Linda Brown, Center Of Brown v. Board Of Education, Dies At 76

LinkedIn

Linda Brown was the young girl at the center of the 1954 Brown v. Board of Education Supreme Court decision that would end legal school segregation.

Linda Brown, the young girl at the center of the 1954 Brown v. Board of Education Supreme Court case, died on Monday at the age of 76.

Brown’s sister, Cheryl Brown Henderson, confirmed the death to the Topeka-Capital Journal. Peaceful Rest Funeral Chapel of Topeka independently confirmed Brown’s death with HuffPost.

“Sixty-four years ago a young girl from Topeka brought a case that ended segregation in public schools in America,” Kansas Gov. Jeff Colyer tweeted Monday. “Linda Brown’s life reminds us that sometimes the most unlikely people can have an incredible impact and that by serving our community we can truly change the world.”

It was Brown’s father, Rev. Oliver Brown, who sued the Topeka school board to allow his daughter the right to attend an all-white school in the Kansas capital city. Four other school segregation cases were combined with Brown’s to be heard by the Supreme Court, but the justices’ unanimous ruling was named for Brown.

Brown, who was also known as Linda Carol Thompson after her marriage in the mid 1990s, was forced to attend an all-black school far away from her home even though an all-white school was only blocks away.

Brown told MSNBC in 2014 that she remembered the embarrassment of being separated from her neighborhood friends and the long walk to the bus stop.

“I remember a couple of times turning around and going back home because I — you know, it was a small town,” she said. “I got really, really cold and would get home and be crying. And mother would, you know, she would try to warm me up and tell me it would be all right and everything.”

The Supreme Court ruled unanimously in favor of Brown. In its decision, the court overturned the 1896 “separate but equal” ruling in Plessy v. Ferguson, marking the case as one of the biggest legal victories of the civil rights era. It was due to Brown v. Board of Education that the federal government could force states to integrate schools, allowing children of color the opportunity for an equal education to white children.

Brown credited her father and the other families who took their cases to court for removing the “stigma of not having a choice” during a 1985 interview for the PBS documentary series “Eyes on the Prize.”

“I feel that after 30 years, looking back on Brown v. The Board of Education, it has made an impact in all facets of life for minorities throughout the land,” Brown said during the interview. “I really think of it in terms of what it has done for our young people, in taking away that feeling of second class citizenship. I think it has made the dreams, hopes and aspirations of our young people greater, today.”

Continue onto the HuffingtonPost to read the complete article.

5 Tips for Winning Scholarship Applications

LinkedIn
TFS Scholarships

Scholarships are a great way to pay for college, and unlike loans they don’t need to be repaid. But winning scholarships takes time, dedication, intensive research, and hard work—especially for essays.  It’s deadline time for college applications, so it’s important to start the search for free money now!

The Internet has made the search easy and free, and scholarship databases like Tuition Funding Sources (TFS) offers access to 7 million scholarships and $41 billion in financial aid. Start by filling in the registration; then with a click, the site searches to find any scholarships for which you might qualify. The more information you provide about yourself, the more matches TFS can make.

Undergraduate and graduate students can search for scholarships that fit their interests. The majority of scholarship opportunities featured on TFS Scholarships come directly from colleges and universities, rather than solely from competitive national pools – thereby increasing the chances of finding scholarships that are the best match for students. Each month TFS adds more than 5,000 new scholarships to its database, maximizing the number of opportunities students have to earn funding for their education.

Richard Sorensen, President of TFS, suggests these tips when applying for scholarships:

  1. Apply for smaller scholarships

Many students look for scholarships that offer big awards but those are also the most competitive. Scholarships with smaller awards are easier to obtain because fewer students are competing for them. These scholarships can help with college costs such as books and living expenses.

  1. Customize your essay

Scholarship judges can tell if you’ve adapted a previously written essay to meet their criteria. Customize your application and use the beginning of your essay to showcase your personality and set yourself apart. Remember, the time you are spending to tailor your essay can be rewarded with a college debt free future.

  1. Submit scholarship applications early

Meet the deadlines and don’t wait until the due date. If the organization asks you to mail the application, don’t try to email it and if there is a maximum word count limit, don’t go over it. Most scholarship providers receive more qualified applications than available funds, so reduce your chances of being disqualified because you didn’t follow their requirements.

  1. Follow your passion

Apply for scholarships that fit your passion and interest. TFS has scholarships for everyone. The more personal the scholarship the higher your chances of winning!

