How African-American Olympian ANITA L. DEFRANTZ Helped Change the World

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Anita DeFrantz

LOS ANGELES (October 2, 2017) – Anita L. DeFrantz is a Bronze medal-winning Olympic rower; Attorney; Activist; Vice President of the International Olympic Committee; Multiple Sclerosis fighter;Speaker; and Humanitarian.

She has been a trailblazer as an Olympic athlete, during a time when women – especially women of color – were invisible.

Today, DeFrantz unveils her fascinating life and significant accomplishments in her new book My Olympic Life: A Memoir. Readers will find this modern-day heroine provides a wealth of inspiration and encouragement in these pages, and not just for current and aspiring athletes, women and minorities.

Gloria Steinem said, “Just reading My Olympic Life will make your heart race, your mind expand, and your hopes rise. That’s the kind of life Anita DeFrantz has lived, as a child in an activist family, an Olympic champion fighting for fairness, and a leader challenging limits of race and sex. Everyone needs her story…”

With unwavering tenacity, Anita L. DeFrantz has fought against sexual harassment, helped to change outdated gender verification rules, cracked down on doping, influenced new eligibility requirements, and helped maintain the integrity of the Olympic Movement. She even took on President Jimmy Carter when he tried to use the Olympics as a political forum during the Cold War.

Surely, it is DeFrantz’s boldness, clarity of vision and personal courage that has led this exemplary woman to rise to become the seventh-ranking member in seniority of the International Olympic Committee (IOC). She currently serves on the IOC Executive Board, and as one of the IOC’s four Vice Presidents.

In this riveting book, co-authored with five-time New York Times bestselling author Josh Young, DeFrantz reveals how she emerged from racist threats during her Indiana childhood to exhibiting unwavering leadership and ever-growing influence in Olympic circles to fight sexual harassment and racism, grow women’s Olympic sports, influence new eligibility requirements, change outdated gender verification rules, and more. She even delves into hot-button Olympic issues like doping and political scandals.

Reading My Olympic Life will reveal why DeFrantz has been named one of the “150 Women Who Shake the World” by Newsweek and one of the “101 Most Influential Minorities in Sports” by Sports Illustrated.

Much more than a celebration of advancements in women’s or civil rights, more than a tale of her Olympic victories, My Olympic Life reveals how one motivated, courageous, and passionate person can truly help change the world.

For media inquiries and interview opportunities contact:
Tracy McCormick
310.766.7560 mobile

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5 Better Questions to Ask at the End of an Interview Than “What’s a Typical Day Like?”

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interview

The interview questions you choose to ask at the end of of your meeting tell hiring managers almost as much about you as your answers to their questions.

Unfortunately, the same “good” questions have become more and more widely used, meaning interviewers are now used to being asked things like, “What would my first month on the job look like?” or “What makes someone in this role highly successful?”

Don’t get me wrong, those are great—but they don’t distinguish you from the other candidates.

That’s why I’ve come up with five thoughtful, interesting, and most importantly, new options to pose during your next interview. Not only will you get some good insights, but you’ll be more memorable as well.

1. Which Experience Prepared You the Most for This One, and Why?

What This Says About You: You’ll learn quickly. Rather than starting from scratch, you’ll be actively focusing on applying what you’ve learned in previous positions to your new role.

What This Tells You: From the hiring manager’s answer, you should get a better sense of the office environment and how your future team operates.

Let’s say she responds, “I spent three years working for a small startup—that experience has come in handy, because even though this company is much bigger, we’ve got that startup, ‘If you see it, fix it’ ethos.’”

Well, that very plainly tells you this company values autonomy, humility, and initiative.

2. What Makes This Office Special?

What This Says About You: You’re not just looking for any job. You care about finding the right fit.

What This Tells You: Whether or not this company would be good for you, day in and day out.

Maybe the hiring manager says, “We’re all huge sports fans. Each month, the entire company attends a local game.” If you’d rather clean your bathroom than sit through a single inning of a baseball game, this probably isn’t the company for you.

3. Why Are You Excited About Hiring a New Person in This Role?

What This Says About You: You care about your boss’ goals and how your work will drive the organization forward.

What This Tells You: Whether the hiring manager’s vision of the job aligns with yours, as well as what he or she prioritizes.

For example, you might be jazzed about this project analyst position because you want to identify and solve inefficiences. But the hiring manager says he’s looking forward to having someone be a liaison between multiple departments.

4. I Know One of Your Company Values Is [Value Here]. How Does That Manifest Itself in the Workplace?

What This Says About You: You want to work somewhere with integrity—and you understand the difference between intentions and actions. Also, you did your research!

What This Tells You: If the hiring manager can’t give you a good answer, that’s a clue the organization is, well, talking the talk without walking the walk.

Here’s what a good answer might look like:

“Yes, one of our core values is openness, and openness definitely influences much of how we do things. Every Friday, our entire team gets together for a town hall meeting where anyone can ask anything they’d like. I can’t remember a single time our CEOs have rejected a question. Also, we use Slack to communicate, and unless a conversation is clearly sensitive or confidential, it takes place in one of our public channels.”

5. What’s the Typical Leadership Style Here?

What This Says About You: You’re looking for a productive, mutually beneficial relationship between you and your supervisor.

What This Tells You: Whether or not your working style will mesh with your (maybe) boss’.

Continue on to The Muse to read the complete article

TIAA Unveils the TIAA Difference Maker 100 Recognizing Extraordinary People Helping to Create a Better Tomorrow

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Laila-Ali-TIAA

TIAA recently announced the TIAA Difference Maker 100 Honorees – 100 individuals working in the nonprofit sector who have made significant contributions in their communities and throughout the world. TIAA will recognize each of the 100 honorees with a $10,000 donation in their name to the nonprofit organization they support, totaling $1 million in contributions.

