National Society of Black Engineers and Boeing to Host ‘Hidden Figures’ Event at Stanford University

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Discussion and Mixer Will Continue NSBE’s #BlackSTEMLikeMe Campaign, Spotlighting African Americans’ Contributions to Science, Technology, Engineering and Math

Leveraging the immense popularity of the hit movie “Hidden Figures,” the National Society of Black Engineers (NSBE) and The Boeing Company will present a “Hidden Figures Mixer and Power Panel Discussion” at Stanford University’s CEMEX Auditorium, 655 Knight Way, Stanford, Calif., on Friday, Feb. 3, 2017, 6:30–9:30 p.m. Tony Prophet, chief equality officer for Salesforce.com, will be the keynote speaker. The by-invitation-only event is part of NSBE’s nationwide campaign titled #BlackSTEMLikeMe. This unique multimedia initiative is aiming to encourage black students and professionals in science, technology, engineering and math (STEM) to share their stories and passions; bring visibility to the important work they are doing; show black boys and girls that a future in STEM is an incredible and attainable career path; demonstrate the value of NSBE membership and celebrate the unique, wonderful and life-changing aspects of the African-American community — past and present. The campaign is designed to move NSBE toward the main goal of its 10-year strategic plan, which is to lead the U.S. to produce 10,000 African-American bachelor’s degree recipients in engineering annually by 2025, up from 3,501 graduates in 2014.

“Hidden Figures,” released in theaters nationwide on Jan. 6, tells the story of how three African-American women — Katherine Johnson, Dorothy Vaughan and Mary Jackson — contributed critical math, engineering and computer science work to the early missions of the U.S. space program. The movie has received great reviews and was the No. 1 film at the box office in its first two weekends.

The #BlackSTEMLikeMe panel discussion at Stanford will maintain the focus that “Hidden Figures” has brought to the often overlooked contributions of the black STEM community. Confirmed panelists include Prophet; “Hidden Figures” cast member Karan Kendrick; Regina Wallace-Jones, former chief security operations officer for Facebook; Lakecia Gunter, chief of staff for Intel Corporation CEO Brian Krzanich; and Nia Jetter, technical fellow, The Boeing Company. The panel discussion will begin at 7:45 p.m.

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#BlackSTEMLikeMe also provides many avenues for STEM students and professionals to participate in the campaign through social media:

  • By sharing STEM stories on Twitter, Facebook, Instagram, Snapchat or via the nsbe.org website using the #BlackSTEMLikeMe hashtag. The best stories will be entered in NSBE’s national social media webisode series;
  • By tweeting STEM stories, including visuals, using the #BlackSTEMLikeMe hashtag;
  • By posting STEM stories to personal Facebook pages, tagging the NSBE Facebook page using the #BlackSTEMLikeMe hashtag;
  • By posting STEM photos or videos to Instagram, tagging @NSBE and using the #BlackSTEMLikeMe hashtag; and
  • By emailing text and video for blog posts to BlackSTEMLikeMe@nsbe.org for posting on the nsbe.org website.

A list of the #BlackSTEMLikeMe sponsors follows. Learn more about the #BlackSTEMLikeMe campaign, including upcoming events and other ways to get involved, at BlackSTEMLikeMe.nsbe.org.

About NSBE

With 278 chapters and nearly 16,000 active members in the U.S. and abroad, the National Society of Black Engineers (NSBE) is one of the largest student-governed organizations based in the United States. NSBE, founded in 1975, supports and promotes the aspirations of collegiate and pre-collegiate students and technical professionals in engineering and technology. NSBE’s mission is “to increase the number of culturally responsible black engineers who excel academically, succeed professionally and positively impact the community.” For more information, visit www.nsbe.org.

Sign up to follow NSBE on social media.

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Read about NSBE’s “Be 1 of 10,000” Campaign at Graduate10K.NSBE.org.

Alpha Kappa Alpha Sorority Successfully Raises $1 Million in Support of HBCUs

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Alpha Kappa Alpha Sorority, Incorporated is proud to announce that for the second consecutive year, the sorority has successfully raised $1 million for the benefit of Historically Black Colleges and Universities (HBCUs) as part of its HBCU Impact Day initiative.

On Monday, September 16, local chapters, private donors and corporate matching dollars from across the globe helped the 111-year old service organization reach the $1 million fundraising goal.