  1. Increase your submission rate

The more applications you submit, the greater your chances are of winning scholarships. Treat applying for scholarships as a part-time job. Organize your free time and try to work on submitting one scholarship application every week and more during weekends. Remember if you spend 100 hours on submitting applications and win scholarships for $10,000 that is a really good part-time job!

TFS has been helping students for over 30 years and offers more than 7 million individual scholarships and more than $41 billion in aid. Visit tuitionfundingsources.com to learn more.

5 Things to Know About Maya Angelou’s Complicated, Meaningful Life

LinkedIn

It’s only fitting that the first week of U.S. National Poetry Month in April coincides with what would have been the 90th birthday of the poet Maya Angelou, who died May 28, 2014, at the age of 86.

But while she’s best known today for her writing — as the author of more than 30 books and the recipient of more than 50 honorary degrees — she had many different careers before becoming a writer, and all before the age of 40, as TIME pointed out in her 2014 obituary. Such jobs included: cook, waitress, sex-worker, dancer, actor, playwright, editor at an English-language newspaper in Egypt, Calypso singerand cast member of the opera Porgy and Bess. In fact, her name is more of a stage name than a pen name; she was born Marguerite Annie Johnson in St. Louis in 1928, but in the 1950s came up with “Maya Angelou,” which is a portmanteau of sorts, by combining her childhood nickname and a riff on her then-husband’s surname.

In a Google Doodle marking her April 4 birthday, she can be heard reading “Still I Rise,” alongside testimonials from her son Guy Johnson, Oprah Winfrey, Laverne Cox, Alicia Keys, America Ferrera, and Martina McBride. The 15-time Grammy-winner Keys calls her a “renaissance woman,” while 14-time Grammy nominee McBride says Angelou inspired her to write her own songs. Winfrey, who has called Angelou a mentor, says that “Maya Angelou is not what she has done or written or spoken, it’s how she did it all. She moved through the world with unshakeable calm, confidence, and a fiery, fierce grace and abounding love.”

Here are five things to know about the literary legend:

I Know Why the Caged Bird Sings was her first book

As the world marks her birthday in 2018, Maya Angelou’s breakout work is particularly relevant to the national conversation. Long before the #MeToo and #TimesUp movements brought sexual assault into the national conversation, she wrote in her 1969 memoir about her own experience with sexual trauma, and how her mother’s boyfriend raped her when she was a child. He was convicted and imprisoned, and after his release he was beaten to death, a series of events that led her to stop talking for a period.

“I thought I had caused his death because I told his name to the family…” she wrote in a 2013 op-ed in The Guardian. “I decided that my voice was so powerful that it could kill people.”

In an interview with Winfrey, Angelou said that, while some places banned the book because of the rape scene, she also believed the book had saved lives by providing a model of endurance. “I just read someplace that after a woman had read Caged Bird, she realized she wasn’t alone,” she told the media mogul. As she once said in another interview, “the encountering may be the very experience which creates the vitality and the power to endure.”

She was San Francisco’s first female African-American cable car conductor

“I loved the uniforms,” she once said to Oprah Winfrey, explaining why she wanted this particular job as a 16-year-old. Per her mother’s advice, she went to the city office that hired cable car conductors and sat there reading Russian literature until they agreed to hire her. Her mother got up with her at 4:00 a.m. for her daybreak shifts and trailed her in her car “with her pistol on the passenger seat” to keep an eye on her.

Continue onto TIME to read the complete article.

Winnie Madikizela-Mandela: Anti-apartheid campaigner dies at 81

LinkedIn
Winnie Mandela

South African anti-apartheid campaigner Winnie Madikizela-Mandela has died aged 81, her personal assistant says.

Winnie Madikizela-Mandela was the former wife of South Africa’s first black president, Nelson Mandela.

The couple – famously pictured hand-in-hand as Mr Mandela walked free from prison after 27 years – were a symbol of the anti-apartheid struggle for nearly three decades.

However, in later years her reputation became tainted legally and politically.

Family spokesman Victor Dlamini said Mrs Mandela “succumbed peacefully in the early hours of Monday afternoon surrounded by her family and loved ones” following a long illness, which had seen her go in and out of hospital since the start of the year.

Retired archbishop and Nobel laureate Desmond Tutu praised her as a “defining symbol of the struggle against apartheid”.

“Her courageous defiance was deeply inspirational to me, and to generations of activists,” he added.

President Cyril Ramaphosa – who Mrs Madikizela-Mandela praised earlier this year – is expected to visit the family home this evening, African National Congress (ANC) chairperson Gwede Mantashe said.

He added: “With the departure of Mama Winnie, [we have lost] one of the very few who are left of our stalwarts and icons. She was one of those who would tell us exactly what is wrong and right, and we are going to be missing that guidance.”

