How African-American Olympian ANITA L. DEFRANTZ Helped Change the World

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Anita DeFrantz

LOS ANGELES (October 2, 2017) – Anita L. DeFrantz is a Bronze medal-winning Olympic rower; Attorney; Activist; Vice President of the International Olympic Committee; Multiple Sclerosis fighter;Speaker; and Humanitarian.

She has been a trailblazer as an Olympic athlete, during a time when women – especially women of color – were invisible.

Today, DeFrantz unveils her fascinating life and significant accomplishments in her new book My Olympic Life: A Memoir. Readers will find this modern-day heroine provides a wealth of inspiration and encouragement in these pages, and not just for current and aspiring athletes, women and minorities.

Gloria Steinem said, “Just reading My Olympic Life will make your heart race, your mind expand, and your hopes rise. That’s the kind of life Anita DeFrantz has lived, as a child in an activist family, an Olympic champion fighting for fairness, and a leader challenging limits of race and sex. Everyone needs her story…”

With unwavering tenacity, Anita L. DeFrantz has fought against sexual harassment, helped to change outdated gender verification rules, cracked down on doping, influenced new eligibility requirements, and helped maintain the integrity of the Olympic Movement. She even took on President Jimmy Carter when he tried to use the Olympics as a political forum during the Cold War.

Surely, it is DeFrantz’s boldness, clarity of vision and personal courage that has led this exemplary woman to rise to become the seventh-ranking member in seniority of the International Olympic Committee (IOC). She currently serves on the IOC Executive Board, and as one of the IOC’s four Vice Presidents.

In this riveting book, co-authored with five-time New York Times bestselling author Josh Young, DeFrantz reveals how she emerged from racist threats during her Indiana childhood to exhibiting unwavering leadership and ever-growing influence in Olympic circles to fight sexual harassment and racism, grow women’s Olympic sports, influence new eligibility requirements, change outdated gender verification rules, and more. She even delves into hot-button Olympic issues like doping and political scandals.

Reading My Olympic Life will reveal why DeFrantz has been named one of the “150 Women Who Shake the World” by Newsweek and one of the “101 Most Influential Minorities in Sports” by Sports Illustrated.

Much more than a celebration of advancements in women’s or civil rights, more than a tale of her Olympic victories, My Olympic Life reveals how one motivated, courageous, and passionate person can truly help change the world.

For media inquiries and interview opportunities contact:
Tracy McCormick
310.766.7560 mobile

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Meet the 26-year-old entrepreneur turning high-school gamers into varsity athletes

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With his PlayVS e-sports platform, Delane Parnell is creating a valuable scouting grounds for new tech talent.

Sporting a pair of black Jordan 11 Cap and Gowns that look like they were just unboxed and a dark baseball cap that casts a slight shadow over his baby-cheeked face, Delane Parnell fields questions from the audience at this September’s TechCrunch Disrupt, the annual San Francisco assembly that has become a startup kingmaker of sorts. He shares the stage with Jason Citron, founder and CEO of Discord, a messaging app for video gamers with more than 150 million users, and—after a $50 million fundraising round in April—a valuation of $1.65 billion. Parnell’s PlayVS (pronounced play versus), an e-sports platform for high schools, has yet to even launch. But the 26-year-old Detroit native exudes confidence. “Investors are starting to realize that gaming is the next social paradigm,” says Parnell, answering a question about e-sports’ mainstream popularity. “And they want a piece of it.”

You don’t have to look far for evidence of gaming’s influence. It’s all over YouTube and Twitch in how-to videos and live-streamed sessions of FIFA 19 and Assassin’s Creed. A robust ecosystem of e-sports competitions is rising as well, with game publishers, entertainment companies, and even colleges and universities creating leagues and events for pro gamers and amateurs alike. The largest tournaments, for titles such as Dota 2 and Call of Duty, can fill stadiums and dangle purses of millions of dollars. According to research firm NewZoo, revenue from e-sports-related media, sponsorships, merchandise, tickets, and publisher fees is expected to nearly double from 2014 to reach $1 billion this year. Goldman Sachs projects e-sports viewership to reach 300 million by 2022, putting it on par with the NFL.

For all the organizations rushing into e-sports, a hole remains: high school competitions that engage the estimated 75% of American teens who already play video games. Parnell is filling that void with PlayVS, which lets schools create leagues and host virtual and live competitions. Though he’s diving into an industry full of well-funded sharks, including Amazon (Twitch’s parent company) and Discord, Parnell has an edge. In January, PlayVS signed an exclusive, five-year e-sports partnership with the National Federation of State High School Associations (NFHS), the organization that oversees varsity sports and activities at nearly 19,500 public and private high schools across the country. The first test season of a PlayVS-powered competition, for the popular multiplayer game League of Legends, commenced this October at high schools across five states, and the company is gearing up for its official inaugural season in February.