“Once again this is a historic moment for Alpha Kappa Alpha, as we have raised $1 million for HBCUs for the second year in a row,” AKA International President Glenda Glover shared with excitement in a video message to sorority members.

“I want to thank everyone who contributed to this $1 million, one-day campaign. Let’s continue to support our HBCUs.”

“HBCUs are critically important educational institutions. Alpha Kappa Alpha was founded at an HBCU more than 100 years ago, so it is not only befitting but necessary that AKA women are at the forefront of investing in the future of these spaces,” added Dr. Glover, who is also president of Tennessee State University, and an HBCU graduate.

In February 2019, AKA gifted $1.6 million to the first 32 of 96 HBCUs through the AKA-HBCU Endowment Fund. The second cycle, consisting of 32 more HBCUs, will be funded in 2020. The endowment fund falls under the organization’s target HBCU for Life: A Call to Action, which aims to promote HBCUs by encouraging students to attend and matriculate through these institutions.

HBCU Impact Day is one component of a four-year $10 million fundraising goal set by AKA International President Dr. Glenda Glover, who challenged the women of AKA to lead the charge in helping to secure fiscal sustainability and success for all four-year accredited HBCUs around the country.

Although HBCU Impact Day has passed, individuals or organizations interested in supporting the effort can still make contributions by texting AKAHBCU to 44321, giving by mail or online at aka1908.com/hbcus/donate-hbcu. Money raised through AKA’s HBCU campaign will assist in providing financial support to these schools over the next three years. Endowment funds can help schools reduce student debt through scholarships, fund industry-specific research, recruit and retain top faculty, and much more.

For more information on the sorority’s commitment to HBCUs, visit AKA’s online pressroom at www.AKA1908.com/news-events/.

About Alpha Kappa Alpha Sorority, Incorporated®
Alpha Kappa Alpha Sorority, Incorporated (AKA) is an international service organization that was founded on the campus of Howard University in Washington, D.C. in 1908. It is the oldest Greek-letter organization established by African-American college-educated women. Alpha Kappa Alpha is comprised of nearly 300,000 members in more than 1,000 graduate and undergraduate chapters in the United States, the U.S. Virgin Islands, Liberia, the Bahamas, Bermuda, the Caribbean, Canada, Japan, Germany, South Korea, South Africa, and in the Middle East.  Led by International President Glenda Glover, PhD., Alpha Kappa Alpha Sorority is often hailed as “America’s premier Greek-letter organization for African-American women.” For more information on Alpha Kappa Alpha Sorority and its programs, log onto AKA1908.com.

National Black MBA Association’s 41st Annual Conference & Exposition Coming September 24-28

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NBMBAA 2019 Conference

NBMBAA’s 41st Annual Conference & Exposition is the premier conference for today’s black professionals.

The Annual NBMBAA Conference & Exposition convenes members, corporate and university partners, and some of the world’s most sought after thought leaders at the George R. Brown Convention Center for a week of exploration in the areas of education, leadership, career opportunities, and networking connections that enable professional development.

More than 10,000 professionals will travel to Houston September 24-28 to gain access to opportunities that only this national conference can offer. Will you be one of them?

The National Black MBA Association mission is to help promote educational and economic enrichment to students and professionals. The 41st Annual NBMBAA Conference and Exposition hosted in Houston, Texas will focus on the power that each member possesses to control their professional destiny through focused planning and preparation.

The conference tracks will be aligned to address leadership competencies needed to accomplish career goals and objectives. In addition, workshops and breakout sessions will provide key insights and learnings aligned with challenges that members are experiencing in corporate America.

Each member will leave the 41st Annual NBMBAA® Conference and Exposition empowered to lead the planning and execution of a powerful future and equipped to succeed by garnering powerful tips, tools and resources. Don’t miss the opportunity to attend one of the most powerful NBMBAA conferences yet!

For more information, visit nbmbaa.org/conference/ .

40th College Television Awards Submission Period Begins Sept. 5

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College Television Awards logo

The Television Academy Foundation Awards Ceremony Celebrates Student-Produced Programs From Colleges Nationwide. The submission period for the Television Academy Foundation’s 40th College Television Awards is Sept. 5 through Oct. 3, 2019.

Each year hundreds of graduate and undergraduate students, representing colleges and universities nationwide, submit their media projects to television’s most prestigious student competition—the Television Academy Foundation’s College Television Awards.

