Two Women Refereed An NBA Game Together For The First Time Ever

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Two black women did something this week that no other women have done before: They refereed a professional basketball game together.

Danielle Scott and Angelica Suffren officiated an NBA Summer League game between the Los Angeles Lakers and the Miami Heat on Tuesday evening. Marc J. Spears, a senior writer for ESPN’s The Defeated website, pointed out the news in a Tuesday tweet.

“First time I’ve ever seen two black women referee an NBA game of any kind,” Spears wrote. “Violet Palmer would be proud Danielle Scott and Angelica Suffren reffing at the California Classic Summer League Lakers versus Heat.”

NBA spokesman Mike Bass confirmed to HuffPost that this was the first time two women have officiated an NBA game.

Palmer, a retired basketball referee, broke the NBA’s gender barrier in 1997 when she and Dee Kanter were hired. Palmer was the first woman to officiate an NBA game ― on Oct. 31, 1997, between the Vancouver Grizzlies and the Dallas Mavericks. She was also the first woman to ref an NBA playoff game ― between the Indiana Pacers and the New Jersey Nets on April 25, 2006.

Twitter users applauded the historic moment this week.

“Now, it’s time to have a woman coach,” one user wrote.

Continue onto the Huffington Post to read the complete article.

Tyra Banks Will Open Supermodel-Themed Amusement Park, ‘ModelLand’

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Get ready to “smize”…

OG supermodel Tyra Banks recently announced that later this year she will be expanding her modeling brand with a new project called ModelLand — and it’s not at all what you think. Unless you thought it was a theme park, in that case, you were right on the money!

“I’ve always been insanely inspired by attractions like Disneyland and Universal Studios and have wanted to bring that spirit of adventure and storytelling to the world of modeling,” Tyra shared with Variety. “But not the exclusive modeling industry. I’m talking about modeling for the masses.”

The 45-year-old recently announced on Instagram that she has been working on a fantasy version of the modeling world for the past 10 years and that she’s extremely excited to share it with the world.

“My dream for you will soon be a reality. #ModelLand. A place where everyone can be a model,” she posted on Instagram. “A place where all beauty is celebrated. I can’t wait for you to Step Into Your Light. Head over to Model-Land.com to sign up for more information. Link in bio. #ModelLand @modelland.”

The first-of-its-kind experiential attraction is set to be open late 2019 housed in Macerich’s Santa Monica Place, the iconic multi-level 21,000 sq. ft. open-air shopping, dining and entertainment destination just blocks from the beach in Santa Monica.

For the complete article, continue on to BET.

Brian Flores Ready To Join Dolphins’ All-Black Leadership Team

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Not sure if the NFL has ever had a minority head coach from Brownsville, Brooklyn, but New England Patriots defensive play-caller Brian Flores will fit that mold when he assumes the head coaching position with the Miami Dolphins.

Flores is a living example that the American Dream is still very much alive.

Once highly-touted defensive coordinator Matt Patricia left to become head coach of the Detroit Lions after the Patriots lost to Philadelphia in the Super Bowl, Flores was awarded the defensive play-calling responsibilities in addition to his job as linebackers coach. He had huge shoes to fill.

On Sunday, Flores, the son of immigrant parents from Honduras, had the kind of slam dunk final interview that a hunch could never satisfy.

“You don’t get to be defensive signal caller under Bill Belichick unless you know your stuff,” NFL sideline announcer Tracy Wolfson said in a flattering appraisal of Flores’ efforts during the Patriots’ 41-28 thrashing of the LA Chargers in Sunday’s AFC Divisional Playoff game.

The Patriots defense stifled the No. 6 scoring offense in the league behind a variety of blitz packages and defensive alignments. Now Flores and the Patriots will look to suppress the Chiefs offense, who finished No. 1 in the league in 2018.

Dolphins owner Steve Ross and general manager Chris Grier have seen enough. They intend to offer their vacant head coaching position to Brooklyn native.