Parnell is now on a roll. Last week, just five months after PlayVS closed its $15.5 million Series A, the company announced a $30.5 million round from investors that include Adidas, Samsung, Sean “Diddy” Combs, and the VC arm of the Los Angeles Dodgers“I don’t care if you’re gaming on your phone, on a console, or through a cloud service,” Parnell says. “Gaming in high school, even if it’s tic-tac-toe, will run through us.”

If he succeeds, he could effectively control a pipeline that would feed into the burgeoning pro leagues. It took the NBA two decades after its first draft to start recruiting players from high schools, but e-sports leagues are already tapping young talent. A 13-year-old recently signed with a European pro Fortnite team. Given the venture capital and startups flooding into e-sports today, Parnell could create another, equally valuable conduit: one that enables high schoolers—particularly those from disadvantaged backgrounds—to parlay their interest in gaming into lucrative tech jobs. All he has to do is convince schools that e-sports deserves to be taken as seriously as football and basketball.

Continue onto Fast Company to read the complete article.

Tristan Walker announces acquisition by Procter & Gamble, will remain as CEO and move company to Atlanta

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Once a beacon for more minorities to join him in Silicon Valley, the former tech and media darling enters a deal that will help to secure his legacy—and P&G’s.

Procter & Gamble, the consumer packaged goods conglomerate known for such household staples as Tide and Old Spice, will acquire Walker & Company Brands, the health and beauty startup launched by entrepreneur Tristan Walker just five years ago.

While the financial terms of the deal were not disclosed, other details were: Within the first half of 2019, Walker and his current team of 15 employees will relocate to Atlanta—not Cincinnati, the home of P&G headquarters—and will continue working on its brands, Bevel and Form, as a wholly owned subsidiary with Walker at the reins as CEO. He’ll report directly to Alex Keith, president of P&G’s global haircare and beauty business.

“We’ve always had the vision to make health and beauty simple for people of color,” Walker says. “But now we get to accelerate that vision with the many capabilities Procter & Gamble has to offer. I’m not going anywhere. We’re not going anywhere.”

For those who’ve followed the career of Walker, the merger with P&G might read as the conclusion of a storied journey. Walker, who has cultivated for himself an image as a beacon for more racial diversity in Silicon Valley, is one of the most visible African-American executives in tech, counting among his funders Andreessen Horowitz, in addition to cofounding Code2040, a not-for-profit that connects young minorities to coding jobs. While it’s true that he professed his ambitions to become the “Procter and Gamble for people of color” in my profile of him four years ago, he has largely carved that path guided by Silicon Valley sensibilities, from ingratiating himself with the Bay Area elite to employing a direct-to-consumer model for Bevel—Walker’s flagship brand, a suite of shaving products that reduces skin irritation, common among men of color—just as glitzy startups like Warby Parker, Casper Sleep, and Glossier had done.

“Yes, we happen to be in Silicon Valley and, yes, we happen to do things from a technology perspective to help us accelerate our vision, but we’ve always been a forward-looking consumer packaged goods company,” says Walker. “Our moving from Silicon Valley doesn’t change that.”

The truth is, Walker has only in recent years begun eschewing the label of “tech startup.” He turned a few heads at Recode‘s Code Commerce conference in March of last year when he told Kara Swisher, “When I started, I said we’re a tech company. That’s bullshit.”

He’s moved deeper into the CPG world, inking a deal in 2015 to sell Bevel products in Target stores a la carte—a model which came to comprise nearly half the company’s revenue—and last year launched Form, a 10-product haircare line that Walker & Co. recommends to consumers based on an online survey about hair-affecting factors like geography and exercise habits. Form received rave reviews, but Walker lacked the resources to properly promote the product. Meanwhile, competitors such as Harry’s—which bought a $100 million razor factory less than a year after its founding—delivered on the type of fast-growth metrics that venture capitalists crave, zipping to a nine-figure valuation. (Soon Harry’s even installed giant displays that bookended the very Target aisles where Bevel products were sold.)

While some might consider the deal as simply the latest in a string of black-owned health and beauty companies getting snatched up by non-black-owned multinationals—see Sundial Brands’ sale to Unilever last year—the move means that resources like marketing and distribution are unlikely to be a worry for Walker going forward as a subsidiary of P&G, which today has a $93 billion market cap, and which AdAge recently ranked second (to Samsung) in global ad spend.

“When you consider growth percentages and metrics and that sort of thing, while it’s a good signal for the health of the business, it’s not necessarily the greatest signal for one’s belief that you’re building a beloved brand with staying power,” says Walker. “We’re six years old; Procter & Gamble is 180. There’s so much we can learn from them. We haven’t even scratched the surface yet.”

Continue onto Fast Company to read the complete article.

How Gregg Bishop, Small Business Expert, Spends His Sundays

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Commissioner Gregg Bishop

The holidays are always busy for Gregg Bishop, the commissioner of the New York City Department of Small Business Services, which kicks into high gear during the consumer frenzy of December.

