Linda Brown, Center Of Brown v. Board Of Education, Dies At 76

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Linda Brown was the young girl at the center of the 1954 Brown v. Board of Education Supreme Court decision that would end legal school segregation.

Linda Brown, the young girl at the center of the 1954 Brown v. Board of Education Supreme Court case, died on Monday at the age of 76.

Brown’s sister, Cheryl Brown Henderson, confirmed the death to the Topeka-Capital Journal. Peaceful Rest Funeral Chapel of Topeka independently confirmed Brown’s death with HuffPost.

“Sixty-four years ago a young girl from Topeka brought a case that ended segregation in public schools in America,” Kansas Gov. Jeff Colyer tweeted Monday. “Linda Brown’s life reminds us that sometimes the most unlikely people can have an incredible impact and that by serving our community we can truly change the world.”

It was Brown’s father, Rev. Oliver Brown, who sued the Topeka school board to allow his daughter the right to attend an all-white school in the Kansas capital city. Four other school segregation cases were combined with Brown’s to be heard by the Supreme Court, but the justices’ unanimous ruling was named for Brown.

Brown, who was also known as Linda Carol Thompson after her marriage in the mid 1990s, was forced to attend an all-black school far away from her home even though an all-white school was only blocks away.

Brown told MSNBC in 2014 that she remembered the embarrassment of being separated from her neighborhood friends and the long walk to the bus stop.

“I remember a couple of times turning around and going back home because I — you know, it was a small town,” she said. “I got really, really cold and would get home and be crying. And mother would, you know, she would try to warm me up and tell me it would be all right and everything.”

The Supreme Court ruled unanimously in favor of Brown. In its decision, the court overturned the 1896 “separate but equal” ruling in Plessy v. Ferguson, marking the case as one of the biggest legal victories of the civil rights era. It was due to Brown v. Board of Education that the federal government could force states to integrate schools, allowing children of color the opportunity for an equal education to white children.

Brown credited her father and the other families who took their cases to court for removing the “stigma of not having a choice” during a 1985 interview for the PBS documentary series “Eyes on the Prize.”

“I feel that after 30 years, looking back on Brown v. The Board of Education, it has made an impact in all facets of life for minorities throughout the land,” Brown said during the interview. “I really think of it in terms of what it has done for our young people, in taking away that feeling of second class citizenship. I think it has made the dreams, hopes and aspirations of our young people greater, today.”

Continue onto the HuffingtonPost to read the complete article.

Martin Luther King Day: 4 Ways to Honor His Legacy

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‘Crusader: Martin Luther King Jr.’

This newly opened photography exhibition features images of Dr. King’s Gandhi-inspired pilgrimage to India in 1959 and the 1964 Nobel Peace Prize ceremony in which he was honored for his nonviolent crusade against racism. The exhibition continues through April 6 at the Schomburg Center for Research in Black Culture in Manhattan; nypl.org/locations/schomburg.

‘Turning 15 on the Road to Freedom’

In 1965 Lynda Blackmon Lowery marched as a teenager alongside Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. from Selma to Montgomery, Ala. She was jailed nine times before she turned 15 and was beaten on Bloody Sunday, when civil rights protesters were attacked by police officers and vigilantes. This play, adapted from Ms. Lowery’s memoir, dramatizes her experiences. She’ll be on hand for discussions after both matinee performances. Jan. 19 at 2 and 7 p.m., and Jan. 20 at 2 and 6 p.m. at the Riverside Church, 490 Riverside Drive; Manhattan; trcnyc.org.

‘Unsung Champions of Civil Rights From MLK to Today’

Jami Floyd and Brian Lehrer of Public Radio’s WNYC host a free program of interviews and panels focusing on the activists who have not yet received the recognition they deserve. The event will also include a photography exhibition and performances by Rutha Harris of the Freedom Singers and members of Urban Word NYC. Chester Higgins Jr., a former New York Times staff photographer, will be among the guests. RSVP in advance. Jan. 20 at 3 p.m. at the Apollo Theater; apollotheater.org/uptownhall.