Despite the owners’ whitewashing of the NFL head coaching ranks, the Dolphins seem to be on a progressive plane of their own. Miami would be the only NFL team to have a black/Hispanic coach, black general manager and assistant GM. Grier will remain the GM next season and Miami just hired former Buffalo Bills scout Marvin Allen to assist him.

For the complete article, continue on to The Shadow League.

The Breakthrough: How Jackie Robinson Proved He Belonged

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Fifty years ago, over fourteen games in May, Jackie Robinson erased any doubt that he belonged in the majors, clearing the path for other black players.

In the middle of the cool, drizzly afternoon of Sunday, May 25, 1947, as the Brooklyn Dodgers led the Philadelphia Phillies 4–3 in the eighth inning, Jackie Robinson ground his spikes into the rain-softened dirt of the batter’s box at Ebbets Field, turned to face Phillies reliever Tommy Hughes and waited for Hughes’s 3-and-1 cripple.

Forty days had passed since Robinson donned a Dodgers uniform and became the first black man in this century to play in the majors, going 0 for 3 in his debut at Ebbets on April 15. In recent games the 28-year-old rookie had begun to evince signs of settling down and playing the crisp, commanding brand of ball that Branch Rickey, the Dodgers’ president, had predicted of him. “You haven’t seen the real Robinson yet,” Rickey had been telling writers all spring. “Just wait.”

Through his first 30 big league games, played in six National League cities, the rookie had alternately struggled and soared, at times performing brilliantly at first base (a position new to him that year) but often pressing at the plate. Of course, Robinson had also been the target of racial epithets and flying cleats, of hate letters and death threats, of pitchers throwing at his head and legs, and catchers spitting on his shoes. In the midst of all this bristling animus, there was a circuslike quality to Dodgers games, with Robinson on display like a freak; with large crowds, including many blacks, lustily cheering even his dinkiest pop-ups; and with the daily papers singling him out as the “black meteor,” the “sepia speedster,” the “stellar Negro,” the “muscular Negro,” the “lithe Negro” and “dusky Robbie.”

“More eyes were on Jackie than on any rookie who ever played,” recalls Rex Barney, a Brooklyn reliever that year. It was a wonder, as he endured the mounting pressure of his first weeks in the bigs, that Robinson could perform at all. Yet perform he did, putting together a 14-game hitting streak in the first 2 1/2 weeks of May. By May 25, with the first extended road trip behind him and the novelty of his presence on the wane, Robinson was sensing what he later called a “new confidence” in his game. As he took the field that day against the Phillies—who, led by their Southern-born manager, Ben Chapman, had lacerated him with taunts of “nigger” and “black boy” from the dugout during their first series in April—Robinson had begun to feel, as he would put it, “some of the old power returning.”

In the fourth inning, with the Dodgers down 2–0 and their shortstop, Pee Wee Reese, on first, Robinson lashed a single to right center off Phillies starter Dick Mauney. Moments later Reese and Robinson raced home when Dodgers centerfielder Pistol Pete Reiser crashed a double off the left-centerfield wall. Two innings after that, with Reese again on first and Hughes now pitching, Robinson reached for a fastball and lined a single to left. Reese later scored when Hughes balked him home from third.

Having been at the center of the rallies that gave Brooklyn that tenuous one-run lead in the eighth, Robinson now dug in against Hughes and worked the count to 3 and 1. Hughes delivered a fastball high in the strike zone, fat as a melon, and Robinson turned all his 195 pounds into it, striking the ball harder than he had struck one all spring. Dick Young, the Dodgers’ beat reporter for the New York Daily News, mixed jazz with golf in search of a simile to describe the blast, rhapsodizing that the ball left home plate “like something out of Louis Armstrong’s trumpet. It started on a low line, took off suddenly like a golf drive and zoomed far back into the lower leftfield deck.”

The Dodgers won 5–3, and contemporary accounts viewed the game as Robinson’s breakthrough in that young season, fulfilling Rickey’s prophesy that when the real Robinson at last arrived, he would be worth all the waiting. No one on that afternoon in May appeared more relieved than Burt Shotton, the Dodgers’ manager. “He has finally become relaxed and is playing the kind of ball that earned him his major league chance,” Shotton said. “Until today we just couldn’t get him to take a normal cut at the cripples they were getting him out on. Time after time we gave him signals to hit the 3-and-1 pitch, but very often he didn’t even swing. Guess he had too much on his mind.”

