help with college costs such as books and living expenses.

  1. Customize your essay

Scholarship judges can tell if you’ve adapted a previously written essay to meet their criteria. Customize your application and use the beginning of your essay to showcase your personality and set yourself apart. Remember, the time you are spending to tailor your essay can be rewarded with a college debt free future.

  1. Submit scholarship applications early

Meet the deadlines and don’t wait until the due date. If the organization asks you to mail the application, don’t try to email it and if there is a maximum word count limit, don’t go over it. Most scholarship providers receive more qualified applications than available funds, so reduce your chances of being disqualified because you didn’t follow their requirements.

  1. Follow your passion

Apply for scholarships that fit your passion and interest. TFS has scholarships for everyone. The more personal the scholarship the higher your chances of winning!

  1. Increase your submission rate

The more applications you submit, the greater your chances are of winning scholarships. Treat applying for scholarships as a part-time job. Organize your free time and try to work on submitting one scholarship application every week and more during weekends. Remember if you spend 100 hours on submitting applications and win scholarships for $10,000 that is a really good part-time job!

TFS has been helping students for over 30 years and offers more than 7 million individual scholarships and more than $41 billion in aid. Visit tuitionfundingsources.com to learn more.

He applied to 20 of the best colleges and got a full ride to all of them

LinkedIn

Micheal Brown stared at the acceptance letter in front of him: It said yes.

So did the next one. And the one after that.

The 17-year-old from Houston applied to 20 of the best universities in the US. He was admitted to every single one with a full ride and $260,000 in additional scholarship offers.

“It’s something I’m proud of because I see my hard work paying off, determination paying off, sacrifices paying off,” the student told CNN.

Of those 20, he listed his top eight choices as: Harvard, Princeton, Northwestern, Yale, University of Pennsylvania, Stanford, Georgetown and Vanderbilt.

Currently a senior at Mirabeau B. Lamar High School, Micheal has been heavily involved in his school’s debate team, mock trial and student government for years. He has also volunteered for political campaigns, citing his interest to “the moment I saw Barack Obama get elected.”

He is set on majoring in political science, but is also considering a second degree in economics.

The first letter

When he received his first acceptance in December, he chose to do it at a friend’s house to relieve the pressure of being around his whole family.

“My family had high expectations and maybe didn’t realize how competitive the process is,” he said.

But he still invited his biggest supporter to come along — his mom.

Berthinia Rutledge-Brown filmed as Micheal stood in shock by the computer while his friends excitedly rallied around him.

Stanford, of course, said yes.

“After sixth grade, Mike was in control of his education,” recalled the proud mom. “He was focused, he knew what he wanted and he made his own decisions.”

Continue onto CNN to read the complete article.

First Museum Committed to Sharing the Stories of Historically Black Colleges Opens

LinkedIn
historically black colleges

The HBCU Museum in Washington, D.C., launched March 9 and has plans to expand to a second location in Atlanta.

In the mid-19th century, when just a scattering of traditionally white colleges in the United States were willing to accept black applicants, the first historically black colleges— the Institute for Colored Youth founded in 1837 (now Cheyney University of Pennsylvania), the Ashmun Institute in 1854 (now Lincoln University), and Wilberforce University in 1856—emerged to give African Americans access to higher education.

Though the end of the Civil War in 1865 brought the freedom and momentum for African American education to expand throughout the country, namely in the South, black students were largely still blocked from traditional instutions. So they continued to have to create their own.

According to ​Samara Freemark of American RadioWorks, black ministers and white philanthropists opened schools in church basements and people’s homes to give formerly enslaved individuals eager to learn an education in the South and beyond.

Some of these school eventually blossomed into full-fledged colleges and universities, and more than 100 of them, collectively known as historically black colleges and universities, or HBCUs, still exist today. And now, the first museum in the world dedicated to highlighting HBCUs has opened its doors, Anne Branigin reports for The Root.

Visitors at the museum, located in a 638-square-foot storefront on 7610A Georgia Ave NW, Washington, D.C., can see the history and impact of HBCUs on black culture in America through historic photos and memorabilia from the schools and some of their best-known graduates.

In an interview with the Washington Business Journal’s Rebecca Cooper, executive director Terrence Forte says he wants the museum to “bridge the gap for those who might not know about historically black college and universities’ stories.” Forte, who founded the museum with his family (both of Forte’s parents are graduates of Howard University), says the opening of the space, which serves as a welcoming center, is the first phase of a four-stage plan to open a larger for-profit museum in the D.C.

According to Smithsonian’s National Museum of African American History and Culture, more than 90 HBCUs were established between 1861 and 1900. (HBCUs are defined by the Higher Education Act of 1965 as a college or university established before 1964 with the mission of educating black Americans.)