Continue on to the New York Times to read the complete article.

Lauren Underwood is the youngest black woman to serve in Congress

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The 32-year-old registered nurse is one of three Democrats from Illinois sworn in to the House on Thursday.

Lauren Underwood, a Democrat from Naperville, Illinois, became the youngest black woman in history to be sworn in to the House of Representatives on Thursday afternoon.

Underwood, 32, a registered nurse with two master’s degrees from Johns Hopkins University, began her political career as a policy professional in the Obama administration in 2014. Two years later, she became a senior adviser at the Department of Health and Human Services where she worked to implement the Affordable Care Act (ACA).

Underwood announced her candidacy in Illinois’s 14th Congressional District in August 2017 on a platform of expanding job opportunities, investing in infrastructure and improving the ACA. She defeated the incumbent Republican, Randy Hultgren, in the Nov. 6 election, garnering 52.5 percent of the vote.

“Are you excited to make history?,” Underwood was asked Thursday afternoon as she posed for pictures on her way to the Capitol.

“A moment in history,” Underwood responded, according to The Chicago Tribune.

Underwood is one of the three Illinois Democrats who were sworn into the House on Thursday; the other two are Sean Casten and Jesus “Chuy” Garcia. Her appointment means that Democrats now have a 13-5 advantage over Republicans in Illinois’ House delegation.

For her, losing was never an option.

“I learned to be a black woman in this community,” Underwood toldThe New York Times in July. “This is my home, and the idea that I might not be a good fit is an idea I never gave a lot of consideration to.”

Continue onto NBC News to read the complete article.

Black PR Wire Power Profiler on Dr. Maulana Karenga

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maulena-karenga

Dr. Maulana Karenga is professor of Africana Studies at California State University, Long Beach. He is also chair of the President’s Task Force on Multicultural Education and Campus Diversity at California State University, Long Beach.

Dr. Karenga holds two Ph.D.’s; his first in political science with focus on the theory and practice of nationalism (United States International University) and his second in social ethics with a focus on the classical African ethics of ancient Egypt (University of Southern California). He also holds an honorary doctorate of philosophy from the University of Durban-Westville, South Africa.

Moreover, Dr. Karenga is the director of the Kawaida Institute of Pan-African Studies, Los Angeles, and national chairman of The Organization Us, a cultural and social change organization, so named to stress the communitarian focus of the organization. Dr. Karenga has had a profound and far-reaching effect on Black intellectual and political culture. Through his organization Us and his philosophy, Kawaida, he has played a vanguard role in shaping the Black Arts Movement, Black Studies, the Black Power Movement, Black Student Union Movement, Afrocentri¬city, rites of passage programs, the study of ancient Egyptian culture as an essential part of Black Studies, the independent Black school movement, African life-cycle ceremonies, the Simba Wachanga youth movement, and Black theological and ethical discourse.

Dr. Karenga is also widely known as the creator of Kwanzaa, an African American and Pan-African holiday celebrated throughout the world African community on every continent in the world. He is the author of the authoritative book on the subject: Kwanzaa: A Celebration of Family, Community and Culture and lectures regularly and extensively on the vision and values of Kwanzaa, especially the Nguzo Saba (The Seven Principles), in various national and international venues.

Continue on to BlackPrWire to read the complete article.

The Howard University Ooh La La! Dance Line Wins the #RadiantDanceOff Contest

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Howard University Dancers

It’s official, the Howard University Ooh La La! dance line reigns supreme, winning the second annual HBCU Dance #RadiantDanceOff Contest presented by The Radiant Collection from Procter & Gamble’s (P&G) leading feminine protection brands Tampax® and Always®, in partnership with HBCU Dance Corporation, Inc.

This year, the Ooh La La! dance line competed against 19 HBCU schools nationwide in the #RadiantDanceOff to win $20,000 and custom uniforms created by Briana Bigham, a seasoned designer who has worked with some of the most popular labels in fashion.