Energy Minister Jeff Radebe, reading out a statement on behalf of the family, paid tribute to “a colossus who strode the Southern African political landscape”.

“As the ANC we dip our revolutionary banner in salute of this great icon of our liberation struggle,” he said.

“The Mandela family are deeply grateful for the gift of her life and even as our hearts break at her passing we urge all those who loved her to celebrate this most remarkable South African woman.”

Mrs Madikizela-Mandela was born in 1936 in the Eastern Cape – then known as Transkei.

She was a trained social worker when she met her future husband in the 1950s. They were married for a total of 38 years, although for almost three decades of that time they were separated due to Mr Mandela’s imprisonment.

It was Mrs Madikizela-Mandela who took his baton after he was jailed for life, becoming an international symbol of resistance to apartheid and a rallying point for poor, black township residents who demanded their freedom.

Five years later, she too was jailed by the white minority government she was fighting against.

But Mrs Madikizela-Mandela – an icon of the struggle – also found herself mired in controversy.

She was heard backing the practice of “necklacing” – putting burning tyres around suspected informants’ necks – and was accused of conducting a virtual reign of terror in parts of Soweto by other members of the ANC in the late 1980s.

She was also found guilty of kidnapping and sentenced to six years’ imprisonment for her involvement in the death of 14-year-old township militant Stompie Seipei. She always denied the allegation, and the sentence was reduced to a fine.

Mr Mandela, who stood by her throughout the accusations, was finally released from prison in February 1990.

But two years later, their marriage crumbled. The couple divorced in 1996, but she kept his surname and maintained ties with him.

Continue onto BBC to read the complete article.

He applied to 20 of the best colleges and got a full ride to all of them

LinkedIn

Micheal Brown stared at the acceptance letter in front of him: It said yes.

So did the next one. And the one after that.

The 17-year-old from Houston applied to 20 of the best universities in the US. He was admitted to every single one with a full ride and $260,000 in additional scholarship offers.

“It’s something I’m proud of because I see my hard work paying off, determination paying off, sacrifices paying off,” the student told CNN.

Of those 20, he listed his top eight choices as: Harvard, Princeton, Northwestern, Yale, University of Pennsylvania, Stanford, Georgetown and Vanderbilt.

Currently a senior at Mirabeau B. Lamar High School, Micheal has been heavily involved in his school’s debate team, mock trial and student government for years. He has also volunteered for political campaigns, citing his interest to “the moment I saw Barack Obama get elected.”

He is set on majoring in political science, but is also considering a second degree in economics.

The first letter

When he received his first acceptance in December, he chose to do it at a friend’s house to relieve the pressure of being around his whole family.

“My family had high expectations and maybe didn’t realize how competitive the process is,” he said.

But he still invited his biggest supporter to come along — his mom.

Berthinia Rutledge-Brown filmed as Micheal stood in shock by the computer while his friends excitedly rallied around him.

Stanford, of course, said yes.

“After sixth grade, Mike was in control of his education,” recalled the proud mom. “He was focused, he knew what he wanted and he made his own decisions.”

Continue onto CNN to read the complete article.

First Museum Committed to Sharing the Stories of Historically Black Colleges Opens

LinkedIn
historically black colleges

The HBCU Museum in Washington, D.C., launched March 9 and has plans to expand to a second location in Atlanta.

In the mid-19th century, when just a scattering of traditionally white colleges in the United States were willing to accept black applicants, the first historically black colleges— the Institute for Colored Youth founded in 1837 (now Cheyney University of Pennsylvania), the Ashmun Institute in 1854 (now Lincoln University), and Wilberforce University in 1856—emerged to give African Americans access to higher education.

Though the end of the Civil War in 1865 brought the freedom and momentum for African American education to expand throughout the country, namely in the South, black students were largely still blocked from traditional instutions. So they continued to have to create their own.

According to ​Samara Freemark of American RadioWorks, black ministers and white philanthropists opened schools in church basements and people’s homes to give formerly enslaved individuals eager to learn an education in the South and beyond.

Some of these school eventually blossomed into full-fledged colleges and universities, and more than 100 of them, collectively known as historically black colleges and universities, or HBCUs, still exist today. And now, the first museum in the world dedicated to highlighting HBCUs has opened its doors, Anne Branigin reports for The Root.

Visitors at the museum, located in a 638-square-foot storefront on 7610A Georgia Ave NW, Washington, D.C., can see the history and impact of HBCUs on black culture in America through historic photos and memorabilia from the schools and some of their best-known graduates.