The Difference Maker 100 program launched earlier this year as part of TIAA’s centennial to recognize the positive impact nonprofit employees have on the world. Individuals were invited to submit their own story or recommend others for consideration. The final Difference Maker 100 Honorees were selected by a panel of judges based on their impact, creativity, perseverance and motive.

“We could think of no better way to commemorate our centennial than to celebrate the people we have a mission to serve – the millions of nonprofit professionals driven by purpose and service – and to help enable them to continue having a positive impact on the world,” said Roger W. Ferguson, Jr., president and CEO of TIAA. “We were delighted to receive over 4,000 submissions.  Each represents an inspiring story that epitomizes what it means to be a difference maker.”

The 100 honorees represent a wide range of nonprofit organizations from across the United States focused on social impact issues, health and wellness, education and technology, arts and culture, and the environment. TIAA teamed up with Oath and RYOT Studio to create and produce the TIAA Difference Maker 100 program.

Laila Ali, pictured, world-class athlete and a prominent supporter of charitable organizations, served as the ambassador for the program.

“I had the opportunity to review many of the amazing stories submitted by people working in nonprofit organizations across the country and was inspired by each and every one,” said Laila Ali. “The individuals who are being recognized today are selfless in their commitment to serving others. I am sure their stories will move more people to do good in the world.”

As part of its centennial celebration, TIAA also hosted a companywide “100 Days of Difference” campaign that enabled TIAA employees to take part in philanthropic and community service-oriented projects across the country. It was the largest employee volunteerism program in the company’s 100-year history. More than 9,550 employees across 51 offices completed 389 service projects that impacted 717,548 lives in 100 days.

For more information about the TIAA Difference Maker 100 Honorees and the program, visit TIAADifferenceMaker100.org.