The College Television Awards honors achievement in student-produced programs and will feature stars from today’s top television shows presenting awards to winners at the red-carpet awards ceremony.

Emulating the Emmy® Awards selection process, entries for the College Television Awards are judged by Television Academy members. Top honors and a $3,000 cash prize will be presented to winning teams in eight categories: drama, comedy, animation, nonfiction, promotional, news, sports and variety. The College Television Awards also includes two additional, donor-supported, categories: the Seymour Bricker Humanitarian Award and the Loreen Arbus Focus on Disability Scholarship.

In addition to the awards ceremony, the nominees will take part in a three-day television summit hosted by the Television Academy Foundation. The summit, designed to enhance professional development, will feature panel discussions, studio tours and networking opportunities with industry executives and Academy members.

The College Television Awards often serves as an entry point for a career in television for nominees and winners. Past alumni have worked as editors, writers, producers and other positions on programs including Ray Donovan, The Handmaid’s Tale, Tom Clancy’s Jack Ryan, CBS This Morning, Unbreakable Kimmy Schmidt, Grey’s Anatomy, 60 Minutes, Empire and many more.

For additional information, visit TelevisionAcademy.com/CTA.

To read the complete article continue on to The Patch.

These Toni Morrison Books Topped Barack Obama’s Summer Reading List

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Toni Morrison with Barack Obama smiling and laughing together

Former President Barack Obama released his annual summer reading list and the late Toni Morrison featured prominently in his recommendations.

“It’s August, so I wanted to let you know about a few books I’ve been reading this summer, in case you’re looking for some suggestions,” he said in the Facebook Post.

“To start, you can’t go wrong by reading or re-reading the collected works of Toni Morrison. Beloved, Song of Solomon, The Bluest Eye, Sula, everything else — they’re transcendent, all of them.”

The Nobel laureate died Aug. 5 after a brief illness, her family announced.

“It is with profound sadness we share that, following a short illness, our adored mother and grandmother, Toni Morrison, passed away peacefully last night surrounded by family and friends,” her family said in a statement shared by USA Today. “She was an extremely devoted mother, grandmother and aunt who reveled in being with her family and friends. The consummate writer who treasured the written word, whether her own, her students or others, she read voraciously and was most at home when writing. Although her passing represents a tremendous loss, we are grateful she had a long, well-lived life.”

After Morrison’s death, Obama shared a remembrance on social media. “Toni Morrison was a national treasure,” he wrote. “Her writing was not just beautiful but meaningful — a challenge to our conscience and a call to greater empathy. She was as good a storyteller, as captivating, in person as she was on the page.”

In 2012, he awarded Morrison the Presidential Medal of Freedom, one of the two highest honors the U.S. government presents to civilians.

Continue on to Essence to read the complete article.

Atlanta HS Students Make History At Harvard’s International Debate Tournament By Securing Second Championship

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Atlanta high school debate team dressed in suits and red bow tiesstudents

Two high-school students led their all-Black debate team to their second consecutive championship at Harvard’s international debate tournament. The two boys also set an unprecedented and undefeated record at the tournament.

According to a press release issued by The Art Department, each member on the team is from Atlanta. Despite having no prior experience in debating, team members DJ Roman and Keith Harris beat competitors from 15 different countries around the world.

“This is the moment that we’ve worked so hard for,” said Roman. “Our accomplishment is far bigger than us; we are showing the world what black youth are capable of achieving when given equal access, exposure, and opportunities.

This win is for our ancestors, our city, and most of all our culture.”

The students have been able to receive debate training as a part of the Harvard Diversity Project, which Blavity has previously profiled.

For the past 10 months, the students have been training on weekends under Brandon P. Fleming, Harvard’s assistant debate coach.

“Knowing that they will compete against hundreds of scholars who have years of debate experience combined with the benefit of private and prep schools to their advantage, we seek to level the playing field by introducing our students to higher level academic disciplines that are typically unavailable in traditional school settings,” said Fleming.

Atlanta High School debate team poses on the steps of a Harvard school building

Continue on to Blavity to read the complete article.