Through the rest of the year, however, his agency is focused on providing support, including financing and legal services, to the city’s small businesses. Since Mr. Bishop was appointed in November 2015, he has certified a record number of minority- and women-owned businesses, and expanded the department to better serve immigrant entrepreneurs. He is also an adjunct professor at Baruch College’s Marxe School of Public and International Affairs and board president of the Red Hook Initiative, a community nonprofit. Mr. Bishop, 43, lives in a one-bedroom apartment in Downtown Brooklyn.

PREDAWN SOCIAL I’m an early riser, and Sunday is my catch-up day. So when I get up, typically at 5 or 5:30, I start sending work emails that I didn’t respond to during the week. I also do social media for my fraternity, Alpha Phi Alpha — I just got initiated into the Alpha Gamma Lambda chapter, based in Harlem, this spring — and for Red Hook Initiative. I’m an info junkie, so I’ll watch TV news while I’m doing that.

HOLY MOTHER I have to be at church by 11, so I’ll start getting ready for that around 10:15. My church, New Life Church of God, just celebrated its 25th anniversary. It started in my mom’s house in East Flatbush, so I grew up in it. My mom, Evette Williams, wasn’t the one who had the idea to start it, but she was part of the team that got it going. Now she’s one of the pastors. The building it’s in used to be an auto-repair shop. I’m very big into fitness, but Sunday is my cheat day, so I might stop at Golden Krust for ackee and saltfish, a Jamaican dish. Or I may just skip breakfast. It depends on how early I leave for church.

SPREAD THE WORD There’s a commercial corridor right near church, so on the way I’ll stop and hand out fliers and knock on doors to let people know about our services. Things like health fairs, connecting people with jobs. A lot of people don’t think to turn to the government for assistance. Any time I’m walking down an avenue, I’m thinking, “What can we do as an agency to help these particular businesses? How can we advocate for them?”

TECHIE IN THE PEWS My background is in technology, and that comes out in church. I flip between being the person who does the sound engineering and the person who does the software displays, so people can see the hymns and Bible verses.

BARBERSHOP After church it’s like clockwork. I go get my hair cut at First Impression Barber and Beauty Salon, which is in what we call the Junction, basically where Flatbush and Nostrand Avenue meet. I actually have lost my hair, it’s thinning, but I refuse to be like those folks who try to hang onto it. So I cut it really low. I’ve been going there almost all my life, since high school, and they’ve seen me grow up. If I want to check the pulse of how we’re doing as a government, the barbershop is my best source. I just sit down and listen to the conversation.

Continue on to The New York Times to read the complete article.

How Diversity Officers Change Corporate Culture

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Professional Woman

By 2045, people of color will make up the majority of the U.S. population.

That demographic shift, predicted by the U.S. Census Bureau, is one reason why companies are starting to take workplace diversity, inclusion and equity more seriously.

In corporate America, this has manifested in part through the proliferation of chief diversity officers, who are charged with creating policies and climates supportive of workers from an array of backgrounds.

As of 2012, 60 percent of Fortune 500 companies had diversity executives, according to the Wall Street Journal.

“It’s becoming standard across companies,” says Allison Scott, chief research officer at the Kapor Center, which aims to increase diversity in the technology and entrepreneurship sectors. “I think that’s a promising and important sign.”

However, having a chief diversity officer on the payroll is not a panacea, researchers say.

“That all sounds good and well, but in the past there wasn’t as much accountability for it,” says Kisha Jones, assistant professor of psychology at Pennsylvania State University. “You could get an A for effort for attempting the different practices but not have to show how change happens.”

Still, the presence of a diversity executive in the C-suite is one sign job seekers should look for when assessing whether a company is equipped to hire and retain diverse workers and effectively market to the heterogeneous customer base of the future.

Learn more about what these officers do and other signs to look for when evaluating a company’s commitment to diversity.

Duties and Conditions for Success

The work of diversity officers, also known as equal opportunity professionals, cuts across departmental boundaries. They influence hiring, training and company cultural practices that relate to three “big buckets,” explains Archie Ervin, vice president and chief diversity officer at the Georgia Institute of Technology and president of the National Association of Diversity Officers in Higher Education.

Continue on to US News to read the complete article.

4 Key Steps to Launching a New Career

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Statistics show that the average employee will change jobs at least 11 times in their working life and, for most people, moving into a new role is a fairly manageable transition. But what happens when you change course completely and launch a brand-new career?

Laurence Favier had spent more than 30 years in senior corporate IT roles when she decided it was time for an entirely new vocation. “As retirement approached, I knew it was time for a more fulfilling career. Something that would nurture me as I transitioned into retirement,” Laurence explains.

Drawing upon her decades of executive experience, Laurence is committed to becoming a business and career mentor and Joy of Business company facilitator. But even with her highly relevant background and extensive corporate knowledge, she felt the anxiety that comes with stepping into the unknown.

“Career change brings great fear – particularly the fear of being without a job. But fear is not something to avoid and you can’t let it hold you back from your dreams,” Laurence advises. Workforce experts estimate that every modern worker will make a complete career change at least once in their life. If you are looking to move in an entirely different career direction, Laurence offers the following advice.