The TIAA Difference Maker 100 Honorees include:
Ismail Abdurrashid (Boston, Mass.) – College Bound Dorchester
Chike Aguh (Beltsville, Md.) – EveryoneOn
Jeanne Alter (Astoria, N.Y.) – Kennedy Children’s Center
Kimberly Appelt (New Canaan, Conn.) – Harlem Lacrosse and Leadership Corporation
Suzanne Baker (Livonia, Mich.) – Blessings in a Backpack-Livonia
Nancy Ballard (Petaluma, Calif.) – Rooms That Rock 4 Chemo, Inc.
Susan Binkley (Monteagle, Tenn.) – Blue Monarch
Melissa Blackmon (Clayton, N.C.) – Donate Life North Carolina
Eva Bornstein (New York, N.Y.) – Lehman College Center for the Performing Arts, Inc.
Caroline Boudreaux (Austin, Texas) – Miracle Foundation
Garry Bowie (Long Beach, Calif.) – Being Alive: People Living with AIDS Action Coalition
Breanna Branch (Oakland, Calif.) – uAspire
Stephanie Burch (Hampton, Va.) – Virginia Beach Justice Initiative
Ron Byrne (Altamont, N.Y.) – Umbrella of the Capital District, Inc.
Evelyn Calip (Harbor City, Calif.) – Evelyn’s Breast Friends Forever, Inc.
Rebecca Campbell (Sarasota, Fla.) – Children of Fallen Soldiers Relief Fund, Inc.
Laura Capello (Phoenix, Ariz.) – Big Brothers Big Sisters of Central Arizona
Marcelo Cardarelli (Fairfax, Va.) – The William Novick Global Cardiac Alliance
Christopher Cooley (Pittsburg, Pa.) – Serving Other Souls, Inc.
Gary Cornwell (Gainesville, Fla.) – Florida Camp for Children and Youth with Diabetes, Inc.
Paula Daniels (LaVergne, Tenn.) – Mid-Cumberland Community Action Agency
Sharon Darling (Louisville, Ky.) – National Center for Families Learning
Lisa DeSantis (Paramus, N.J.) – Consortium of Multiple Sclerosis Centers
Liz Dunbar (Tacoma, Wash.) – Tacoma Community House
Grace Feldman (New Haven, Conn.) – Neighborhood Music School
Mary Ellen Fitzgerald (Abington, Pa.) – Breathing Room Foundation
Sister Teresa Fitzgerald (Astoria, N.Y.) – Hour Children, Inc.
Jaclyn Fratangelo (Pleasanton, Calif.) – Abilities United
Sarah Garman (Pembroke Pines, Fla.) – North Campus Food Pantry for Students
Roger Gonzalez (El Paso, Texas) – LIMBS International
Debbie Greenberg (St. Louis, Mo.) – A Million Stars, Inc. DBA College Bound St. Louis
Inger Griffin (Livonia, Mich.) – The Emily Ann Griffin Foundation
Pete Griffin (Nashville, Tenn.) – Musicians On Call
Abigail Harrison (Wellesley, Mass.) – The Mars Generation
Tera Hilliard (Hawthorne, Calif.) – Forgotten Children, Inc.
Barbara Hoffman (Gilbert, Ariz.) – Red Means Stop Coalition
Nancy Hughes (Eugene, Ore.) – StoveTeam International, Ore.
Jill Isenbarger (Pelham, N.Y.) – The Stone Barns Center for Food & Agriculture
Kanti Jain (Alpine, N.J.) – International Human Benefit Services
Rosemarie Jefferson (Philadelphia, Pa.) – Inn Dwelling
Mary Keane (Yonkers, N.Y.) – You Gotta Believe
Alex Landberg (Des Plaines, Ill.) – Chicago Run
Marianne Legato (New York, N.Y.) – Foundation Gender-Specific Medicine
Shari Lewis (Chicago, Ill.) – Project H.O.O.D.
Dan Lill (Rochester, N.Y.) – R Community Bikes, Inc.
Danielle Maloof (Glendora, Calif.) – Save the Heartbeat, Calif.
Albert Manero (Orlando, Fla.) – Limbitless Solutions
Jerria Martin (Selma, Ala.) – Drug Free Communities of Dallas County
Kerri Martin (Asbury Park, N.J.) – Second Life Bikes
Kyle Matthews (Tampa, Fla.) – Beat Nb Cancer Foundation, Inc.
Michael McGuire (Jacksonville, Fla.) – River Oak Center
Gayle McPherson (Winfield, Kan.) – Eagle Nest, Inc.
Jennifer McVoy (Grand Haven Township, Mich.) – Out Side In, Inc.
Jeri Millard (Jacksonville, Fla.) – In the Pink Boutique, Inc.
Stacy Moore (Philomath, Ore.) – Institute for Applied Ecology
Brian Morello (Oakland, N.J.) – Family Reach Foundation
Sheila Morovati (Santa Monica, Calif.) – Crayon Collection
Rick Nahmias (Van Nuys, Calif.) – Food Forward
Darlene Nakayama (Honolulu, Hawaii) – Palolo Chinese Home
Staci Nichols (Little Falls, N.Y.) – Herkimer County Chapter, NYSARC, Inc. DBA Arc Herkimer
Keith Norris (Elkton, Va.) – World Hope International
Gary Oberstein (Walpole, Mass.) – Above the Clouds
Elizabeth O’Donnell (Hamburg, N.Y.) – Gliding Stars, Inc.
Jodi O’Donnell-Ames (Titusville, N.J.) – Hope Loves Company, Inc.
Lynn Olson (Minneapolis, Minn.) – Language Central, Inc.
John Orr (Philadelphia, Pa.) – Art-Reach, Inc.
Robert Picard (Pocatello, Idaho) – Health West, Inc.
Lee Ponsky, MD (Moreland Hills, Ohio) – MedWish International
Cathy Poznik (Twinsburg, Ohio) – Chiari and Syringomyelia Foundation
Tyler Radford (Kew Gardens, N.Y) – Humanitarian OpenStreetMap Team
Julie Rasmuson (Stewartstown, Pa.) – Autism York
Diana Richardson (Eugene, Ore.) – Makindu Children’s Program
Michelle Roberts (Powhatan, Va.) – Miracles in Motion
Heather Rossi (Cary, N.C.) – Centerstone Military Services
Sharon Runge (Catonsville, Md.) – Kenya Connect
Nicole Russell (Guttenberg, N.J.) – Precious Dreams Foundation
David Sack (Fallston, Md.) – Child Health Foundation
Miesha Sanders (Saint Paul, Minn.) – Parent Teacher Home Visits
Jessica Schreiber (New York, N.Y.) – FABSCRAP, Inc.
Angela Settle (Charleston, W.Va.) – West Virginia Health Right, Inc.
Bette Sherman (Denton, Texas) – Denton Animal Support Foundation, Inc.
James Short (La Jolla, Calif.) – Padres Pedal the Cause
Aaron Slatton (New Haven, Ind.) – Indiana Institute of Technology
Michael Slaymaker (Orlando, Fla.) – Orlando Youth Alliance
Julia Sleeper-Whiting (Lewiston, Maine) – Tree Street Youth
Robin Smalley (Los Angeles, Calif.) – mothers2mothers
Timothy Solberg (St. Louis, Mo.) – Project Medishare for Haiti
Sister Peg Spindler (Gary, Ind.) – Sojourner Truth House
Nicole Steele (Lawrenceville, Ga.) – Diamond In The Rough Youth Development Program, Inc.
Jarrett Stein (Philadelphia, Pa.) – Rebel Ventures
Elizabeth Swiman (Tallahassee, Fla.) – Florida State University
Kyle Thomas (Crested Butte, Colo.) – Peace of Adventure
Christine Thompson (Boydton, Va.) – Humanity Road, Inc.
Marianna Tu (Brooklyn, N.Y.) – America Needs You
Kathleen Webb (Wichita, Kan.) – Children First CEO Kansas

Sophie Wysocki (Broomfield, Colo.) – Agape International Missions

About TIAA
With an award-winning 1 track record for consistent investment performance, TIAA (TIAA.org) is the leading provider of financial services in the academic, research, medical, cultural and government fields. TIAA has $1 trillion in assets under management (as of 6/30/2018 2) and offers a wide range of financial solutions, including investing, banking, advice and education, and retirement services.

20 Companies That Champion LGBTQ Equality Hiring Now

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By: 

From marketing campaigns, core company values and public support of Equality, to hiring and health care benefits–corporate America can be a champion for LGBTQ equality when they demonstrate their true commitment. Whether that’s through public support, partnerships with LGBTQ organizations, policy support or a commitment to a safe and accepting workplace, it’s important to recognize what companies are truly advocating for LGBTQ rights, especially if you identify as LGBTQ and want to work for a company that is going to welcome and support you.

In 2018, there are multiple companies, big and small, that champion LGBTQ equality hiring – and these places are hiring now! So whether you are an LGBTQ-identifying candidate or an ally that wants to work for an inclusive company, both in and out of the workplace, then you’ll want to send your resume to the following businesses.