Kamala Harris Proposes Plan To Invest $60 Billion In Historically Black Colleges

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Kamala Harris speaking at podium

Sen. Kamala Harris (D-Calif.) rolled out two policy plans Friday morning aimed at closing the wealth gap for black Americans. Harris said in a press release that if elected president, she will invest $60 billion in historically black colleges and universities and $12 billion in black-owned businesses and entrepreneurship. She said she would also invest $2.5 billion in programs that train black teachers ― an addition to her March proposal to raise teachers’ salaries.

The presidential hopeful, a graduate of HBCU Howard University, described the proposal as “the next major planks in her Black agenda,” according to her campaign’s fact sheet.

Of the $60 billion she plans to invest in HBCUs and other minority-serving institutions, Harris said she would put $10 billion toward school infrastructure to build classrooms, school labs and other facilities. The other $50 billion would be used to create a competitive fund at the Department of Education to support science, technology, engineering and math education at HBCUs. The competitive fund would go toward scholarships, fellowships and research.

The $12 billion policy proposal would be allocated to federal contracting programs that would help black business owners create businesses from the ground up.

“We can create a pipeline for ensuring that Black Americans are leading the research and entrepreneurship to grow our innovation economy and participate in the wealth it generates,” the campaign fact sheet states.

Continue on to the Huffington Post to read the complete article.

Toni Morrison, Towering Novelist of the Black Experience, Dies at 88

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Toni Morrison recieves medal of freedom award

Toni Morrison, the Nobel laureate in literature whose best-selling work explored black identity in America — and in particular the often crushing experience of black women — through luminous, incantatory prose resembling that of no other writer in English, died on Monday in the Bronx. She was 88.

Her death, at Montefiore Medical Center, was announced by her publisher, Alfred A. Knopf. A spokeswoman said the cause was complications of pneumonia. Ms. Morrison lived in Grand View-on-Hudson, N.Y.

The first African-American woman to win the Nobel Prize in Literature, in 1993, Ms. Morrison was the author of 11 novels as well as children’s books and essay collections. Among them were celebrated works like “Song of Solomon,” which received the National Book Critics Circle Award in 1977, and “Beloved,” which won the Pulitzer Prize in 1988.

Ms. Morrison was one of the rare American authors whose books were both critical and commercial successes. Her novels appeared regularly on the New York Times best-seller list, were featured multiple times on Oprah Winfrey’s television book club and were the subject of myriad critical studies. A longtime faculty member at Princeton, Ms. Morrison lectured widely and was seen often on television.

Continue on to the New York Times to read the complete article.

Google announces literary activities to help kids evaluate and analyze media as they browse the Internet

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Mom and daughter looking at a tablet together

Google is pleased to announce the addition of 6 new media literacy activities to the 2019 edition of Be Internet Awesome. Designed to help kids analyze and evaluate media as they navigate the Internet, the new lessons address educators’ growing interest in teaching media literacy.

They were developed in collaboration with Anne Collier, executive director of The Net Safety Collaborative, and Faith Rogow, PhD, co-author of The Teacher’s Guide to Media Literacy and a co-founder of the National Association for Media Literacy Education. Because media literacy is essential to safety and citizenship in the digital age, the news lessons complement Be Internet Awesome ’s digital safety and citizenship topics.

Overview of new activities:
1. Share with Care: That’s not what I meant!
● Overview: Students will learn the importance of asking the question: “How might others interpret what I share?” They’ll learn to read visual cues people use to communicate information about themselves and to draw conclusions about others.

2. Share with Care: Frame it
● Overview: Students will learn to see themselves as media creators. They’ll understand that media makers make choices about what to show and what to keep outside the frame. They’ll apply the concept of framing to understand the difference between what to make visible and public online and what to keep “invisible.”

3. Don’t Fall for Fake: Is that really true?
● Overview: Students will learn how to apply critical thinking to discern between what’s credible and non-credible in the many kinds of media they run into online.

4. Don’t Fall for Fake: Spotting disinformation online
● Overview: Students will learn how to look for and analyze clues to what is and isn’t reliable information online.

5. It’s Cool to Be Kind: How words can change a picture
● Overview: Students will learn to make meaning from the combination of pictures and words and will understand how a caption can change what we think a picture is communicating. They will gain an appreciation for the power of their own words, especially when combined with pictures they post.

6. When in Doubt, Talk It Out: What does it mean to be brave?
● Overview: Students will think about what it means to be brave online and IRL, where they got their ideas about “brave” and how media affect their thinking about it.