Despite all he had on his mind, despite all he had endured during the early days of that long season, it had grown clear by mid-May that Robinson, even a struggling Robinson, was in the Brooklyn lineup to stay. “The guy just had too much talent,” says Reese, “and too much guts.” Indeed, Robinson had won over teammates and opponents alike during his 14-game hitting streak, which was all the more impressive because it was a direct response to a horrible slump that would have finished lesser men in his situation.

Continue onto Sports Illustrated to read the complete article.

Gladys Knight will sing the national anthem at Super Bowl LIII

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Gladys Knight, the “Empress of Soul” and an Atlanta native, will sing the national anthem preceding Super Bowl LIII on Feb. 3 in the city’s Mercedes-Benz Stadium.

“I am proud to use my voice to unite and represent our country in my hometown of Atlanta,” Knight said in a statement released by the NFL. “The NFL recently announced their new social justice platform ‘Inspire Change,’ and I am honored to be a part of its inaugural year.”

Inspire Change, according to the league, is designed to showcase the community work being done by players, owners and the league.

Knight has won seven Grammy awards and is a member of the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame, with No. 1 singles “Midnight Train to Georgia” and “That’s What Friends Are For,” and her 11 No. 1 R&B singles, including “I Heard It Through the Grapevine.”

Continue on to Washington Post to read the complete article.

Taraji P. Henson to be honoured with star on the Hollywood Walk Of Fame

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Taraji P. Henson will be honoured with a star on the Hollywood Walk Of Fame.

The Oscar-nominated American actress and singer, 48, is known for starring in films including The Curious Case Of Benjamin Button, Date Night and the 2010 remake of The Karate Kid.

Henson, who also has an extensive career in television, will be honoured in the category of motion pictures with a star on Hollywood Boulevard.

Ana Martinez, producer of the Walk Of Fame, said: “Taraji P Henson is a powerful woman and a powerful actress.  She is an entertainer that fans cannot take their eyes off of due to her great acting ability.

“We welcome her bright star on our Walk Of Fame.”

Boyz In The Hood director John Singleton and rapper Mary J Blige will speak at the ceremony, which is due to take place on January 28.

Washington DC-born Henson began her Hollywood career working as an extra in television shows before getting her big break in the 2001 comedy-drama film Baby Boy, starring alongside Tyrese Gibson.

In 2008 she starred opposite Brad Pitt in David Fincher’s The Curious Case Of Benjamin Button, playing the mother of a disabled child.

Henson was nominated for an Academy Award for best supporting actress for the role. Last year she voiced a character in Disney’s animated film Ralph Breaks The Internet and will appear in comedy What Men Want in February.

Continue onto The Independent to read the complete article.

Louisville International Airport To Be Renamed For Muhammad Ali

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The city where the legendary boxer and humanitarian grew up is proud to honor him, Mayor Greg Fischer said.

Legendary sports figure Muhammad Ali is being honored by his Kentucky home town.

On Wednesday, officials announced that Louisville International Airport will be renamed after the late boxer and humanitarian.

The new name will be Louisville Muhammad Ali International Airport, although the current three-letter code ― SDF ― will stay the same, according to the Courier-Journal.

Louisville Mayor Greg Fischer said the name change reflects the city’s pride in a local son who has “left a legacy of athleticism, of humanitarianism that has literally inspired billions of people.”

Although the airport is already planning to spend $100,000 to promote the new name, it’s not totally set in stone: The change first needs to be approved by the Federal Aviation Administration, according to local station WDRB TV.

WDRB TV reported that a related deal also needs to be finalized with an Ali family entity. But his boxer’s widow, Lonnie Ali, seems to be onboard, judging from this statement released to the press:

I am proud that the Louisville Regional Airport Authority and the City of Louisville are supportive of changing the name of the Louisville International Airport to reflect Muhammad’s impact on the city and his love for his hometown.