1. Uber

How they support LGBTQ Equality: With UberPride, the company is building a diverse and inclusive workplace specifically focused on making LGBTQ individuals feel welcomed. The company is actively promoting LGBTQ rights in cities they operate. The company has received a score of 100 for HRC’s Corporate Equality Index (CEI) over the past two years. Uber’s new Pride site states, “While everyone may look, think, and feel differently, Pride is a time when we’re all uniting for the same thing—equality. From the front seat to the back, inside the car and out, Uber stands with our global LGBTQ+ community on this journey, today and every day.”

What employees say: “I love being able to work around truly passionate people who are ready to change the world.” –

2. Baker McKenzie

How they support LGBTQ Equality: Does pro bono work and pushes for LGBTI inclusion, diversity and anti-discrimination policies. “Everyone should feel comfortable in the workplace, regardless of their sexual orientation or gender identity and expression,” says Baker McKenzie. “We are committed to creating and maintaining an open and supportive working environment. This includes equal opportunity for advancement and development within the firm regardless of sexual orientation, gender identity or expression, and the equal provision of benefits to same and opposite sex partners or spouses.”

What employees say: “The reputation as the “friendly” law firm is justly deserved, vast majority of staff are incredibly warm and open-minded people.”  – Current Employee

3. Google

How they support LGBTQ Equality: Various partnerships with LGBTI organizations that protect workers against employment discrimination and the company often promotes inclusion in marketing campaigns. “The Gayglers is comprised of LGBT Googlers and their allies,” says the Google Diversity site. “The group not only leads the way in celebrating Pride around the world, but also informs programs and policies, so that Google remains a workplace that works for everyone.”

What employees say: “High pay, liberal culture, smart coworkers.” – Current Employee

4. IBM

How they support LGBTQ Equality: Contributes to a variety of LGBTI organizations and established an equal pay and equal opportunity act well before the Civil Rights Act. “We were among the first companies to include sexual orientation as part of our Equal Opportunity policy, and we extended domestic partner benefits to gay and lesbian employees in the U.S. almost 20 years ago,” Chief Diversity Officer Lindsay-Rae McIntyre told Glassdoor last year. “And our progress has not stopped. We now offer a variety of benefits in 53 countries to same-gender domestic partners or spouses. This year alone we announced the launch of same-gender partner benefits in 11 countries.”

What employees say: “The working culture and environment is good here.” – Former Employee

5. IKEA Group

How they support LGBTQ Equality: Developed fully inclusive work environments and known for having more than half its workforce made of minorities and 47% of its employees are women. Each company location has its own diversity and inclusion ambassador. On May 17th, IKEA Group celebrated IDAHOT (International Day Against Homophobia, Biphobia And Transphobia) to stand up for the rights of lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, and people of all sexual orientations and gender identities. In 2018, IKEA’s focus is on transgender inclusion.

What employees say: “friendly, casual atmosphere, great benefits, competitive pay compared to other area employers, company seems to actually care about its employees.” – Current Employee

6. Microsoft

How they support LGBTQ Equality: Consistently earns a perfect rating with HRC’s Corporate Equality Index (CEI) and constantly advocates for marginalized groups. “GLEAM is the lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender (LGBT+) employee resource group at Microsoft. GLEAM members interact through programs such as: Ignite talks, lunches, cross-corporate LGBT+ networking, sporting events, cultural activities, discussions with community leaders about gender and sexuality, volunteering, and fundraising for local LGBT+ organizations.” In fact, in 1993, Microsoft was one of the first companies in the world to offer employee benefits to same-sex domestic partners.

What employees say: “Amazing Company 10/10 would recommend.” – Current Employee

7. PayPal

How they support LGBTQ Equality: Refused to expand following the North Carolina passage of House Bill2 and consistently promotes and advocates for equality rights and inclusion. “PayPal’s LGBTQ network, PayPal Pride, celebrates and furthers our commitment to inclusion and diversity and support for our LGBTQ employees and allies. We host 16 chapters across six countries. In 2017, for the sixth consecutive year, PayPal earned a perfect rating of 100 percent from the Human Rights Campaign Corporate Equality Index, making it one of HRC’s “Best Places to Work” for lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender employees.”

What employees say: “I loved almost everyone I worked with at PayPal. I was able to maintain a healthy work/life balance. The benefits were great too!” – Former Employee

8. Simmons & Simmons LLP

How they support LGBTQ Equality: “The Simmons & Simmons lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender (LGBT) network was set up in 2006. The network is open to all Simmons & Simmons partners and employees and has the overarching aim of providing support to members of the LGBT community and providing the firm with practical assistance in addressing LGBT issues,” saystheir site. “LGBT network members play active roles in the InterLaw Diversity Forum for LGBT networks, an inter-organizational forum for the LGBT networks in law firms and all personnel (lawyers and non-lawyers) in the legal sector, including in-house counsel.”

What employees say: “Good work-life balance and supportive, friendly environment.” –  Former Employee

9. Coca-Cola

How they support LGBTQ Equality: Partnered with the Human Rights Campaign and has a perfect score with CEI. Was among the first to support the new U.N. standards for LGBTI rights. “With an active LGBTQA Business Resource Group (BRG) in operation for almost 15 years, Coca-Cola has been on the forefront of ensuring equality for its LGBTQ associates. In 2011, the company began offering transgender-inclusive health insurance coverage and in 2015 it began assisting with the costs of taxes imposed on eligible U.S. employees whose same-sex spouse or partner was enrolled in health benefits and who lived in states that did not recognize same-sex marriage.”