  1. Prepare yourself for change

“When you start actively looking for change, you will begin to see and create opportunities. It may be a conversation with an old friend, or an advertisement that suddenly catches your eye – when you are committed to your new career, you will notice possibilities when they present themselves. Also, don’t hesitate to talk openly about your plans and your needs. You may be surprised how willing others are to help you.

  1. Engage Human Resources

“If you work in a large company, it’s quite easy to change careers simply by moving from one department to another. Human Resources teams often identify employees who have the right skills, attitude and willingness to move into a new career, so don’t hesitate to talk about your desires with your manager or HR representative.”

  1. Network, Network, Network

“If you don’t have the opportunities of a large company, all you need is a great network. Make connections with the people you meet – clients, competitors, suppliers, co-workers. All of these people will know you, appreciate your skills and attributes, and trust you. Speak to your network about your career desires and help them, where you can, to obtain theirs.”

  1. Use Social Media

“Social media is a great way to express your desire for a career change and get the advice and assistance you need. Let your personal connections know what your plans are, but also use social media sites such as LinkedIn and Facebook to reach out to professionals who can help you in your new endeavor.”

Importantly, Laurence says “Don’t wait for things to be perfect before taking the leap into a new career. Be confident, ask for help and resources when you need them, but don’t hesitate. And don’t listen to the nay-sayers around you – they will often judge you for the things they’re not capable of doing. In the end, I have found, they will admire you.”

Source: accessjoyofbusiness.com

Aaron I. Bruce Named Vice President and Chief Diversity Officer of ArtCenter College of Design

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Aaron Bruce posing for camera

November 27, 2018, Pasadena, Calif. – ArtCenter College of Design President Lorne M. Buchman announced today that, after a comprehensive international search, the College has named Aaron I. Bruce to the new inaugural role of vice president and chief diversity officer.

With more than 20 years of experience leading initiatives focused on campus diversity, inclusion and international engagement, Bruce will officially begin his tenure at ArtCenter on December 3, 2018, and will lead the establishment of a new Center for Diversity, Equity and Inclusion in Art and Design.

Since 2008, Bruce has served as the chief diversity officer at San Diego State University where he led the implementation of that University’s diversity strategic plan.

“His achievements in curricular redesign, recruitment, retention, marketing and global community programming are all deeply impressive,” said Buchman. “His passion for art and design, together with his extensive record of research and program development in areas of diversity, equity and inclusion, make him an ideal candidate for the job.”

“I’m excited to join such a stellar team of creative giants,” said Bruce. “ArtCenter represents the intersection of some of the most innovative art and design spaces in the world. The journey towards adopting inclusive art and design strategies provides us with the power to collectively change human expression in ways we cannot fully imagine.”

Bruce holds a PhD from the University of Rhode Island and a Masters of International Business Administration from United States International University (Alliant).

As envisioned, the Center for Diversity, Equity and Inclusion in Art and Design will involve students, alumni, faculty and staff, as well as external communities, in robust research, exhibitions, symposia, lectures and curricular expansion on issues of diversity, equity, and inclusion (DEI) in art and design. The proposed Center for DEI will create and support collaborative and transformative activities in the service of the College’s values of DEI that are designed to break new ground through practice, scholarship and pedagogy. In addition, the Center will serve as a partner to ensure that DEI programs, practices and policies for faculty, staff and students are aligned with the College’s strategic plan, values and mission.

“Harnessing creative energy to develop positive change globally is just one of the many characteristics that attract me to ArtCenter. Research shows that embracing the unique identities and lived experiences of artists and designers helps industries achieve higher levels of performance,” said Bruce. “I envision the Center for Diversity, Equity and Inclusion in Art and Design to be a nucleus, where the combined energy of our community helps us thrive. The goal is to build a flexible learning space where diverse research, pedagogy and creative expression is explored. A space where all perspectives are valued, and new skills will be adopted. The end game is to prepare students to be successful creative leaders in a highly diverse and globalized workforce.”

About ArtCenter College of Design

Founded in 1930 and located in Pasadena, California, ArtCenter College of Design is a global leader in art and design education. ArtCenter offers 11 undergraduate and seven graduate degrees in a wide variety of industrial design disciplines as well as visual and applied arts. In addition to its top-ranked academic programs, the College also serves members of the Greater Los Angeles region through a highly regarded series of year-round continuing education programs for all ages and levels of experience. Renowned for both its ties to industry and its social impact initiatives, ArtCenter is the first design school to receive the United Nations’ Non-Governmental Organization (NGO) status. Throughout the College’s long and storied history, ArtCenter alumni have had a profound impact on popular culture, the way we live and important issues in our society.

How This Interior Designer Turned Paint Into Profit

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Suburban Detroit may not be the epicenter of interior design, but that’s exactly where Nicole Gibbons, the CEO and founder of Clare, a direct-to-consumer paint line, got her start.

When she was growing up, Gibbons’ mother was a decorator and although Gibbons’ first job out of college was Director of Public Relations for a mass market retailer, she launched a design blog as her creative outlet. “It was truly just a place for me to talk about all the things I loved,” said Gibbons.