“HBCU dancers are some of the hardest working women on the yard, and they give their all in every performance. Their skill and on-the-field radiance shined in every #RadiantDanceOff submission we received so choosing just one winning team was a huge challenge,” says Keelia Brown, founder of HBCU Dance Corporation, Inc. “The #RadiantDanceOff competition shines a light on the confidence and talent of the amazing women on the teams, and the prize from The Tampax and Always Radiant Collection will help them keep dancing.”

This was the second annual #RadiantDanceOff contest, a national online dance competition designed exclusively for Historically Black Colleges and Universities (HBCUs). Created in 2017, the contest was designed to change the fact that African-American women avoid activities like dancing, and even compromise their style during their periods1. The contest highlights the bold moves and fierce styles worn by HBCU dance lines to show women everywhere that they can wear and do whatever they want with confidence, any day of the month, and showcases the incredible skill of majorettes across the country.

This homecoming season, eligible HBCU dance teams competed to earn one of the top five spots in the #RadiantDanceOff competition. As per last year’s program, eligible teams entered by submitting a two-minute video that was voted on by fans, alumni and students, along with a short essay highlighting why their team runs the yard. A panel then judged the five dance teams with the highest number of votes on:

  • Difficulty of dance steps, cohesiveness and technical proficiency
  • Originality of dance performance
  • Creative execution of wardrobe selection
  • Ability to convey character and expression in the dance
  • Essay submission

“The Tampax and Always Radiant Collection is all about giving women the freedom to be the fiercest version of themselves any day of the month,” says Melissa Suk, Brand Director, North America Feminine Care at Procter & Gamble. “The women of Howard University radiate confidence every day, and we’re happy we can help them shine even brighter on the field.”

Continue on to Business Wire to read the complete article.

Dr. Gladys West, Who Helped Develop The GPS, Inducted Into Air Force Space and Missile Pioneers Hall of Fame

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This “hidden figure” is finally getting her due praise.

A “hidden figure” in the development of GPS technology has officially been honored for her work. Mathematician Dr. Gladys West was recognized for doing the computing responsible for creating the Geographical Positioning System, more commonly referred to as the GPS.

On December 6, the 87-year-old woman was inducted into the Air Force Space and Missile Pioneers Hall of Fame by the United States Air Force during a ceremony at the Pentagon.

The Alpha Kappa Alpha Sorority member, born in Dinwiddie County, Virginia, earned a full scholarship to Virginia State University after graduating high school at the top of her class. Gwen James, her sorority sister, told The Associated Press she discovered her longtime friend’s achievements when she was compiling a bio for senior members of the group.

“GPS has changed the lives of everyone forever,” James said. “There is not a segment of this global society — military, auto industry, cell phone industry, social media, parents, NASA, etc. — that does not utilize the Global Positioning System.”

Dr. West spent 42 years working on the naval base at Dahlgren, Virginia. During this time, she was one of the few women hired by the military to do advanced technological work. During the early 1960s, she was commissioned by the U.S. Naval Weapons Laboratory to support research around Pluto’s motion. From the mid-1970s to the 1980s, her computing work on a geodetic Earth model led to what became the first GPS orbit.

“This involved planning and executing several highly complex computer algorithms which have to analyze an enormous amount of data,” Ralph Neiman, her supervisor who recommended her for commendation in 1979, said. “You have used your knowledge of computer applications to accomplish this in an efficient and timely manner.”

Continue onto Blavity to read the complete article.

83-Year-Old Veteran to Receive Ph.D. from LSU

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Johnnie Jones’ age isn’t stopping him from learning. In fact, the 83-year-old veteran will receive his Ph.D. from LSU on Friday, Dec. 14.

“Every person regardless of his station in life, or his or her limitations, should seek to be the best he or she can really be. And you spend your time living not thinking about dying. Death will take care of itself,” Jones said.

Jones used that focus to pursue a bachelor’s degree, master’s degree and a Ph.D., and he has hopes of going to law school next.

“I want to study law. I have no intention of being an attorney; I simply want to go to law school for the knowledge, and I’m sure there will be students in the class who think I’m nuts, but so what?”