In an interview with the Washington Business Journal’s Rebecca Cooper, executive director Terrence Forte says he wants the museum to “bridge the gap for those who might not know about historically black college and universities’ stories.” Forte, who founded the museum with his family (both of Forte’s parents are graduates of Howard University), says the opening of the space, which serves as a welcoming center, is the first phase of a four-stage plan to open a larger for-profit museum in the D.C.

According to Smithsonian’s National Museum of African American History and Culture, more than 90 HBCUs were established between 1861 and 1900. (HBCUs are defined by the Higher Education Act of 1965 as a college or university established before 1964 with the mission of educating black Americans.)

Since then, black colleges have been responsible for some of the country’s most successful doctors, scientists and engineers. Though HBCUs represent just around 3 percent of colleges and universities in the U.S., according to 2016 statistics by the U.S. Department of Education, they’re responsible for 27 percent of African-American students graduating with bachelor’s degrees in STEM fields.

Continue onto the Smithsonian to read the complete article.

NOBLE Center for Excellence

LinkedIn
national organization of black law enforcement executives logo

The NOBLE Center for Excellence will serve as an official Community Policing Certification e-learning (CEU-POST) state of the art content hub for Law Enforcement Officers from across the globe to enhance building relationships between law enforcement and the community.

To further boost the capacity of the NOBLE Center for Excellence, we have partnered with the Attorney Benjamin Crump Social Justice Institute to make course content accessible in multiple platforms through a licensed online self-paced learning Virtual Campus system that is accessible 24/7/365 days a year allowing law enforcement departments or individual officers of the law to take courses through a digital live streaming television channel, mobile app, and a 21st Century Avatar virtual reality simulations that can activate on any mobile device, tablet or personal computer.

NOBLE is very excited and honored to be launching the NOBLE Center for Excellence. This is another step towards providing critical training to the law enforcement community and the nation,” stated Clarence E. Cox, III, NOBLE National President.

The NOBLE Center for Excellence Institute is open enrollment — click here to begin your selection of a program.

The 21st Century Community Policing POST-CEU online certification program is also open for enrollment – click here to enroll.

How to Avoid Scholarship Scams

LinkedIn
Scholarships

It’s no secret that scholarships are a great way to find free money for college. While it’s now easier than ever to search for scholarship opportunities online, easier navigation on the internet also makes it easier for online scammers.

Unfortunately, many families have fallen victim to scholarship scammers who are stealing millions of dollars from families every year. Your goal is to get money for college, and it shouldn’t cost you anything to apply for scholarships.

The good news is that there are red flags to look out for to avoid becoming the victim of a scholarship scam. A general rule of thumb – if it sounds too good to be true, it is. Learn the signs to protect yourself against being defrauded and find scholarships that are right for you. Here are 3 tips to avoid scholarship scams:

  1. Be cautious of fees: Applying for scholarships should not cost money. Be cautions of scholarships with application fees and never pay to get scholarship information. Scholarship databases are free and readily available online. Be on the lookout for phrases like “Guaranteed or your money back.” Scholarship websites can’t guarantee that you will win a scholarship because they’re not deciding on the winner. Legitimate scholarships won’t require an upfront fee when you submit the application.

TFS Scholarships

  1. Protect your data: Never reveal financial information such as your social security number, credit card numbers, checking information or bank account numbers to apply for scholarships. Scholarship scammers could use this information to commit identity theft.
  1. Get a second opinion: If you’re still unsure, talk with trusted organizations about which websites they recommend. School counselors, librarians, financial aid offices, and local community organizations have knowledge and tools to guide you in the right direction.

To help cut through the clutter, TFS Scholarships provides free educational resources to ease the academic journeys of students and families around the country. Sponsored by Wells Fargo, TFS Scholarships has been helping students for over 30 years and offers more than 7 million individual scholarships and more than $41 billion in aid. Visit tuitionfundingsources.com to learn more.

Dr. Cynthia Lindquist of Cankdeska Cikana Community College Named 2017 American Indian College Fund TCU Honoree of the Year

LinkedIn
american indian college fund logo

Ceremony Also Honors 34 Tribal College Students of the Year

The American Indian College Fund honored Dr. Cynthia Lindquist, President of Cankdeska Cikana Community College in Ft. Totten, North Dakota, for her outstanding contributions to American Indian higher education as its Tribal College and University Honoree of the Year. Dr. Lindquist, along with 34 American Indian scholarship recipients named as Students of the Year, were lauded at a reception hosted by the College Fund in Bismarck, North Dakota.