For a decade, her nights and weekends were spent pursuing her side hustle: designing for clients. But in 2008 the recession hit, and it wasn’t a good time to leave her day job to take a risk on starting her own full-time business. By 2013, the economy was looking up, though, and inspired by the Martha Stewart model of bringing design to the masses, Gibbons decided to take the leap.

Her first step was to build up her interior design clientele in and around New York City. Simultaneously, Gibbons started positioning herself as a design influencer. She appeared on Rachael Ray, HGTV, and spent three seasons on Home Made Simple on the Oprah Network. “All the while I was thinking about what kind of business I could build,” she added.

By then the first wave of direct-to-consumer brands had launched, with companies like Warby Parker in 2010 and Casper in 2014. “That’s when I had a light bulb moment around paint,” she said. “It’s something that’s really painful to shop for.” So painful in fact that it took one of Gibbons’ friends two months to pick a paint color that she ended up hating in the end.

Gibbons started out by networking in the paint industry to learn as much as she could about the marketing and manufacturing of paint. In the process she learned that the paint industry hasn’t changed the way it operates or sells its products in over a century. One woman she spoke with, who worked in the paint research and development space, even admitted that she hated shopping for paint. “That was a huge vote of confidence that I was onto something,” Gibbons explained. “People kept telling me that they wished someone would figure this out.”

And that’s exactly what Gibbons set out to do when she launched Clare.

Her first goal was to create a shopping experience for paint that was a lot more inspiring than the aisles of your local hardware or big box store, where a single paint brand has more than 3,000 colors to choose from.

The typical journey for someone who wants to paint their house is this: Narrow down from thousands of colors to a handful you want to try on your wall. Buy an eight-ounce jar of paint. Go home. Paint your wall. Wait for paint to dry. All the colors look almost exactly the same. Go back to the store and test more colors until you find the right one. Wait in line to get the paint mixed. If you have a job, which many of us do, you’re probably at the store on the weekend when it’s the busiest. Next you head over to the tool aisle, which is just as confusing as the paint aisle.

Instead, Clare has only 55 of the best colors in the best finishes, Gibbons explained. No more going back and forth to the store each time you want to try a new color. The company offers peel and stick color built with a high-tech color matching system that takes into account how much natural light your space gets, your existing furniture, and the colors you already have in the room. It also eliminates the need for testing multiple paint swatches on your wall.“We’ve created a suite of high quality tools so that even an unskilled painter can achieve high quality results. We bundle together everything from paint to tools. And we also have tons of online content that offer tips and inspiration,” said Gibbons.

In 2017 Gibbons built out the business, focusing on supply chain logistics and market research. “My goal was to get the business to the place where I could raise capital,” she said.

Her first step was to talk to people who had raised capital before. “I didn’t have a physical product or any traction so I had a bigger challenge than most,” Gibbons said. “When you’re raising pre-product you have to sell a vision. You can’t just have a compelling story. You have to give investors the confidence that you can execute on your vision.”

When Gibbons first pitched Clare to investors, she already knew who her suppliers would be and she had all the relationships in place in order to execute. “I spent all year working on it. I ate, breathed and slept paint. When the time came to talk to investors, I had a really clear path forward and a clear plan.”

Gibbons took her first investor meetings in September 2017 and by the end of October she had an oversubscribed round, raising $2 million, exceeding her initial target of $1.6 million.

Continue onto Forbes to read the complete article.

Discover the Career Opportunity of a Lifetime in Insurance

LinkedIn

No matter what you want to accomplish or experience in life, chances are an insurance career offers the ideal path for you to pursue your goals and passions.

The insurance industry employs more than 2.8 million people in various roles, including art historians, data scientists, drone pilots, marketers, M&A specialists, and of course, actuaries—who ranked their jobs in recent polling as “the best job in the world.” No matter your educational background, or your interests—music, cars, advertising or finance—an insurance career is your gateway to a lifelong opportunity to learn and serve.

And now is an ideal time to explore the many career options insurance offers. Insurance is making huge investments in its future as a leading innovator of practical advancements in Artificial Intelligence (AI), big data, telemetricsm and other emerging technologies. But perhaps our biggest investment is to find the right people. Over the next decade, hundreds of thousands of insurance industry jobs will be available to individuals like you; people who want to embrace and drive discoveries that power insurance’s primary mission: to make communities safer, more resilient, and more productive. And after a loss, to rebuild lives, households and businesses.

There may be thousands of different occupations in insurance, but only one career matters.

Source: Insurance Information Institute

How to Answer “So, Tell Me About Yourself”

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Professional Black Man Standing Outside the Office

So, the first question you’re probably going to get in an interview is, “Tell me about yourself.” This is not an invitation to recite your entire life story or even to go bullet by bullet through your resume.

Instead, it’s probably your first and best chance to pitch the hiring manager on why you’re the right one for the job.