What employees say: “The Coca-Cola Co offers good opportunities for career growth and good employee benefits. The environment is also very attractive.” – Former Employee

10. Gap Inc.

How they support LGBTQ Equality: Active support of LGBT rights and partners with organizations such as GLAAD for campaigns. “As a company with a nearly 50-year history of promoting equality for all, Gap Inc. kicked off Pride Monthwith opportunities for employees and customers to celebrate through Pride parades, colorful window displays and special product from the brands.”

What employees say: “Gap has treated me better than any previous jobs.” – Current Employee

Read the complete list of companies and more at Glassdoor.

This black female entrepreneur is rebuilding D.C. with foreign dollars—and a dream

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Angelique Brunner was once the only African American woman in VC from NYC to Atlanta. Now, she runs a $500 million investment firm that is revitalizing D.C.

When Angelique Brunner moved to the nation’s capital two decades ago, she was shocked to find neighborhoods with no stores, no services, and burned-out buildings.

“I started asking around about what is going on here, people told me it was the riots,” she tells Fast Company. “I said, ‘Oh, what riots?’ They said, ‘The Martin Luther King riots.’ I said, ‘The riots were in 1968. So, this is why D.C. doesn’t have grocery stores, and it’s giving away houses for a dollar?’”

The local city government was, in fact, selling off long-abandoned homes for a buck to developers who had the money to rebuild. Some of Washington’s once vibrant black neighborhoods never quite recovered from the unrest in the days following the assassination of the civil rights leader and the subsequent departure of the middle class.

Brunner was stunned and, armed with her degrees in public policy from Brown and Princeton, started learning the ropes in venture capital and then real estate development—determined to make a difference.

And she is making a difference, bringing jobs, homes, and new business to once blighted streets.

As president of EB5 Capital, which she founded a decade ago, Brunner is now one of the driving forces in the revitalization of D.C., leveraging a controversial program that puts rich foreign investors on a path to citizenship in return for their investment dollars.

FOUNDING HER OWN COMPANY

The road to founding her own firm was paved during those first years, initially at a VC firm. “I  was the only African American female from New York to Atlanta that was in venture capital.” She later moved to Fannie Mae (the Federal National Mortgage Association), where she became an expert in community investing.

“Laypeople might assume that urban areas struggle to get development dollars because no one wants to build there. I learned through the late 1990s and early 2000s that there has always been interest, just not the financing needed to actually execute,” she says.

It was during this time that she became familiar with the EB-5 Immigrant Investor Program and saw an opportunity to bring development dollars to neighborhoods that others did not want to touch. So with the gap in money needed persisting to complete urban projects, and the scars from the riots still showing, she founded EB5 Capital.

“I felt motivated to address this, which is why my second project ever was a grocery store on 7th Street in Northwest D.C. that also had an affordable senior housing component,” she says.

Since then, Brunner has helped connect foreign investors with several major D.C. gems, including City Market at O Street, bringing new residential and commercial life to a once dilapidated but beloved historic city site. Brunner is also behind D.C.’s Columbia Place development, bringing two new Marriott hotels to the downtown convention center area.

JOB CREATOR

Brunner sees her mission as twofold: Rebuilding the capital’s neighborhoods and bringing new jobs to people who desperately need them. And she is an unabashed fan of the EB-5 program, which is up for renewal—and reform—in U.S. Congress. Job creation is at the core of the program, which was founded in 1990 and is administered by U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS). It offers foreign investors green cards in return for job-creating investments in domestic development projects.

Continue onto Fast Company to read the complete article.

What the Number of Years You’ve Spent at a Company Says About You, According to a Recruiter

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Resume

Here’s some insider info: One thing recruiters go back and forth on all the time is what the number of years you’ve spent at a company says about you professionally.

And while I can’t speak for all hiring managers, I can tell you all the questions I used to ask myself when reviewing dates listed on a resume, why they made me hesitate, and how you can address any issues right off the bat in your cover letter.

6 Months (or Less): Was This His Choice or His Employer’s Choice?

A common rule of thumb is that you should stay with a company for at least a year, even if you’re not totally pumped about your job. The reality is that, for a number of reasons, some people just don’t end up doing that. Sometimes that means people were part of a big layoff, they discovered the job wasn’t what they expected, or they got an amazing offer that they couldn’t turn down.

How to Address It

There is one surefire way of answering questions about the shorter stops on your resume. And that’s to be as honest as possible on your cover letter, even if you were let go. However, don’t harp on the fact that you were only there for a few months. Instead, use this space to highlight what you were able to accomplish in that short amount of time.

Exactly 1 Year: Why Has This Person Bounced Around So Many Times?

Going back to that common “one-year” rule of thumb, some candidates I reviewed really took that to heart. And by that, I mean their resumes were littered with jobs they spent exactly a year doing. While it was up to me to look past this if it was clear someone might be a good fit for a job I was hiring for, it was absolutely something I’d think about. Is he or she actually interested in working for our company, or just a job-hopper looking to continue his or her climb up the ladder?

How to Address It

Here’s the thing—it’s great to be motivated to keep moving up. But if you have a number of one-year stints on your resume, take some time to think about your career story before you apply. Your cover letter is the first (and only, in some cases) chance you’ll get to tell the hiring manager that you don’t consider his company just another step along the way. Emphasize why all of those experiences have led you to apply for this job.

1-3 Years: Has This Person Been Promoted?

This is a really solid amount of time to spend with one company. However, one thing I always looked for was upward mobility, at least in the amount of responsibilities a candidate with this much tenure at a company was given. While that didn’t necessarily mean I was only looking at people whose titles changed over their time with the company, I wasn’t exactly excited about someone who made it clear he or she was comfortable doing the same type and amount of work for three years in a row.