I am happy that visitors from far and wide who travel to Louisville will have another touch point to Muhammad and be reminded of his open and inclusive nature, which is reflective of our city. Muhammad was a global citizen, but he never forgot the city that gave him his start. It is a fitting testament to his legacy.

Ali died in 2016 after a long battle with Parkinson’s syndrome. He was 74.

Not only was he the first boxer to win the world heavyweight title three times, but Time magazine once described him as the “best-known person on the planet.”

Continue onto the Huffington Post to read the complete article.

NBCBLK launches Black History Month Series: ‘She Thrives’

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She Thrives Series

This February 2019, in celebration of Black History Month, NBCBLK, the African-American news vertical of NBC News Digital, presents a month-long special feature recognizing the accomplishments, power and prowess of black women.

The series, “She Thrives: Black Women Making History Today,” will highlight 10 amazing women you should know from a variety of generations, occupations and regions. These women are leaders in their communities and truly elevating the conversation around black identity, politics and culture.

NBCBLK would love to obtain submissions and suggestions. Once submissions are compiled, editorial members throughout NBC News’ broadcast and digital platforms will make the final selections.

How it works:

Tell us in the form provided how the woman you wish to nominate is breaking barriers and dismantling stereotypes about what it means to be a Black Woman in America today. Include a link, if relevant.

Selection criteria:

• Honorees are black women who are exceptional, gifted leaders in their industry and profession.

• These women are breaking barriers and smashing stereotypes about the black community/diaspora- redefining what it means to be Black in America.

Continue onto NBCBLK to read the complete article and complete the form.

Golden Globes 2019: Regina King Vows Her Future Projects Will Have Full Gender Parity

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At this year’s Golden Globes, Regina King used her acceptance speech to make a solemn career promise.

Moving forward, the actress declared that all future projects she produces will be fully gender equal, employing 50 percent women.

“I’m going to use my platform,” she said, as she accepted a supporting-actress award for her performance in If Beale Street Could Talk. “Anyone out there . . . not just in our industry, in all industries—I challenge you to challenge yourselves, and stand with us in solidarity and do the same.”

Her declarations echo Frances McDormand’s 2018 Oscars acceptance speech, in which the best actress promoted inclusion riders—contractual obligations that ensure films have some form of diversity and parity behind the scenes. Her speech, in turn, inspired numerous industry figures to embrace riders in their projects moving forward, including actor Michael B. Jordan.

King, who was a double nominee at the Globes, began her speech by thanking her team, film studio Annapurna, and director Barry Jenkins. “I love you with all my heart,” she told the director. “Thank you for your empathy. Thank you for telling stories so rich.”

The actress also thanked the James Baldwin estate, who gave Jenkins permission to adapt the author’s 1974 novel into a film. King then spoke about the importance of celebrities using their spotlight to speak about important issues—which is about the time she started getting played off by the orchestra.

Continue on to Vanity Fair to read the complete article.

50th NAACP Image Awards To Air Live on TV ONE March 30, 2019

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The 50th NAACP Image Awards will air LIVE on TV One, a division of Urban One, Inc., on March 30, 2019. For the first time ever, the telecast will take place from the Dolby Theatre in Hollywood, California.

The announcement was made by NAACP National Board of Directors Chairman Leon W. Russell, NAACP President and CEO Derrick Johnson, Chief Executive Officer, Urban One, Inc. & Chairman/CEO, TV One Alfred Liggins and TV One General Manager Michelle Rice.

The NAACP Image Awards celebrates the accomplishment of people of color in the fields of television, music, literature, and film and also honors individuals or groups who promote social justice through creative endeavors. The upcoming telecast, the 50th Anniversary of the NAACP Image Awards, will also spotlight the significant contributions of the NAACP and the impact the organization has had on our community and country.

In addition to the live telecast, TV One will also air special programming honoring this year’s nominees and spotlighting significant moments. The network will provide promotional support for both programs on TV One, Radio One and Reach Media, Interactive One, and via a multi-platform marketing campaign.