A formula The Editor at The Muse likes is called the Present-Past-Future formula. So, first you start with the present—where you are right now. Then, segue into the past—a little bit about the experiences you’ve had and the skills you gained at the previous position. Finally, finish with the future—why you are really excited for this particular opportunity.

Below is an example:

If someone asked, “tell me about yourself,” you could say:

“Well, I’m currently an account executive at Smith, where I handle our top performing client. Before that, I worked at an agency where I was on three different major national healthcare brands. And while I really enjoyed the work that I did, I’d love the chance to dig in much deeper with one specific healthcare company, which is why I’m so excited about this opportunity with Metro Health Center.”

Remember throughout your answer to focus on the experiences and skills that are going to be most relevant for the hiring manager when they’re thinking about this particular position and this company. And ultimately, don’t be afraid to relax a little bit, tell stories and anecdotes—the hiring manager already has your resume, so they also want to know a little more about you.

Continue on to The Muse to read the complete article.

MBE Smart Tips: Pitch Perfect

LinkedIn
Businesswoman at her desk with paper looking at camera

Sixty seconds isn’t much time to make a business pitch, but often, that’s all you have. Whether it’s at a networking event, a conference or another event, you’ll want to have a one-minute pitch ready.

How can you make a good impression and convey your company’s message so it will lead to a follow-up meeting? Here are a few tips:

1 Practice and prepare. The more familiar and comfortable you are with your pitch, the more effective you’ll be. Put together a few talking points and rehearse them over and over again.

2 Focus on the basics. You want your pitch to be high-level, which means to be concise and leave the details out. In addition to describing your company’s programs and services, talk about the value you bring and how you’re different from competitors.

3 Show passion. People are attracted to others who love what they do, so be positive and enthusiastic. You’ll command their attention and they’ll likely have greater confidence in your abilities.

4 Be yourself. You want to be genuine; don’t try and be someone you’re not. Mislead them now and you won’t have another chance to get in the door.

5 Prepare for questions. Anticipate what questions will be asked after your one-minute pitch and be ready to respond. The way you respond to questions is as important as your pitch.

6 Be realistic. A one-minute pitch will not necessarily lead to a business opportunity. Use the opportunity to learn if there is enough interest to further the conversation, then follow up.

7 Call to action. After your pitch and any questions, follow up by asking if there would be an opportunity to talk in more detail to discuss your company’s offerings.

Practice your pitch at other networking events. If you’re prepared, a one-minute pitch can make a favorable impression and lead to new business ventures.

Source: SCMSDC

24 Amazing Companies Hiring Right Now

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diverse businesspeople

It’s November, which means it’s the perfect time of the year to reflect on all of the things you’re grateful for. If your job isn’t quite making the cut? Well, it might be time to look for a new gig that reignites your passion.

You’re in luck—because there are plenty of awesome opportunities out there. Check out the 24 companies  pulled together on this list, and prepare to feel a whole new sense of gratitude for your career.

1). GlaxoSmithKline dedicates itself to creating a healthier population the whole world over by researching and developing a broad range of innovative products in pharmaceutical, vaccine, and consumer healthcare arenas. The company boasts commercial operations in more than 150 countries, as well as 89 manufacturing sites and R&D centers in the U.K., U.S., Belgium, and China.

At GSK, you’ll never feel like another cog in a wheel. Employees are encouraged to speak up and seek new experiences—because the company wants to build a workforce of ambitious, assertive leaders. It accomplishes this by offering a multitude of learning and training opportunities beyond existing roles and peer shadowing options at GSK global job sites to make sure its people get ahead and find the right career paths.

2). E*TRADE—a financial services organization—pioneered the online brokerage industry by executing the first-ever electronic individual investor trade. Since then, the company has continued to challenge conventions and put customers first. Today, ETRADE advocates for all investors through its powerful technology and professional guidance.

Made up of a team that’s driven to make things better, E*TRADE is an enterprising company that moves quickly. A “get-it-done” attitude permeates the office culture, as the company values integrity, transparency, and winning over bureaucracy. The hands-on environment makes it easy for employees to continuously build relationships, share new ideas, ask questions, and effect change.

3). Hearst Magazines, a division of Hearst, is the largest U.S. publisher of monthly magazines. With 25 dynamic, industry-leading titles including Esquire, Cosmopolitan, Harper’s BAZAAR, ELLE, Men’s Health, Women’s Health, Good Housekeeping, HGTV Magazine, and O, The Oprah Magazine, Hearst Magazines reaches nearly 137 million readers and site visitors each month—more than two-thirds of all woman and millennial women in the country. The company publishes close to 300 editions and 200 websites around the world. Hearst Magazines Digital Media reaches nearly 100 million site visitors each month and more than 240 million social media followers through its 25 digital brands. Its portfolio also includes Sweet, a collaboration with Snapchat on its Discover platform.

At Hearst, collaboration is key, with those in leadership roles regularly mentoring junior staff while striving to create an atmosphere where sharing ideas and solutions is not only encouraged but expected. Teams work together with the common goal of creating the best media brands they possibly can—engaging, entertaining, informative, and thoroughly inventive.