How to Address It

Odds are that even if you didn’t get an official promotion, you were given additional responsibilities over time. So, use your cover letter to walk recruiters through these additions. Titles rarely tell the full story, and most people understand that. Take this opportunity to make that clear—rather than breezing past it in hopes the person won’t notice.

Author-Richard Moy

Continue on to The Muse to read the complete article and also check out amazing companies hiring now!

The Career Path I Didn’t Consider (But Should Have)

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Start-up company employees

I graduated from college in 1993 and got a job at Fidelity Investments as a customer service representative. It was a prestigious company in Boston, and after majoring in English, I was delighted to have an opportunity to be trained in something in the financial services industry. It seemed practical and, at such a big and eminent organization, opportunities to climb the corporate ladder seemed limitless.

It didn’t take me long before I realized that, no matter how limitless the opportunities seemed, moving up the corporate ladder would be slow and require navigating tons of bureaucracy. I also didn’t like working odd-hour shifts, having my bathroom breaks monitored, or having to explain to crackpots why their mutual fund account went down that day.

I knew I was unhappy, but I had no idea what else was out there in the world for someone without much work experience.

One of my biggest regrets from my 20s is that I didn’t know how to explore career options. And more specifically, I did not understand the concept of startups or equity. I thought working was about working for salary. But if you go to work for a startup, especially early on, you’ll get something else: stock (or “equity”) in the company. And if the startup you work for succeeds, the stock you get could end up being worth significantly more than your salary.

As a new grad in Boston in the 90s, I had no concept of this. But an ambitious person graduating from college today should think about it. There are a lot more startups today, and you can in effect become an early investor in one by going to work for it.

Startups are companies that are designed to grow fast, usually because of technology. They usually represent new ideas that never existed before or that are a drastic improvement over what was previously available. Startups typically begin with just a few people and grow rapidly once the company figures out its product and secures funding.

Yes, startups are very risky, and they often fail. But when they don’t fail, their stock can become quite valuable.

I wish I’d taken a job as an early employee at a startup and gotten some equity when I graduated from college. I didn’t have tons of experience but, boy, did I work hard and care about the work I did. Startups often have more flexibility on hiring people without credentials. They don’t have corporate ladders, just stuff that needs to get done. You can often join doing one thing, learn on the job quickly, and work on something more important very soon, if you are effective enough.

Check Out Amazing Startups Hiring Now!

Continue on to The Muse to read the complete article

4 on-campus jobs that can set you up for success after graduation

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Lab assistant positions offer students interested in the sciences unparalleled professional experience, not to mention high wages. PayScale estimates that college laboratory assistants make around $14.62 an hour on average.

But Lakhani says that working as a lab assistant is worth more than just a paycheck. “If I’m interested in medicine, for instance, it would be a great idea for me to land a place, paid or unpaid, in a professor’s lab,” he says.

Working in a lab can expose students to a wide range of scientific processes and teach them the importance of diligence and attention to detail. More importantly, working as a lab assistant can help students network with professors which can lead to research opportunities. Getting research published alongside a widely respected professor is one of the best things that students in sciences can achieve during their academic careers.

Radio DJ

Its not easy to launch a career in music but if you have your mind made up, then you are going to have to work hard. One of the easiest ways for students to get experience in the music industry is to get involved with their college radio station.

Most college stations have opportunities for first year students to work behind the scenes in operational roles with pathways to more front-facing positions like DJing.

The key to excelling in this position is to take advantage of every chance you get. Your first solo show may be at an awkward time or you may be assigned a genre that isn’t your favorite, but by embracing every opportunity that is thrown your way, you can turn an on-campus job at the college radio station into some serious professional preparation.

Newspaper ad sales

Another way to think about what on-campus job is best for you is to think about what types of skills you want to master. If you are interested in fields like sales or marketing, the school newspaper may offer the perfect job for you.

This job often includes reaching out to local businesses to sell ad space and working with operational teams to create and adjust strategy. Working in ad sales for the newspaper can be an amazing opportunity to get your hands dirty and make real sales. It also can give students the chance to oversee team goals and budgets.

Potential employers want to hear concrete examples of when you have performed a function that is part of a role so if you want to work in sales, you are going to need examples of when you have made sales. The newspaper will give you plenty of opportunities to do just that.

Continue on to read the complete article at cnbc.com

Make the Most of Your National Minority Supplier Development Council (NMSDC) Certification

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Brenda and Carlton Oneal

Brenda H. Oneal and Carlton L. Oneal
Light Speed, LLC

eLearning and multimedia design, development and production

How has the NMSDC helped your business?
The NMSDC has helped our business by providing access to corporate personnel and information about business opportunities that we may not have gotten through any other mechanism.

In many cases, the people with whom I interact through the NMSDC at the National and Regional level are interested in doing business with minority suppliers based upon their knowledge of the responsiveness and innovation that many of our firms provide.

In what unique way did you win your last contract?
The service being provided as a result of the last contract we won is unique. At an NMSDC event, a discussion was being held about how supplier diversity personnel are training the employees in their corporation on the subject of supplier diversity. A client of ours was part of that conversation and recommended that her colleague seeking the service call our firm because we offer a unique eLearning course series on supplier diversity. The courses we provide are designed to teach employees, leaders and other stakeholders the overall business rationale for supplier diversity in addition to many other facts about the subject. Once the person seeking the service talked to two of her other trusted colleagues about the subject and they gave her the same response, “call Light Speed,” she told me she was convinced we were the ones to seek for the information we could provide.