“The 50th Anniversary of the Image Awards represents a major milestone in bringing visibility to the outstanding achievements of African Americans in entertainment, literature, and arts, as well as the NAACP’s ongoing advocacy for equality of opportunity in our society without regard for race,” said the NAACP’s Derrick Johnson. “We are sincerely grateful for our continued partnership with TV One and look forward to working with them on the 50th-anniversary show, added Johnson.

“We are honored to continue our partnership with the NAACP to remain the television home for the Image Awards,” said Liggins of TV One. “The NAACP 50th Anniversary Image Awards is an important milestone for the African American community and we couldn’t be more thrilled to offer this special programming once again to our viewers. As we prepare to celebrate the network’s 15th anniversary next year, we look forward to this very special night.”

“African Americans have had a tremendous impact on society and culture, a fact that we’re excited to celebrate with the telecast of the 50th NAACP Image Awards on TV One,” said Michelle Rice, General Manager. “As we honor this year’s biggest achievements and the incredible 50 year legacy of the NAACP Image Awards, we’re proud to continue the network’s mission to represent the richness of the Black experience.”

The multi-cultural show is one of the most respected events of its kind and is well attended by many of the top names in the entertainment industry. Airing on MLK day last year, the 49th NAACP Image Awards posted strong year-over-year growth across most demos: Households (+15%), P25-54 (+21%), P18-49 (+44%), W18-49 (+20%), and Total Viewers 2+ (+10%). And, for the night, the special was a Top 5 Cable Telecast among African Americans (Households, AA W25-54, and AA P2+). Additionally, the show has reached 2.4 Million Total Unique Viewers 2+ since airing in January 2018.

Continue on to NAACP.org to read the complete article.

Lebron James: Five Humongous Charitable Donations

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Lebron James is an NBA superstar but also a generous philanthropist. The professional basketball player especially gives back to his hometown of Akron, Ohio.

James makes a lot of money in basketball but also in endorsement deals. He never forgets his humble beginnings and is always ready to give to those in need and causes that he believes in.

When Lebron was born in Akron, Ohio on December 30, 1984, his mother Gloria was just 16 years old. She raised him well despite being so young and having to work many jobs. When Lebron was 9 years old, Gloria had him move in with Frank Waller and his family for stability. Waller was the local youth basketball coach and got Lebron interested in the sport.

Lebron excelled at basketball. He was a star player at St. Vincent-St. Mary High School in Akron where his nickname was “King James”. The NBA noticed and the media promoted him as the next NBA superstar. Lebron was instantly snatched up as the first draft pick for the Cleveland Cavaliers. He won Rookie of the Year in 2004, and helped lead the team to is first finals in 2007. When Lebron became a free agent, the big question was: would he stay with the Cavs?

ESPN promoted Lebrons dilemma in 2010 with a one hour special entitled “The Decision”. Lebron was reluctant to do the special but decided to donate the profits to charity. Sadly for Cleveland fans, Lebron chose to play for the Miami Heat. Despite some backlash about his disloyalty to his hometown, the money from the special was a big reward because it raised more than $3 million for charity and the special was watched by 10 million people. Lebron gave most of the money to Boys and Girls Clubs throughout the country and the rest to other charities with similar interests in helping children.

Lebron had a successful run with the Miami Heat. He helped the Heat win NBA Championships in 2012 and He was named NBA MVP in 2009, 2010, 2012 and 2013. Lebron also won Olympic gold medals in 2008 and 2012. Happily for Cleveland, Lebron returned to play for the Cleveland Cavaliers and led them to the NBA Championship win for the 2016 season.

Lebron has never let his fame go to his head. He set up the Lebron James Family Foundation. The foundation raises and donates money for several charities. These include Boys and Girls Clubs of America, After-School All-Stars, the Children’s Defense Fund, Gabriel’s Angle Foundation and ONEXONE.