4). Banfield Pet Hospital, founded as a veterinary practice in 1955, a subsidiary of the Mars corporation, has grown to nearly 1000 hospitals in 42 states, as well as DC and Puerto Rico. Together with its clients—and the millions of pets treated each year—Banfield is working to shape the future of veterinary medicine.

Managers at Banfield work as guiding factors when it comes to leading their teams. They work with their staff to outline what issues need to be solved—but how those solutions are accomplished is left to the discretion of team members. Banfield believes that having faith in associates motivates them to take ownership and deliver excellence.

Continue on to The Muse to read the complete article.

Is a Sustainability Career on Your Green Horizon?

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In addition to being vital to many people, protecting the environment has become an important goal for many organizations.

A way to achieve this goal is to pursue sustainability, which is using resources to meet present needs without compromising future resources. Although sustainability most often is associated with environmental protection and conservation, it also has social and economic impacts. In fact, many companies adopt sustainability strategies to increase profits, and the environmental aspects become an added bonus.

Sustainability professionals help organizations achieve their goals by ensuring that their business practices are economically, socially, and environmentally sustainable. Sustainability is a diverse field that includes a wide variety of professionals. Sustainability professionals can be business managers, scientists, or engineers; or they can come from other backgrounds. Although their specific career paths might differ, sustainability professionals promote environmental protection, social responsibility, and profitability.

 

What is sustainability?

The most common definition of sustainability comes from a 1987 United Nations (UN) conference. In a report, the UN defined sustainable development as “development that meets the needs of the present without compromising the ability of future generations to meet their own needs.”

Alternately, according to a report from the National Association for Environmental Management, sustainability is “a term that describes a company’s strategies for acting as a responsible corporate citizen, ensuring its operations are financially sustainable and minimizing its environmental footprint. Sustainability initiatives may include natural resource reduction, supply chain management, worker safety and health initiatives, stakeholder engagement and external reporting.” External reporting involves reporting information on a company’s environmental and safety record to the general public, or to government agencies.

The environmental aspect of sustainability focuses on the goals of protecting the environment and the conservation of natural resources. To accomplish these goals, sustainability professionals help organizations, such as businesses, government agencies, and non-profits implement policies to manage the resources consumed and the waste generated by an organization. For example, a sustainability professional might suggest that an organization reduce the amount of packaging it uses when it ships its products, and a reduction in packaging could help the company decrease the amount of raw material it consumes and as the environmental cost of shipping products. Less material used in packaging would cut down on materials cost, as well as weight and space taken up during transport. Since the products would take up less space, there would be fewer shipments. Fewer shipments mean less energy used for shipping products, as well as lower emissions. For example, fewer shipments made by trucks would reduce fuel consumption and lower the amount of exhaust emitted into the air.

To fulfill sustainability’s social aspect, sustainability professionals attempt to minimize the negative effects and to promote the positive effects of the organization’s activities on stakeholders. Stakeholders are persons or groups, such as employees, customers, and citizens of surrounding communities, who have an interest in the organization and its activities. Sustainability professionals work to ensure that the workplace is healthy for employees and that the products or services the organization provides are safe for consumers to use. Some sustainability initiatives affect more than one stakeholder. Many companies promote corporate responsibility where they will provide pro bono products and services to the needy, or make attempts to lessen their environmental impact. For example, although many companies are required by law to keep emissions below a certain level, a sustainability professional might help a utility company lower its smokestack emissions to an even lower level than required. This additional reduction would benefit the health of workers and local citizens, as well as provide the company with positive publicity to entice new customers and retain current ones.

Sustainability can affect current and future profitability. Whether they work for private corporations, government agencies, or non-profits, sustainability professionals strive to ensure that the costs of implementing a sustainability program are worth the expected benefits. Because organizations would not knowingly implement sustainability policies that could cause them to become financially unsound, sustainability professionals help a company’s leaders understand the benefits of implementing such techniques, by explaining future cost savings. For example, energy-saving techniques, such as installing motion detectors and changing light bulbs require an upfront investment but result in future savings.

 

Sustainability issues facing companies today

Many organizations are implementing sustainability measures for a variety of reasons. Sustainability allows companies to increase profits, to manage risks, and to engage stakeholders, such as employees, the local community, and shareholders. By pursuing sustainability, many organizations are able to run more efficiently, improve corporate reputations, retain employees, and have a more positive impact on their communities. In addition, there are other benefits to practicing sustainability. These include minimizing the effects of rising costs for energy; complying with increased regulations at the federal, state, and local levels; and pleasing customers who expect organizations to be environmentally and socially responsible.

Prices for oil, natural gas, coal, and other energy sources have been volatile over the past several decades. Most prices have been on an upward trend with significant fluctuations. Experts believe that U.S. energy prices will continue to climb, because of a limited supply of energy sources (due to a wide range of factors) and increased demand from other countries, particularly China.