Jones was born in Mississippi and at the age of 18, joined the Marine Corps. His LSU education started while he was deployed to Vietnam as a squad leader.

“I wanted to stay connected, so to speak. I didn’t want to run the risk of losing interest because I had begun studies at San Diego Community College when I went to Vietnam,” Jones said. “LSU’s correspondence course was offered to any student, regardless where they were or what their status was, so I just happened to take advantage of the program.”

After he left Vietnam, Jones received a degree in sociology from the University of Hawaii.

“From Hawaii I moved back to California, where I submitted a number of applications for graduate school, and LSU came through first, plus I had already been taking a course from LSU, so I settled on LSU.”

Jones received a Master’s of Social Work from LSU in 1975 and was about nine hours short of his Ph.D. when he received a job offer from the Department of Corrections. He would retire 25 years later as the warden for the women’s prison.

“Of course, having a family and young children, I took the job and that’s how that turned out,” Jones said. “And as a consequence, I ran out the required seven year time period that they give you to complete the Ph.D. So I had to start all over again from scratch.”

Jones started over, but another set-back prevented him from receiving a Ph.D.

“I had a serious health problem and again, I had completed all of the requirements for the Ph.D. in human ecology, but I had to drop out because of health reasons.”

Just when he was ready to start working toward the degree for the third time, Jones said a professor helped him get an extension, allowing him to complete his dissertation and not have to start over again.

“My dissertation was about racism and religion and specifically the perceptions of racism and the stress that black families experience as a result, and how religion serves as a coping strategy.”

Jones said the state provides free tuition for students over 65 years old and said LSU’s faculty have both supported and challenged him. He added, the other students have enjoyed having him in class.

“It was really comical, most of my classmates are young enough to be my grandchildren and they found it amazing at my age that I would be sitting in a classroom. They thought I was nuts. They didn’t quite understand what motivated me. They’re all preparing for occupations, but my occupation was over. I had retired. I was just there for self-edification,” said Jones. “I told them the reason why I was doing that, is because to me age is something that we have been socialized to believe that it is one of the most important things in our life. At 15, you’re supposed to be doing this, at 25 you’re supposed to be doing this, at 65…that’s arbitrary. I think you should not cease pursuing whatever it is you’re interested in because of age. Your only limitation that you should have is mental or physical, other than that you should keep on pushing.”

Continue onto Louisiana State University Newsroom to read the complete article.

For the First Time in History, Two African Americans will Hold Top Leadership Positions in Congress at the Same Time

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Recently, CBC Member Hakeem Jeffries (D-NY-08) was elected chair of the Democratic Caucus, and Assistant Democratic Leader James E. Clyburn (D-SC-06) was elected Majority Whip, making it the first time in history that two African Americans will hold top leadership positions in Congress at the same time.

In response to these elections, the Chairman of the Congressional Black Caucus, Congressman Cedric L. Richmond (D-LA-02), released the following statement:

“When the Congressional Black Caucus was founded in 1971, I know our 13 founding members dreamed of the day when we would have more than one member in our ranks competing for top leadership positions in Congress. Today was that day, and I know they are proud.

“When Congresswoman Barbara Lee and Congressman Hakeem Jeffries articulated to our colleagues why they were the best candidate for Democratic Caucus chair, it was one of the best displays of black brilliance that I have seen in a long time. The unfortunate part of their race against each other was that one of them had to lose.

“I congratulate Congressman Jeffries on being elected Democratic Caucus chair; he has more than demonstrated during his time in Congress that he is ready to lead in this position.

“I also congratulate Assistant Democratic Leader James E. Clyburn on being elected Majority Whip. There are few Democrats who have done more than Assistant Democratic Leader Clyburn to mentor young members of Congress and make sure that Democrats win elections.

“When former congressman George Henry White, the last African-American congressman to leave Congress before the Jim Crow Era, left office in 1901, he said in his famous farewell address, ‘This is perhaps the Negroes’ temporary farewell to the American Congress, but let me say, Phoenix-like he will rise up some day and come again.’