What advice can you give others?
Be very clear on the key products and services you provide. Once you are clear, be certain that you accept requests for work that will keep you in, or very closely tied to what you do extremely well. When companies start to stray from providing anything other than what will result in an excellent client experience, you are putting your reputation at risk.

What is the biggest lesson you have learned?
Develop as many relationships in an organization that you can. As you do this, seek to develop those relationships at different levels in the company. If you depend on a single relationship in a company, years of effort will be lost if that single contact person gets transferred out of the area of chooses to leave their company.

Ronald E. Damper

DAMRON CorporationRonald Damper
Tea supplier to McDonald’s, retail and food service

How has the NMSDC helped your business?    
The NMSDC offers the forum to meet key decision makers and establish mutually beneficial relationships. We have formed lasting relationships with organizations with whom we do business and hope to do business. The networking and referral opportunities are endless.

In what unique way did you win your last contract?
In the past, we experienced difficulty connecting with a particular decision maker. DAMRON exhibited at council trade fair with a booth directly behind the company of interest. This Supplier Diversity person represents an organization that contract feeds many corporations. Our line was long and our aromatic tea wafted in her direction. We shared a cup of tea with her, and she was hooked! We have since been invited, on her behalf, to several company specific vendor fairs and am now supplying organic tea to a major IT corporation with more to follow.

What advice can you give others?
Be impeccable with your word. Deliver what you say you will deliver and always give your best. Become the caliber supplier with whom you would like to do business. Attention to detail is key!

What is the biggest lesson you have learned:
Not right now does not mean no. Stay the course and do not become discouraged.  Continue to stay engaged. Your time is coming.

Learn more about the National Minority Supplier Development Council at nmsdc.org

Kobe Bryant and nine other athletes have been supersmart investors

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“What comes next? What is my next passion?”

Those are the two questions retired NBA star and Academy Award winner Kobe Bryant claims athletes have to ask themselves.

The answer — for Bryant, 40, and many other retired sports stars — is investing.

In mid-August, the news that Bryant’s 2014 investment of $6 million in sports drink BodyArmor had morphed into $200 million after Cola-Cola purchased the company garnered lots of attention. In 2016, the five-time NBA champion partnered with Jeff Stibel, former CEO of Web.com, to form the venture capital fund Bryant Stibel. Other investments under Bryant Stibel include online education platform VIPKid and restaurant booking company Reserve.

Bryant’s return on investment is a boon to the ideology of athletes’ soaring interests in technology investments and beyond. But he’s not the only player who has taken the savvy approach to declaring his or her next passion.

More than 30 years ago, NBA Hall of Famer Earvin “Magic” Johnson, now the president of basketball operations for the Los Angeles Lakers, started Magic Johnson Enterprises and invested in technology staffing company Jopwell. For decades he has maintained ownership in movie theaters, Burger King, TGI Fridays and other franchises, teams and startups.

Miami Marlins CEO Derek Jeter invested in the video conference service Blue Jeans Network and the anti-bullying app StopIt. He also founded sports website The Players’ Tribune. NBA big man and Hall of Famer Shaquille O’Neal sat down with talk show host Ellen DeGeneres in June to discuss investing in Google. O’Neal has also invested in burger chain Five Guys, 24 Hour Fitness and Apple.

Here are nine superjocks who use their brainpower, access and finances to make their money work for them.

Serena Williams

The new mother and tennis champion took interest in the meal delivery service Daily Harvest. During a 2017 episode of talk series Kneading Dough, she also expressed to Maverick Carter some interest in investment properties.

“I have the weirdest one, it’s property,” Serena Williams said. “For me, investments are really important in terms of who are the other investors: What does their portfolio look like? Have they been successful? If they’re a new company, are they a good product? Is it something you believe in? I never do something if I don’t really believe in the product.”

Venus Williams

Venus Williams is an investor in Ellevest, a financial app that empowers women and provides tips on saving.

Kevin Durant

When the Golden State Warriors All-Star found himself leaving Oklahoma City for Silicon Valley, he’d already developed a portfolio that included stakes in delivery service PostmatesAcorns, an investment app geared to millennials; drone company Skydio; and scooter brand LimeBike. Kevin Durant usually prefers to make his investments at the early stages.

Maya Moore

Maya Moore’s desire to promote healthy eating habits encouraged her to become involved with the frozen-juice company Chloe’s Fruit and the plant-based protein meat substitute company Beyond Meat.

“I think from early on in my career, I wanted to be someone who promotes health and wellness and nutrition,” Moore told WCCO4 CBS Minnesota. “These two companies definitely fit all those things.”

Continue onto The Undefeated to read about the complete list of athletes.

10 Reasons to work for the government

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Government Jobs

Now is a good time to work for the United States federal government and USA Jobs, the primary portal for federal job seekers, has launched a streamlined application service for college students and recent graduates called Pathways to better assist them with finding government work.

One might wonder why there is so much interest in government jobs in particular and below you will find 10 good reasons why.