Increasing costs have led many firms to seek ways to cut back on the amount of energy used in everyday operations. Companies have been finding new ways to do more with less. This includes reducing the amount of energy used for production and other operations, in addition to finding alternative sources of energy. Alternatives include wind, solar, and biofuels (fuels derived from renewable sources, such as corn, grass, or algae).

Federal and state governments have been enacting climate change regulations. The U. S. Environmental Protection Agency has recently been granted the authority to regulate greenhouse gas emissions, and many states have enacted legislation to limit carbon emissions with the goal of reducing their carbon output. Companies in these states will be under increasing pressure to reduce their carbon footprint (the amount of carbon a company releases into the atmosphere) or face increased regulation and possible fines for their emissions.

Consumers are increasingly paying attention to companies’ environmental records. Consumers base decisions on products or services to purchase at least partially on environmental factors. Companies that have a positive environmental record can appeal to these environmentally sensitive consumers. In addition to consumers, many environmentally conscious businesses and other organizations prefer to work with, or purchase, goods or services from organizations that also are conscious of the environment. Thus, by implementing sustainability measures, companies will be able to appeal to more customers.

Concerns about corporate impact on the environment and local and global communities are being incorporated into strategic business decisions. Sustainability is becoming part of how companies do business in the United States, rather than being viewed as a cost.

 

Who are sustainability professionals?

A job in sustainability encompasses the concept of stewardship—the responsible management of resources. Sustainability professionals seek to improve an organization’s environmental, social, and economic impact. Some have specific titles such as sustainability manager and director of corporate responsibility. Sustainability professionals in other roles may have had experience as industrial managers, logistics (transportation, storage, and distribution) managers, environmental scientists, civil engineers, or recycling coordinators, among others. Many of these workers are dedicated to sustainability, but some may have sustainability responsibilities, in addition to their primary job duties. These workers might implement corporate recycling programs, install equipment to increase efficiency, and monitor processes to ensure their proper function.

There is no set career path for jobs in sustainability—jobs have varying responsibilities across different organizations. For many organizations, sustainability is ingrained in their cultures and is the responsibility of many employees. Thus, these organizations may not have dedicated sustainability staff, but still pursue sustainability.

Many large corporations, some non-profit organizations, and some government agencies employ sustainability professionals. Some organizations do not employ their own sustainability professionals, but still seek advice on sustainability practices. Such organizations frequently hire consultants from sustainability firms to offer specialized skills and services, as well as additional temporary manpower for specific projects.

The Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS) currently does not have data on the number of workers involved in sustainability activities. However, data on employment related to the use of environmentally friendly technologies and practices are available from the Green Technologies and Practices survey. Although many different workers may be involved in carrying out day-to-day sustainability operations, the BLS definition of a green job involved in green technologies and practices is one whose primary duty is related to the use of environmentally friendly production processes. Workers must spend more than half their time involved in researching, developing, maintaining, installing and/or using technologies or practices to lessen the environmental impact of their establishment, or in training other workers in these technologies and practices to be considered in a green job.

 

Management occupations

Sustainability managers come from diverse backgrounds, have different job titles, and perform a broad range of duties. Sustainability managers are responsible for developing and implementing an organization’s sustainability plans and presenting these plans to senior staff. They might also be responsible for ensuring that an organization is in compliance with environmental, health, and safety regulations. Many sustainability managers rely on their public relations and communications skills to work with concerned citizens in local communities.

 

Science occupations

Scientists who work in sustainability devise technical solutions for reducing waste and cutting costs. They assist in the development of strategies to increase safety and to reduce the risk of illness and injury for a company’s employees. Some scientists often serve as advisors to sustainability managers and are involved in performing research to minimize a company’s environmental impact. Many sustainability scientists also serve as consultants, working as technical experts at firms that specialize in providing sustainability services to companies that do not have their own sustainability staff, or those who need specialized knowledge to implement sustainability strategies. Many people with a science background move into management positions and become top-level decision makers in the business community. They use their technical knowledge to guide an organization toward more sustainable practices and are frequently promoted to top-level management positions.

Occupations in scientific research and development have become increasingly interdisciplinary, and as a result, it is common for biological scientists, chemists, materials scientists, and engineers to work together as part of a team. Most scientists work in an office or laboratory and also spend some time in manufacturing facilities with engineers and other specialists. Some scientists, such as environmental scientists or conservation scientists spend a large portion of their time working outdoors, studying the natural environment.

If the growth of sustainability continues, more organizations will employ sustainability professionals. The benefits of this growth should be noticeable in many sectors of U.S. industries, from services, such as finance and health care, to manufacturing and construction.

Sustainability professionals have a broad range of education and experience levels, mainly in science, engineering, and business management. Although many of the occupations with sustainability responsibilities require at least a bachelor’s degree, there are opportunities for individuals with a wide variety of work experience and knowledge.

As sustainability becomes more widespread, new opportunities to contribute to the field will arise. A new market focused on sustainability should build job prospects for more future workers.

 

Source: bls.gov/green/sustainability

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