“Next Congress, the CBC will have 55 members, including two who will be in top leadership positions and five who will chair full House committees – former congressman George Henry White was right, and the Phoenix has risen.”

Continue on to BlackPrWire.com to read the complete article.

Wilfred DeFour, 100-year-old Tuskegee Airman, dies

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Wilfred DeFour

Wilfred DeFour, who served with the Tuskegee Airmen during World War II, was found dead Saturday in New York. He was 100.

New York police said officers responded to a 911 call to a residence in Harlem and found a man identified as DeFour unconscious and unresponsive. There were no obvious signs of trauma, police said, and the medical examiner will determine the cause of death.

DeFour attended a ceremony last month for the renaming of a Harlem post office in honor of the Tuskegee Airmen, CNN affiliate WABC reported. The Tuskegee Airmen were the first African-American military aviators in the US service corps. They trained at the Tuskegee Army Airfield in Macon County, Alabama.

“I regret so many of my comrades are no longer here with us,” DeFour said, according to WABC. “It will mean there’s recognition for Tuskegee Airmen and that’s very important.”

The group was generally said to include pilots, navigators, bombardiers, maintenance and support staff who went through a US Army Air Corps training program to bring African-Americans into the war effort, according to Tuskegee Airmen Inc., a group devoted to the history of the airmen.

DeFour was an aircraft technician during World War II, WABC said. After the war, he worked for the US Postal Service for 33 years.

Continue on to CNN to read the complete article.

Dr. Olivia Hooker, One Of The Last Survivors Of The Tulsa Race Riots, Dies At 103

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Hooker was the first Black woman to enlist in the U.S Coast Guard.

Dr. Olivia Hooker, one of the last survivors of the 1921 Tulsa Race Riots, has passed away at 103 years old. Hooker was also the first Black woman to join the U.S. Coast Guard in 1945.

The former professor and psychologist received her undergraduate degree from Ohio State University where she became a member of Delta Sigma Theta sorority and advocated for women serving in the Navy. Hooker earned a master’s degree from the Teacher’s College of Columbia University and became an elementary school teacher.

Years later, the educator tried to enlist for the Navy. She was rejected because she was Black. Three years after the Coast Guard created a reserve unit for women called the Spars, short for the Latin motto Semper Paratus meaning “always ready,” Hooker was successfully admitted.

She became the first African-American to enroll and earned the distinction as the first Black female Coast Guard. The program disbanded in 1946, but she left ranking as a second class petty officer and won a Good Conduct Award.

The organization shared a tweet to express their condolences to her family.

In 1961, Hooker received her Ph.D. in psychology from the University of Rochester which propelled her work as a psychology professor at Fordham University.

Several years ago she was invited to the White House where she was honored for her achievements by former President Barack Obama.

“She has been a professor and mentor to her students, a passionate advocate for Americans with disabilities, a psychologist counseling young children, a caregiver at the height of the AIDS epidemic, a tireless voice for justice and equality,” he stated.

Continue onto Blavity to read the complete article.

Explore Your Options: The One-Year or the Two-Year MBA?

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Choosing between a one-year MBA and a two-year MBA should be a simple matter of personal choice. Yet, the reality isn’t so straightforward.

If you wanted to study at a top school in the United States, for example, you would find your selection of one-year MBA programs somewhat limited, although the idea is catching on. The same would apply in Europe if you were looking for a two-year program. So, you may have to compromise on one of these aspects.

The two-year format of the MBA is the long-time precursor of its one-year counterpart, brought into being by the Tuck School of Business back in 1900. The one-year MBA came to prominence in Europe 60 years later. This condensing of the degree might have come as an affront to some leading management experts at the time, but the format gained traction. According to The Graduate Management Admission Council® (GMAC®), a global, non-profit association of leading graduate business schools, in its 2016 Applications Trends Survey, it is becoming the more popular of the two program lengths.