The program, sponsored by the Adolph Coors Foundation, awarded Dr. Lindquist a $1,000 honorarium and each student of the year a $1,200 scholarship.

Lindquist says she never set out to be a college president. “College was a dream for me as a high school kid. I was the oldest of 13 kids, and there was no money for college,” she says.

But thanks to her parents and both sets of grandparents raising her with a strong work ethic, college is exactly where she landed.

After graduating from high school Lindquist went to work for Sioux Manufacturing Corporation (SMC) as a secretary clerk in Ft. Totten. When the company was established, it was managed by white men from the Brunswick Corporation. But her tribe, the Spirit Lake Dakota, set the goal to train tribal members to become leaders in the company. She saw an opportunity for a higher education.

“I left being a secretary/clerk to get an undergraduate degree at University of North Dakota, and lo and behold, who was there but Karen Gayton Swisher and David Gipp (Who later became fellow tribal college presidents)! I was in college with other Indians!”

Lindquist says at the time there were not many other American Indian college students. But she persisted with her coursework from the 1970s to early 1980s, and returned to SMC with a bachelor’s degree in 1981. She became a manager.

“After five-six months, our chairman at the time, Elmer White, asked me to work for the tribe as the Health Director Planner. And that is how it all began. I was in that role for seven years. I got to know all about Indian health and health systems,” she says.

She went on to earn her master’s degree in public administration with an emphasis on Indian health systems from the University of South Dakota. For two-and-a-half years she studied while working and driving every two months to Rapid City, South Dakota—a 9- to 12-hour commute, depending on the weather.

“It was really intense. We got stuck in blizzards, you name it.” But she found that the opportunity for interacting with other Natives in the program were better this time: 15 of the 30 people in the program were Native, including Lynn Davis, the wife of Carty Monette, the former founding president of Turtle Mountain Community College.

native american woman

Like many of the people in her cohort, Lindquist says, “We never aspired to our roles. We were in the right place at the right time. Opportunity opened up. The self-determination movement was beginning around the late seventies and early eighties, and Indian Health Service (IHS) was working hard to establish Indian health programs.” Lindquist’s health career path eventually took her to doing Indian health work at the national level for IHS, working on a traditional medicine initiative for the agency. She was also the first political appointee for IHS, working as a Chief of Staff for the Director for the Clinton administration before returning to North Dakota, where she was appointed by Governor Ed Schafer as the Director of the North Dakota Indian Affairs Commission.

At the time of this interview, Lindquist had just returned from Washington D.C. for the American Indian Higher Education Consortium meetings at which tribal college presidents, faculty, staff, and students from across the country visited Capitol Hill to speak to elected officials to request funding support for TCUs and Native higher education.

Lindquist said, “When I reflect about last week, I realize we have come so far. Our students have a level of sophistication they didn’t have before. We do well to stress this while also emphasizing their culture, language, and Native values and what they mean. Education is really about being informed, seeing other sides, digging for information, while respecting other opinions and ideas and remaining grounded in our spirituality. Being Dakota means having a spiritual foundation, no matter what that is.”

During the time Lindquist was studying community medicine and rural health at Grand Forks working to establish an Indian health pathway to medical school, she was recruited by two tribal elders to apply for the position of president at Cankdeska Cikana Community College in her home community.

The transition was a logical one. In addition to hard work being a family value, education is, too. Lindquist’s mother was on the CCCC Board of Regents and was also a CCCC graduate “way before I became president.” Lindquist also had experience there, having taught classes when she was the tribe’s health director/planner.  She jumped at the chance.

“I have been there ever since. I love being back home, with my family, and with my Mom, who just turned 88 on Friday,” she said.

Things happen for a reason. Lindquist says her health care background equipped her perfectly for her role as a leader in a Native-serving higher education institution. “If people don’t have some concept of health and well-being, they cannot be a college student. You have to be physically, mentally, and spiritually healthy, and ask, ‘Am I a good role model?’”

Lindquist went on to earn a Ph.D. in educational leadership from the University of North Dakota in 2006. She used her educational path and healthcare grant-making experience to grow her campus. “I put in for every grant from multiple funding sources. I quadrupled the size of my campus in 15 years,” she says.

When she started at the college, it was housed “in a typical leftover federal building. The white walls were dirty and the building contained asbestos.” She wondered who would want to go to school there. After learning that abandoning the building was not an option due to financial investments the federal government and American Indian College Fund had made in it, she set to work cleaning it up.

“We made the renovations look seamless and tied the old in with the new,” she says. The campus buildings are now all connected, a necessity in the cold northern North Dakota winters.