Expanding resources to families
YMCA
We teamed up with the YMCA across six cities to host bilingual workshops for parents to help teach families about online safety and digital citizenship with Be Internet Awesome and help families create healthy digital habits with the Family Link app. The workshops, designed for parents, coincide with June’s National Internet Safety Month and come at the start of the school summer holidays.

Continue on here to read more.

Meet the 16-year-old Texan who will be attending SMU’s law school this fall

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Haley Taylor Schlitz,stands outside in a summery dress and her arms folded with a big smile on her face

A 16-year-old Texan recently shared her journey from home school to law school. Haley Taylor Schlitz, who graduated from high school at 13, is preparing to attend Southern Methodist University’s Dedman School of Law this fall, one of nine schools that accepted her, according to the American Bar Association.

“I think the entire educational experience has really helped me grow and learn who I am better,” Haley said. “A lot of people find that out about themselves a little bit later in life. My education has really helped me get to know who Haley is.”

Teen phenom Haley Taylor Schlitz,16, who graduated from high school at 13, is preparing to attend Southern Methodist University’s Dedman School of Law this fall, one of nine schools that accepted her, according to the American Bar Association. The Keller, Texas teenager had an accelerated education following her graduation from home schooling in 2013. She since attended Tarrant County College and then Texas Woman’s University.

Haley was home-schooled after her parents withdrew her from public school in the fifth grade because they didn’t like the way she was being taught.

After high school, she began taking classes at Tarrant County College and started at Texas Woman’s University in 2017, according to her website.

“Home-schooling helped me go at my own pace and thrive on my own terms,” Haley said. “I was able to skip what I knew and do what’s at my intellectual level.”

Haley was accepted to law schools at Howard University, the University of Arkansas at Little Rock and Texas Southern University, among others, but ultimately chose SMU, according to Texas Lawyer.
An author at 16

After their own experience, Haley and her mother, Dr. Myiesha Taylor, decided to write a guide to home schooling for black parents in America.

The Homeschool Alternative, which published in January, teaches families about the home schooling mindset, its benefits, what it requires and how to begin, according to the book’s website.

“I feel like there are a lot of students who can do what I did,” Haley said. “Obviously it’s not impossible because I did it, and I’m not a super genius. I work very hard, but I’m not out of reach.”
Mom on TV

In 2013, Haley’s mother, an emergency physician, was so inspired by the children’s show Doc McStuffins that she sent Disney Channel a collage of herself and other female doctors of color to thank them.

The show portrays a young black girl nicknamed Doc who treats her toys as patients.

Disney responded by casting her in a live-action segment. Months later, they also named a character on the show after her — Myiesha McStuffins.

Taylor told the Dallas Morning News in 2013 that it was “an unbelievable honor.”

“My kids identify with the Doc character so it’s surreal that Doc’s mother has my name. I feel like it’s full circle,” she said. “I started off as a little girl like Doc McStuffins and I grew up and became her mother, a doctor with children who are aspiring to be doctors, too.”
Far-reaching goals

Haley initially wanted to go into medicine like her mother but now wants to become an attorney and advocate for gifted students from traditionally neglected communities. She has spoken out against systemic racism in American public schools.

“It is my hope that I can bring my passion for addressing education equity issues, and help facilitate a program that focuses on the legal advocacy needs of underserved students and their families in accessing gifted education programs,” she wrote in a 2018 Medium article. “The lack of access to these programs helps promote stereotypes and keeps students of color in our K-12 schools locked in an education system that views them as the problem instead of the solution.”

After she graduates from SMU, Haley hopes to practice law and become a judge. She said she also wants to open her own business, an organization similar to a school that would allow students to “thrive as themselves.”

One of her goals is to increase the opportunities for gifted and talented girls and students of color.

“I really want to help students realize their potential even if they can’t home-school,” Haley said. “I want to help families open their eyes to the opportunities that they don’t even realize are there.”

Haley knows her path isn’t typical.

“I understand that although my ’16’ is not the 16 most envision in their life, my version allows me to engage in the areas I deeply care about and advocate for a fully just and equal society,” she wrote in the Medium article. “I love my version of ’16,’ and look forward to immersing myself in the study of law.”

Continue on to Dallas News to read the complete article.

Here’s One of the Nation’s Most Diverse HBCUs

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Diverse college tudents standing in a row

Kentucky State University (KSU) President M. Christopher Brown II announced that Kentucky State is one of the most diverse institutions among Historically Black Colleges and Universities (HBCUs) in the nation. In 2018, KSU was also a multi-award winner at HBCU Digest’s HBCU Awards.