  • 1. Make a difference
    The work of government employees impacts the lives of every American and the lives of people around the world. Federal employees can play a vital role in addressing pressing issues, from homelessness to homeland security. Students interested in working in government can engage in high-impact work, such as helping disrupt the laundering of billions of dollars derived from illicit U.S. drug deals.
  • 2. Great benefits/competitive pay
    Average government salaries are competitive with the private and nonprofit sectors. Recent graduates can expect a starting salary from $32,415 to $42,631 a year. Pay can also increase fairly quickly for top candidates with experience and a strong education. Federal benefits, including health insurance, retirement and vacation, are extremely competitive with, if not superior to, other sectors.
  • 3. The government is hiring
    The Bureau of Labor Statistics projected an employment increase of ten percent through 2018 in federal employment.
  • 4. Location, location, location
    Federal opportunities are not only found in the D.C area. Eighty-four percent of federal government jobs are outside of Washington, D.C. If students are interested in international job opportunities, more than 50,000 federal employees work abroad.
  • 5. Jobs for every major
    Working in the federal government is not just for political science majors. In fact, 28.4 percent of federal employees work in STEM fields. There are federal jobs for every interest and skill, from art history to zoology.
  • 6. Opportunities for advancement and professional development
    Federal employees have many opportunities for career advancement in government. An internal Merit Promotion Program helps ensure that new employees succeeding in their job have easy access to information about job openings within government. The government also offers excellent training and development opportunities and has human resources personnel to help connect current employees with these opportunities.
  • 7. Interesting and challenging work
    Today’s government workers are leading and innovating on issues, such as developing vaccines for deadly diseases, fighting sexual and racial discrimination, and keeping our massive systems of transportation safe.
  • 8. Work-life balance
    Flexible work schedules, including telework, are a major plus for those with busy schedules or long commute. Competitive benefits also include generous vacation time combined with federal holidays and sick leave. All of these packaged together make government an attractive employer for students looking to successfully balance their work and personal lives.

Continue on to read the complete article at ourpublicservice.org/issues/federal-hiring

Netflix creates new executive position focused on inclusion and diversity

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Netflix is creating a new executive position that will focus on inclusion and diversity among employees of the streaming entertainment giant.


Vernā Myers has been appointed to the newly created role of vice president for inclusion strategy, Netflix announced Wednesday. The company said Myers will help devise and implement strategies that integrate cultural diversity, inclusion and equity into all aspects of Netflix’s operations worldwide.

Prior to joining Netflix, Myers worked as a consultant at the Vernā Myers Co., where she advised corporations and organizations on issues including race, ethnicity, gender and sexual orientation.

Her appointment comes two months after Netflix fired its chief communications officer after he used a racial slur on at least two occasions in the workplace. Jonathan Friedland, who had served as Netflix’s top spokesperson for the past seven years, acknowledged that he had spoken in an “insensitive” way.

“Leaders have to be beyond reproach in the example we set and unfortunately I fell short of that standard when I was insensitive in speaking to my team about words that offend in comedy,” he wrote on Twitter in June.

Earlier this week, Los Gatos, Calif.-based Netflix named Rachel Whetstone — a veteran of Facebook, Uber and Google — to succeed Friedland as chief communications officer.

Diversity executives have become increasingly common at major corporations. Silicon Valley in particular has become the focus of media scrutiny for what some workers have described as a lack of gender and racial diversity at technology and internet companies.

Myers has previously consulted for Netflix, the company said. “Having worked closely with Vernā as a consultant on a range of organizational issues, we are thrilled that she has agreed to bring her talents to this new and important role,” said Jessica Neal, Netflix’s chief talent officer.

Continue onto the Los Angles Times to read the complete article.

Tech Has A Huge Diversity Problem. This Woman Is Determined To Fix It.

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Valeisha Butterfield-Jones is a political advisor-turned-tech exec, with a goal to change Google.

“I want to create something that will outlive me,” says Google’s Valeisha Butterfield-Jones. “I want to leave behind a legacy. I’m not sure what it is yet, but I want to build something that can empower a community, and I know it’s going to be centered around women.”

If Butterfield-Jones makes fulfilling sky-high ambitions sound deceptively easy, perhaps it’s because of the heights she has already achieved. A former senior-level Obama campaign consultant, she was hired by Google in 2016 for a newly created position: Global Head of Women and Black Community Engagement.

It’s well-known that tech has a gender and a racial diversity problem. As of 2016, the most recent year for which figures are available, Google’s workforce was only 2% black and 31% female. Butterfield-Jones has been tasked with helping the company better reflect the diverse world it works in. “It’s trying to disrupt the status quo,” she says, with a smile that belies her determination.

Butterfield-Jones grew up in small-town North Carolina. Her parents are both prominent politicians: her father, G.K. Butterfield, is a member of congress, and up until recently was the head of the Congressional Black Caucus. Her mother, Jean Farmer-Butterfield, is a North Carolina state legislator. When Butterfield-Jones was in high school, her father was a judge. “I remember going to public school and seeing some of my friends actually have to go in front of my dad in court,” she says. “It was just this serious, I would say, awakening for me. I realized that if you don’t have the right people in leadership positions, then sometimes the right thing doesn’t always happen.”

When it comes to increasing diversity in tech, Butterfield-Jones thinks the greatest challenge is “decoding what the real barriers to entry are, for people of color and for women.” To that end, as one of her first projects at Google, she organized an event called Decoding Race, which took place at nine of the company’s offices around the world. Van Jones spoke with Google’s chief legal officer David Drummond, and over 15,000 employees took part in facilitated discussions about race, gender, access, and equality. She has also founded a program that connects talented students at historically black colleges and universities with Google internships.

“I’m proud to work for a company that really wants to get it right and figure it out,” Butterfield-Jones says. She thinks tech’s diversity problem is a legacy of the conditions under which the industry’s leading companies were founded. “I really don’t believe that as an industry, it’s coming from a place of hate at all,” she says. “I really don’t. I think these companies were just set up by friends of friends of friends, who hired their friends. They scaled and grew so fast that now we’re trying to fix a problem that started at the core of the foundation.”

Continue onto Harper’s Bazaar to read the complete article.

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