In addition to physical growth, the college also doubled the number of graduates from when she started, maintains a reserve account, and has maintained spotless audits.

As a leader Lindquist says she is most proud of her college’s good data and transparency. “The community college belongs to the people. We want integrity there. We want to practice what we preach and give back to the community.”

Her employees share her commitment. Lindquist says they are devoted, resourceful, and efficient. “Ideally we should have one-third more employees, like a grant writer, a data specialist, and a transfer specialist. But we have good, qualified people. Our teachers drive 40-50 miles one way from small farming communities around the reservation. And when we have 40 graduates every May, we are as proud as could be. Many would not be college students without Cankdeska Cikana Community College.”

“There is a lot of historical trauma in our community. The suspicion of education in our communities still lingers. Slowly we are breaking it,” she says. She credits integrating prayer, culture, and language for that.

The role of a tribal college president isn’t just a job, it is a way of life for Lindquist. In addition to focusing her work on the Dakota way of life, her personal life reflects that, with a focus on prayer and family. She enjoys spending time in ceremonies and with her extended family of three children, eight grandchildren, and two great-grandchildren. She also enjoys gathering with other tribal college presidents, “Talking to each other, energizing each other, and helping keep things in perspective,” she says.

Lindquist’s Dakota name, Hoton Ho Waste Winyan, means Good Voice or Good Talk Woman, and was bestowed upon her in honor of her great grandmother. “To carry a Dakota name implies you speak the truth and from your heart,” she says.

And she carries it well.

“It’s good work. I am humbled and I am glad I am home and I am glad I got the experiences to be able to do what I do. It’s a privilege to do this work and know I have a team supporting me, all with the goal of student success.”

The 34 students named as Students of the Year are a testament to the hard work of the tribal college presidents as well as their individual commitments to education. The scholars honored include:

Aaniiih Nakoda College Shauntae St. Clair
Bay Mills Community College Alea Ward
Blackfeet Community College Lana Wagner
Cankdeska Cikana Community College Nicole Brown
Chief Dull Knife College Rebecca Cook
College of Menominee Nation Adam Schulz
College of the Muscogee Nation Dakota Kahbeah
Diné College Jordan Mescal
Fond du Lac Tribal and Community College Jeroam DeFoe
Fort Peck Community College Justin Gray Hawk Sr.
Haskell Indian Nations University Cody Lanyate
Illisagvik College Amber Downey
Institute of American Indian Arts Charlie Cuny
Keweenaw Bay Ojibwa Community College Joshua Robinson
Lac Courte Oreilles Ojibwa Com. College Melissa Knop
Leech Lake Tribal College Alicia Bowstring
Little Big Horn College Yolanda Turnsplenty
Little Priest Tribal College Kellen Kelsey
Navajo Technical University Ashley Joe
Nebraska Indian Community College Cornelia Farley-Widow
Northwest Indian College Frank Lawrence
Nueta Hidatsa Sahnish College Caley Fox
Oglala Lakota College Jamie White Face
Saginaw Chippewa Tribal College Patrick Nahgahgwon
Salish Kootenai College JoDawna Tso
Sinte Gleska University Pauline Jackson
Sisseton Wahpeton College Deborah Anderson
Sitting Bull College Kaylie Trottier
Southwestern Indian Polytechnic Institute Martinez Wagner
Stone Child College McKenzie Gopher
Tohono O’odham Community College Diana Antone
Turtle Mountain Community College Samantha Bercier
United Tribes Technical College Austin Cree
White Earth Tribal and Community College Corey Weaver

About the American Indian College Fund

Founded in 1989, the American Indian College Fund has been the nation’s largest charity supporting Native higher education for more than 28 years. The College Fund believes “Education is the answer” and provided 6,548 scholarships last year totaling $7.6 million to American Indian students, with more than 125,000 scholarships totaling over $100 million since its inception. The College Fund also supports a variety of academic and support programs at the nation’s 35 accredited tribal colleges and universities, which are located on or near Indian reservations, ensuring students have the tools to graduate and succeed in their careers. The College Fund consistently receives top ratings from independent charity evaluators, and received a four-star rating from Charity Navigator and is one of the nation’s top 100 charities named to the Better Business Bureau’s Wise Giving Alliance. For more information about the American Indian College Fund, please visit www.collegefund.org.

 

The American Indian College Fund Names 35 Native American First-Generation Scholars to Receive Coca Cola Foundation Scholarship

LinkedIn
american indian college fund logo

The American Indian College Fund and the Coca Cola Foundation honored 35 American Indian scholarship recipients at its 2017-18 Coca-Cola First Generation Scholarship banquet at the American Indian Higher Education Consortium Student Conference in Bismarck, North Dakota.