Here are 5 of the biggest charities that Lebron James donates to:

After-School All-Stars
Lebron’s Foundation began the After-School All-Stars for the children of his hometown, Akron. The Foundation has raised money and donated to the charity for many years. It began as a bike-a-thon, “Wheels For Education” to raise money for children in Akron to have help with education and a place to go after school. It developed into a program to help “at risk” children of Akron in a variety of ways. The program provides mentoring and help with education as well as extracurricular activities. The goal is to keep kids in school and encourage them to graduate. It begins in the third grade when students need to reach state standards to move up to the fourth grade.

The program provides reading and math help for children who need the mentoring and discourages them from dropping out of school before graduating. Overall, Lebron’s Foundation has raised over $40 million for the program. Recently, Lebon teamed with the University of Akron to provide scholarships. The children must participate in the program and parents are encouraged to participate. Lebron is very involved with the program. When he cannot be there, he connects with the children via social media. The program currently sponsors over 800 children. The first graduating class will be in 2021. The scholarship covers $9500 annual college tuition for each student. Lebron hopes to extend the program throughout the state of Ohio.

Muhammad Ali: A Force For Change
Most recently, Lebron James donated money for the exhibit at the Smithsonian National Museum of African American History and Culture’s exhibit honoring boxing legend Muhammad Ali. The exhibit entitled “Muhammad Ali: A Force For Change” spans two parts of the museum honoring Ali, one celebrating his stellar boxing career and one celebrating his social activism. Lebron donated $2.5 million to the exhibit, joining Michael Jordan and Magic Johnson in contributing. Lebrom has said that Ali was an important inspiration to him as an athlete but also as a champion of justice. Lebron admired the boxing legend, who passed away in June 2016 after a long battle with Parkinson’s Disease, for Ali’s passion, goals and morals during and after the civil rights movement.

Boys and Girls Club of America
Lebron James designated $2.5 million of the proceeds from ESPN’s “The Decision” special to Boys and Girls Clubs of America. While in Miami, Lebron was very involved in Miami’s club. The club helps give all children equal opportunities and provides after school mentoring and activities. Lebron and his wife designed and donated furniture to the Miami club through Home Court Furniture. They replaced the roof and fixed up the children’s work space. They donated 1000 new computers to 59 Boys and Girls Clubs throughout America.

Children’s Defense Fund
The Children’s Defense Fund started in 1973. Its purpose is to be a voice for children’s rights and make sure that all children are treated equally and fairly. Lebron James’ Foundation is a major contributor to the non profit organization. As with the After-School All-Stars, the program focuses on “at risk” children who come from poor backgrounds and helps these children complete their education.

ONEXONE
ONEXONE also focuses on the support of children. Their mission includes taking care of children by helping them with the 5 pillars: hunger, health, education, water and play. Like After-School All-Stars, the organization uses donations to provide help to those children who need it and encourages them by giving them hope and a sense of pride. The program provides healthy breakfasts in schools, water, medical help, educational help and after school activities. As with most of Lebron’s charitable causes, he especially gives back to the children. His Foundation is a major donator to ONEXONE. Clearly, Lebron James never forgot the humble beginnings he came from. Without the help and encouragement of mentors like his mother and the Waller family, Lebron may not have had the opportunity to achieve the success he has. His talent as a basketball player and his humanitarian spirit have inspired Lebron to give back. He never let his ego get in the way of giving back to those who inspired him and to the children.

Continue on to Money Inc. to read the complete article.

In the Dugout with Jackie Robinson: An Intimate Portrait of a Baseball Legend

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Jackie Robinson

In 1947 Jackie Robinson (1919-1972) made history when he joined the Brooklyn Dodgers and became the first African-American to play Major League Baseball in the modern era.

Opening on January 31—Robinson’s 100th birthday—In the Dugout with Jackie Robinson: An Intimate Portrait of a Baseball Legend will feature 32 photographs (most of them never published), originally shot for Look magazine; rare home movies of the Robinson family; and memorabilia related to Robinson’s career.