This North American-European divide is still in play, and may well impact your options in terms of program length—be it a decision on the length of program you pursue or one on where you study. Though there are certainly exceptions on both side.

The Two-Year MBA: Time on Your Side

“We haven’t felt comfortable offering a one-year MBA here,” Madhav Rajan, former senior associate dean at the Stanford Graduate School of Business (now at Chicago Booth), told the New York Times back in 2014. “I think there would be huge demand if we ever went that route, but given the content we want to disseminate, that’s not something we’ve pursued.”

This is the big argument for the two- year MBA encapsulated. The two-year program (and remember that ‘two years’ can mean anything from between 16 and 24 months), allows students more time to read, digest, study, and apply what they’ve learned. The schedule may be slightly less intense than a one-year program, leaving more days to participate in extracurricular activities and networking.

A longer MBA program may also mean more opportunity to do electives. MBA programs are composed of the core subjects that need to be covered by all students to obtain a full grasp of management, but there are also chances to specialize. With hundreds of electives available at some schools, students are offered a colorful bouquet of options. If that makes you feel like a kid in a candy store, well … maybe you should look into two-year MBA options.

Career Switchers

Most, if not all, two-year MBA programs feature a summer internship as the filling in the sandwich. For students who have not had a traditional business background or who want to change sector, this can be an excellent opportunity to trial a new industry or job function, without having to commit long-term. Younger students with less work experience may also benefit from the experience the internship can provide.

The One-Year MBA

The one-year MBA benefits two sets of students in particular: those with solid functional experience, and those who know precisely what job they’re aiming for when they set foot on campus.

The one-year MBA can cost as much as 50 percent less than a two-year MBA, and you’ll only have to save up enough money to cover your living costs for one year. Taking one year rather than two out of work also means a great deal less salary lost, too. Nick Barniville is director of MBA and master’s programs at the European School of Management and Technology in Berlin. He explains that, in addition to time and money saving, “all evidence from major rankings suggests that graduates from one-year programs earn roughly the same as those graduating from similarly ranked two-year programs.

“Participants on one-year programs get less vacation and have a more intense work schedule; this can be included as an efficiency benefit because it makes little sense to be paying a lot of money to have free time,” he adds.

Ultimately, the decision is a personal one. How much experience do you have? How sure are you of your future plans? Where do you want to study? Do you want to change careers or just upskill? Consider your options carefully, and make sure that you speak to schools in the process, so you can fully understand which is the right format for you.

Author-Karen Turtle
Source: This article first appeared in TopMBA.com

Aaron I. Bruce Named Vice President and Chief Diversity Officer of ArtCenter College of Design

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Aaron Bruce posing for camera

November 27, 2018, Pasadena, Calif. – ArtCenter College of Design President Lorne M. Buchman announced today that, after a comprehensive international search, the College has named Aaron I. Bruce to the new inaugural role of vice president and chief diversity officer.

With more than 20 years of experience leading initiatives focused on campus diversity, inclusion and international engagement, Bruce will officially begin his tenure at ArtCenter on December 3, 2018, and will lead the establishment of a new Center for Diversity, Equity and Inclusion in Art and Design.

Since 2008, Bruce has served as the chief diversity officer at San Diego State University where he led the implementation of that University’s diversity strategic plan.

“His achievements in curricular redesign, recruitment, retention, marketing and global community programming are all deeply impressive,” said Buchman. “His passion for art and design, together with his extensive record of research and program development in areas of diversity, equity and inclusion, make him an ideal candidate for the job.”

“I’m excited to join such a stellar team of creative giants,” said Bruce. “ArtCenter represents the intersection of some of the most innovative art and design spaces in the world. The journey towards adopting inclusive art and design strategies provides us with the power to collectively change human expression in ways we cannot fully imagine.”

Bruce holds a PhD from the University of Rhode Island and a Masters of International Business Administration from United States International University (Alliant).