The Coca-Cola First Generation Scholarship was established for students who are the first in their families to attend college. The scholarships are renewable throughout the students’ tribal college careers if students maintain at least a 3.0 grade point average and show strong participation in campus and community life.

The following tribal college and university students were honored at the banquet for the 2017-18 academic year:

  • Aaniiih Nakoda College-Thomas Medicine Bear
  • Bay Mills Community College-Alea Ward
  • Blackfeet Community College-Laura Kipp
  • Cankdeska Cikana Community College-Lisa Jackson
  • Chief Dull Knife College-Cross Bearchum
  • College of Menominee Nation-Sabrina Hemken
  • College of the Muscogee Nation-Lucille Briggs
  • Dine College-Felisha Adams
  • Fond du Lac Tribal & Community College-Julie Isham
  • Fort Peck Community College-Jeromy Azure Jr
  • Haskell Indian Nations University-Thomas Berryhill
  • Ilisagvik College-Sarah Chagnon
  • Institute of American Indian Arts-Lashawn Medicine Horn
  • Keweenaw Bay Ojibwa Community College-Joshua Robinson
  • Lac Courte Oreilles Ojibwa Community College-David Butler
  • Leech Lake Tribal College-Alicia Bowstring
  • Little Big Horn College-Marissa Roth
  • Little Priest Tribal College-Shamika Benally
  • Navajo Technical University-Dolly Goodman
  • Nebraska Indian Community College-Vandy Merrick
  • Northwest Indian College-Sheila Cooper
  • Nueta Hidatsa Sahnish College-Tammy Hammer
  • Oglala Lakota College-Lindsay Masquat
  • Saginaw Chippewa Tribal College-Jennifer Arnold
  • Salish Kootenai College-Irene Augare
  • Sinte Gleska University-Johnna Waln
  • Sisseton Wahpeton College-Raegina Renville
  • Sitting Bull College-Kaylie Trottier
  • Sitting Bull College-Helen Wilkinson
  • Southwestern Indian Polytechnic Institute –Genevieve Waquie
  • Stone Child College-Jennifer Wolf Chief
  • Tohono O’odham Community College-Ashley Jose
  • Turtle Mountain Community College –Shania Jeanotte
  • United Tribes Technical College –Brittany Whitebird
  • White Earth Tribal and Community College-Shelly Weaver

About the American Indian College Fund

Founded in 1989, the American Indian College Fund has been the nation’s largest charity supporting Native higher education for more than 28 years. The College Fund believes “Education is the answer” and provided 6,548 scholarships last year totaling $7.6 million to American Indian students, with more than 125,000 scholarships totaling over $100 million since its inception. The College Fund also supports a variety of academic and support programs at the nation’s 35 accredited tribal colleges and universities, which are located on or near Indian reservations, ensuring students have the tools to graduate and succeed in their careers. The College Fund consistently receives top ratings from independent charity evaluators, and received a four-star rating from Charity Navigator and is one of the nation’s top 100 charities named to the Better Business Bureau’s Wise Giving Alliance. For more information about the American Indian College Fund, please visit www.collegefund.org.

Mae Jemison: Diversity In STEM Isn’t A Nicety, It’s A Necessity

LinkedIn
mae jemison

The first African-American woman in space discusses her agricultural science initiative.

Dr. Mae Jemison, the first African-American woman in space, knows firsthand the importance of exposing kids to STEM topics early. She also knows the significance of having kids see themselves in movies, on TV, and in certain careers.

“It means making sure that people get those images that show they have those things available to them,” Jemison told HuffPost.

Jemison is collaborating on “Science Matters,” an initiative to encourage kids of all ages and backgrounds to pursue agricultural science from pharmaceutical and life science company Bayer and youth development organization National 4-H Council. Jemison, a physician and chemical engineer, knows the field of agricultural science can sound intimidating, but she and Jennifer Sirangelo, CEO and president of the National 4-H Council, have set out to change that.

Digging into agricultural science can be as simple as asking, “Where does my food come from?” An increasingly popular way to kick-start this sort of interest is through urban gardens, Jemison explained.

“There’s nothing more exciting to see something growing ― and you can eat it!” Jemison said. “That’s something parents can do with their kids as well.”

Sirangelo agreed, noting that agricultural science is more than horticulture and animal science and has huge applications for our future.

“The need to produce more food with fewer resources over the coming decades is going to push our science even further,” she told HuffPost.