The exhibition is presented in collaboration with the Jackie Robinson Foundation and launches the Foundation’s yearlong, national Jackie Robinson Centennial Celebration, which culminates in the opening of the Jackie Robinson Museum in New York City in December 2019. “We are honored to partner with the Jackie Robinson Museum in celebrating the legacy of a true American icon,” said Whitney Donhauser, Ronay Menschel Director and President of the Museum of the City of New York. “Robinson’s trailblazing years as a Brooklyn Dodger captivated the country and these photographs offer an intimate glimpse of a defining period in American sports history.”

Della Britton, president and CEO of the Jackie Robinson Foundation remarked, “We are thrilled to begin our year-long celebration with this showcase of photographic treasures that depict Jackie Robinson’s life and career in New York. And the beautiful Museum of the City of New York is a fitting venue, as it was in this city that our namesake paved a way for a more inclusive America.” Robinson spent only one season with the Negro Leagues’ Kansas City Monarchs before he was recruited by Brooklyn Dodgers general manager Branch Rickey. Looking to turn the tide of the much-maligned team, Rickey chose Robinson not only for his talent, but for his demeanor and courage. From the moment Robinson stepped onto Ebbets Field on April 15, 1947, he endured jeers and even physical threats from fellow players, ticket buyers, and a segregated American public.

Despite adversity, Robinson ended his first season as the winner of Major League Baseball’s inaugural “Rookie of the Year” award. He was named the National League’s Most Valuable Player two years later and went on to win six pennants in his 10 seasons with the Dodgers. Following his retirement in 1957, Robinson continued to break barriers as a vice president of Chock full o’Nuts, becoming the first African American officer of a major national corporation. He remained dedicated to civil rights and the advancement of African Americans in industry and commerce, serving on the board of the NAACP and co-founding the Freedom National Bank in Harlem, which became one of the largest black-owned banks in the country.The exhibition features photographs taken on assignment by Look staff photographers Kenneth Eide and Frank Bauman. Robinson was a frequent face in Look, where he contributed three autobiographical essays (including 1955’s “Now I Know Why They Boo Me!”) and announced his retirement.

Continue on to the AssociatedPress to read the complete article

Former ABC President Channing Dungey joins Netflix

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In a move anticipated within the industry, Dungey is headed to the new home of two other former powerhouse ABCers: Shonda Rhimes and Kenya Barris.

Channing Dungey, the former head of ABC Entertainment who stepped down in November, is joining Netflix, where she will oversee original TV series alongside Cindy Holland, the company’s longtime head of originals.

The move was anticipated within the industry and reunites Dungey with two of her former showrunners, Shonda Rhimes (Grey’s AnatomyScandal) and Kenya Barris (Black-ish), both of whom decamped from ABC to Netflix earlier this year. At Netflix, Channing will also oversee other high-profile producers, such as the Obamas, who have a producing deal at the company; Jenji Kohan (Orange is the New BlackGlow) and Marti Noxon; as well half of the originals executive team. The other half will report to Holland.

Interestingly, sources told The Hollywood Reporter that Dungey, a TV veteran who had been at ABC since 2004, will also have a direct line of communication with Netflix’s content chief Ted Sarandos. Like other executives whom Netflix has poached from traditional entertainment companies, such as Scott Stuber, who heads Netflix’s original film division, Dungey brings experience working with talent and nurturing projects as the company invests more heavily in its own content–and begins to operate more like a traditional studio. In contrast, Holland was promoted to oversee originals in 2012, when Netflix first began making its own shows. She started at the company in DVD acquisitions and then took over domestic TV licensing.

Dungey’s exit from ABC came as its parent company, the Walt Disney Company, was preparing to merge with 21st Century Fox. The new arrangement would have united Dungey with her formal rival at Fox, Dana Walden, who was named in October as incoming Disney TV Studios chairman. Her departure also marked the end of a dramatic year at ABC. After green-lighting a remake of Roseanne that became one of the network’s biggest hits, Dungey swiftly fired the show’s star, Roseanne Barr, after she made a racist slur on Twitter. The show continued production as a spin-off (The Conners) without Barr, but has faired less spectacularly in the ratings.

Continue onto Fast Company to read the complete article.

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