Since then, black colleges have been responsible for some of the country’s most successful doctors, scientists and engineers. Though HBCUs represent just around 3 percent of colleges and universities in the U.S., according to 2016 statistics by the U.S. Department of Education, they’re responsible for 27 percent of African-American students graduating with bachelor’s degrees in STEM fields.

Continue onto the Smithsonian to read the complete article.

Linda Brown, Center Of Brown v. Board Of Education, Dies At 76

LinkedIn

Linda Brown was the young girl at the center of the 1954 Brown v. Board of Education Supreme Court decision that would end legal school segregation.

Linda Brown, the young girl at the center of the 1954 Brown v. Board of Education Supreme Court case, died on Monday at the age of 76.

Brown’s sister, Cheryl Brown Henderson, confirmed the death to the Topeka-Capital Journal. Peaceful Rest Funeral Chapel of Topeka independently confirmed Brown’s death with HuffPost.

“Sixty-four years ago a young girl from Topeka brought a case that ended segregation in public schools in America,” Kansas Gov. Jeff Colyer tweeted Monday. “Linda Brown’s life reminds us that sometimes the most unlikely people can have an incredible impact and that by serving our community we can truly change the world.”

It was Brown’s father, Rev. Oliver Brown, who sued the Topeka school board to allow his daughter the right to attend an all-white school in the Kansas capital city. Four other school segregation cases were combined with Brown’s to be heard by the Supreme Court, but the justices’ unanimous ruling was named for Brown.

Brown, who was also known as Linda Carol Thompson after her marriage in the mid 1990s, was forced to attend an all-black school far away from her home even though an all-white school was only blocks away.

Brown told MSNBC in 2014 that she remembered the embarrassment of being separated from her neighborhood friends and the long walk to the bus stop.

“I remember a couple of times turning around and going back home because I — you know, it was a small town,” she said. “I got really, really cold and would get home and be crying. And mother would, you know, she would try to warm me up and tell me it would be all right and everything.”

The Supreme Court ruled unanimously in favor of Brown. In its decision, the court overturned the 1896 “separate but equal” ruling in Plessy v. Ferguson, marking the case as one of the biggest legal victories of the civil rights era. It was due to Brown v. Board of Education that the federal government could force states to integrate schools, allowing children of color the opportunity for an equal education to white children.

Brown credited her father and the other families who took their cases to court for removing the “stigma of not having a choice” during a 1985 interview for the PBS documentary series “Eyes on the Prize.”

“I feel that after 30 years, looking back on Brown v. The Board of Education, it has made an impact in all facets of life for minorities throughout the land,” Brown said during the interview. “I really think of it in terms of what it has done for our young people, in taking away that feeling of second class citizenship. I think it has made the dreams, hopes and aspirations of our young people greater, today.”

Continue onto the HuffingtonPost to read the complete article.

How to Avoid Scholarship Scams

LinkedIn
Scholarships

It’s no secret that scholarships are a great way to find free money for college. While it’s now easier than ever to search for scholarship opportunities online, easier navigation on the internet also makes it easier for online scammers.

Unfortunately, many families have fallen victim to scholarship scammers who are stealing millions of dollars from families every year. Your goal is to get money for college, and it shouldn’t cost you anything to apply for scholarships.

The good news is that there are red flags to look out for to avoid becoming the victim of a scholarship scam. A general rule of thumb – if it sounds too good to be true, it is. Learn the signs to protect yourself against being defrauded and find scholarships that are right for you. Here are 3 tips to avoid scholarship scams:

  1. Be cautious of fees: Applying for scholarships should not cost money. Be cautions of scholarships with application fees and never pay to get scholarship information. Scholarship databases are free and readily available online. Be on the lookout for phrases like “Guaranteed or your money back.” Scholarship websites can’t guarantee that you will win a scholarship because they’re not deciding on the winner. Legitimate scholarships won’t require an upfront fee when you submit the application.

TFS Scholarships

  1. Protect your data: Never reveal financial information such as your social security number, credit card numbers, checking information or bank account numbers to apply for scholarships. Scholarship scammers could use this information to commit identity theft.
  1. Get a second opinion: If you’re still unsure, talk with trusted organizations about which websites they recommend. School counselors, librarians, financial aid offices, and local community organizations have knowledge and tools to guide you in the right direction.

To help cut through the clutter, TFS Scholarships provides free educational resources to ease the academic journeys of students and families around the country. Sponsored by Wells Fargo, TFS Scholarships has been helping students for over 30 years and offers more than 7 million individual scholarships and more than $41 billion in aid. Visit tuitionfundingsources.com to learn more.

America's Leading African American Business and Career Magazine