As Jemison put it, we need to prepare our kids “to not just survive, but thrive.”

Bringing more children into STEM topics like agricultural science isn’t enough, though. Diversity is imperative, especially for women and people of color, groups underrepresented in these fields, Jemison said.

“We’re losing talent and we’re losing capability by not including them,” she told HuffPost. “When people think about why it is important to have a diversity of talent in a field, they think of it as a nicety. No, it’s a necessity. We get better solutions.”

Continue onto the HuffingtonPost to read the complete article.

Odette Harris named America’s second female African-American neurosurgery professor at Stanford

LinkedIn
black female neurosurgeon

Odette Harris M.D. ’96 has made history by becoming America’s second African-American female professor of neurosurgery. Stanford’s department of neurosurgery announced her promotion on Tuesday.

Harris joins Lu Chen as the second female professor in the department of neurosurgery at the School of Medicine.

Harris, who specializes in traumatic brain injury, has served as the director of brain injury in the department of neurosurgery and the associate chief of staff of polytrauma and rehabilitation at the Palo Alto Veterans Administration Health Care System since 2009. Harris is also a Clayman Institute Faculty Research Fellow and was awarded the William P. Van Wagenen Fellowship Award from the American Association of Neurological Surgeons.

Harris said she developed a passion for the physical sciences and chemistry while studying at an all-girls high school.

“All those cliches about girl schools and empowering girls and women, I think they’re true,” Harris said in an interview with Stanford Medicine.

During her undergraduate years at Dartmouth College, Harris said she sought to surround herself with “strong women.”

It was not until she attended Stanford School of Medicine that she said she experienced a “turning point both in terms of gender and race.” Harris was the only black woman in the School of Medicine’s class of 1996. She was also one of only two women during her neurosurgical residency at Stanford University Medical Center.

Nonetheless, Harris described her experience in medical school and residency as a positive one.

“My mentor was a white man who is blond and as East Coast as can be,” Harris said. “His skin color was irrelevant, as was mine to his experience of mentoring me.”

Continue onto Stanford University’s Newsroom to read the complete article.

Howard University Unveils New Bloomberg Lab

LinkedIn
howard university at bloomberg

Howard University School of Business (HUSB) recently unveiled its new Bloomberg Finance Lab in front of a standing-room only crowd of students, faculty and alumni. The lab, made possible through a generous $250,000 gift from alumnus Wendell E. Mackey, CFA, will be used to prepare students to excel in finance-related fields.

“We are extremely appreciative of Mr. Mackey’s donation to the Howard University School of Business, which not only supports the Bloomberg Finance Lab, but also student scholarships,” said President Dr. Wayne A. I. Frederick. “In this full circle moment, we get to witness a student who once benefited from a quality Howard education, return to give back so that the next generation of students can experience the same.”

Mackey fondly recalls taking photos in front of the then newly constructed School of Business on the day of his graduation ceremony in 1986. It was in that moment that he vowed to one day give back to his alma mater. Today, Mackey is a Founder, Co-Chief Executive Officer, and Chief Investment Officer for Channing Capital Management, LLC in Chicago.

“I am honored to present this gift to Howard University on behalf of myself and Channing Capital Management. I also want to thank my great business partners Rodney Herenton and Eric McKissack for their support along our journey together,” said Mackey. “The skills that the students will achieve with the added benefit of utilizing a Bloomberg Finance Lab will be invaluable to their careers.”

The Bloomberg Terminal is a software platform that provides real-time and historical data, market moving news and analytics to help leading business and financial professionals worldwide make better informed investment decisions. The service also features execution platforms for every asset class, research and a global network to communicate securely and reliably. Howard University has contracted to have 12 Terminals with two Terminals earmarked for economics and computer science students.

“We are thrilled to partner with Howard University and offer its students and professors access to the same market-moving news and data relied on by leading business and financial professionals around the globe,” said Erika Irish Brown, Bloomberg’s Global Head of Diversity & Inclusion. “We hope that Bloomberg Finance Lab’s training and coursework will give Howard students seeking careers in financial services an additional competitive edge, while also familiarizing Howard’s computer science students with the technology underlying the Bloomberg Terminal.”

“The Bloomberg Lab will greatly enhance the academic skills of our undergraduate and graduate students in finance, accounting, marketing, supply chain and management, and enhance their professional marketability,” said Barron Harvey, Ph.D., dean of the Howard University School of Business. “In addition, the lab will greatly impact the research productivity of our dedicated faculty in the School of Business.”

Continue onto the Howard University Newsroom to read the complete article.

America's Leading African American Business and Career Magazine