As envisioned, the Center for Diversity, Equity and Inclusion in Art and Design will involve students, alumni, faculty and staff, as well as external communities, in robust research, exhibitions, symposia, lectures and curricular expansion on issues of diversity, equity, and inclusion (DEI) in art and design. The proposed Center for DEI will create and support collaborative and transformative activities in the service of the College’s values of DEI that are designed to break new ground through practice, scholarship and pedagogy. In addition, the Center will serve as a partner to ensure that DEI programs, practices and policies for faculty, staff and students are aligned with the College’s strategic plan, values and mission.

“Harnessing creative energy to develop positive change globally is just one of the many characteristics that attract me to ArtCenter. Research shows that embracing the unique identities and lived experiences of artists and designers helps industries achieve higher levels of performance,” said Bruce. “I envision the Center for Diversity, Equity and Inclusion in Art and Design to be a nucleus, where the combined energy of our community helps us thrive. The goal is to build a flexible learning space where diverse research, pedagogy and creative expression is explored. A space where all perspectives are valued, and new skills will be adopted. The end game is to prepare students to be successful creative leaders in a highly diverse and globalized workforce.”

About ArtCenter College of Design

Founded in 1930 and located in Pasadena, California, ArtCenter College of Design is a global leader in art and design education. ArtCenter offers 11 undergraduate and seven graduate degrees in a wide variety of industrial design disciplines as well as visual and applied arts. In addition to its top-ranked academic programs, the College also serves members of the Greater Los Angeles region through a highly regarded series of year-round continuing education programs for all ages and levels of experience. Renowned for both its ties to industry and its social impact initiatives, ArtCenter is the first design school to receive the United Nations’ Non-Governmental Organization (NGO) status. Throughout the College’s long and storied history, ArtCenter alumni have had a profound impact on popular culture, the way we live and important issues in our society.

Guillaume to Lead The Crimson’s 146th Guard

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Kristine E. Guillaume ’20 will lead the newly elected 146th Guard of The Harvard Crimson, the organization’s President announced on Monday. Guillaume is the first black woman to serve as President of The Crimson in the paper’s 145-year history.

Guillaume, a joint African American Studies and History and Literature concentrator, is currently one of The Crimson’s Central Administration reporters. In that capacity, she interviewed two successive University Presidents — Drew G. Faust and Lawrence S. Bacow — and worked as part of the reporting team that covered Harvard’s 2018 presidential search.

She is also one of three Chairs of The Crimson’s Diversity and Inclusivity committee, responsible for formulating and overseeing initiatives meant to make the paper more diverse and welcoming to students from all backgrounds. Guillaume, who lives in Lowell House, will begin as President on Jan. 1, 2019.

“I have the utmost confidence in the 146th Guard’s ability to carry on our proud mission of covering and informing Harvard and its affiliates,” current Crimson President Derek G. Xiao ’19 said. “I could not be more excited to see the direction the next President, Managing Editor, and Business Manager will take The Crimson in 2019.”

News writer and designer Angela N. Fu ’20 will serve as Managing Editor, overseeing the production of The Crimson’s daily newspaper, magazine, arts, and sports sections, and blog. Fu, a Government concentrator and Dunster House resident who hails from Birmingham, Ala., currently serves as a Faculty of Arts and Sciences Administration reporter. In that role, she interviewed two successive FAS Deans — Michael D. Smith and Claudine Gay — and helped report on the presidential search along with Guillaume. She also led The Crimson’s Design Board comp for two semesters.

Fu was one of two reporters who broke a story revealing that star Economics professor Roland G. Fryer, Jr. was being investigated separately by Harvard and the state of Massachusetts over allegations of sexual harassment. She faced down a threatened lawsuit to report the piece, which later earned “Honorable Mention” for Associated Collegiate Press 2018 Story of the Year.

Next year’s Business Manager will be Charlie B. Zhu ’20, an Applied Math and Economics concentrator and resident of Winthrop House from Warren, N.J. He will take the helm of The Crimson’s finances and operations after serving this year as a Director of Staff Development for the Business Board. Prior to that, he worked as an Advertising Associate.

Continue onto The Harvard Crimson to read the full article.

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