President Brown said KSU has nearly 50 percent African-American students and 50 percent non-black students. Additionally, the university has nearly 50 percent African-American employees and 50 percent non-black employees.

“It is rare for an institution to be at the midpoint—50 percent mark on all matrices. There are schools that spend millions of dollars trying to get to that middle point,” President Brown said. “They spend a lot of money on enrollment management, diversity planning, and strategic recruitment trying to achieve this level of diversity that indicates maximal engagement.”

President Brown added that KSU is a prime laboratory for every intellectual possibility in the country.

The research was conducted by Kentucky State’s Office of Institutional Research and Effectiveness using data from the Integrated Postsecondary Education Data System (IPEDS). The percentage of students was based on the total fall 2015 enrollment, which included undergraduate, graduate, full-, and part-time students. The percentage of employees was based on the total fall 2015 employees, which included faculty, staff, full- and part-time employees.

President Brown said KSU will continue to strive for inclusive excellence and noted that people from different backgrounds working together produces results that make everyone better and can have direct impacts on student achievement and workforce development.

Working together, learning about differences and similarities, results in better, more comprehensive solutions, he said.

Source: kysu.edu

How Concierge Parenting Services Can Help Prepare Kids for College

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student with exam paper and pencil taking a test

College admissions issues has been stealing the headlines. From the college admission scandal, where wealthy people allegedly paid to help their kids get accepted to high ranking colleges, to the talk of adding diversity scores to help boost some SAT/ACT tests, the news is filled with the challenges that those wanting to go to a good college may face.

Some parents are opting to take an approach that is more tailored to helping the child become prepared to excel and get into the college of their choice. This new approach, called concierge parenting services, aims to provide a customized plan to take the child to the next level, by identifying their fullest potential and capitalizing on it.

“Too often, the approaches taken in schools are failing students. Every child learns differently, so a cookie cutter approach just doesn’t work,” explains Reena B. Patel, a parenting expert, licensed educational psychologist, and author, who offers virtual workshops. “Through concierge parenting services, parents can learn exactly what their child needs to focus on in order to excel. The plan has been tailored to their unique child.”

Recently, Gallup suggested that education in the country takes the opposite approach of standardized tests, which students are being inundated with around the nation. What they suggest is that students need a test that is for them and about them, so that they become better at understanding and developing their own unique talents, which will help them succeed in school and life. This is the goal of concierge parenting, too.

Concierge parenting is service offered by Patel and other professionals in the field, in which they conduct extensive assessment on the child. Here are some of the ways that concierge parenting services can help prepare kids for college:

  • The assessments that are conducted show a child’s strengths, so that they can capitalize on them in order to reach their goals.
  • Parents receive a customized learning profile of their child, which will give insight as to how they best learn and optimize their strengths while developing areas of need. Parents can use that information to ensure that their educational needs are being addressed and how to take their child to the next level of growth.
  • Their learning profile includes such things as the child’s emotional resilience. This is important information, because it sheds light on how well the child will adapt to stressful situations or challenges. They can use the information to help the child learn more coping skills.
  • Parents receive the tools that they need in order to help their child navigate studying, taking tests, and applying for colleges. Rather than guessing how to best go about these things, the information has been tailored to the needs and styles of the individual.
  • Similar to a concierge in a hotel, parents get a tailored approach that is focused on meeting their needs and ensuring their child’s success. By taking advantage of a service like this, parents can learn their child’s strengths then nurture them and focus on excelling those strengths to be the best version of themselves.

“If you want to feel confident about your child’s education and future college acceptance, you can’t go wrong with taking a concierge parenting approach,” added Patel. “The purpose of concierge parenting is to help remove the stress, hurdles, and disappointment that may come later on. It helps your child to set out on their path with a detailed map to help them successfully get there.”

Patel offers several concierge parenting services packages, including being able to tailor a program to meet individual needs and goals. Two of her popular packages are titled Optimal Learning and New Parent. The Optimal Learning package offers a comprehensive assessment, customized report with specific tools to apply, follow up emails to ask questions, comprehensive evaluations to include, but not limited to, intelligence testing, academic testing, social and emotional readiness, and executive functioning testing. The New Parent package focuses on the idea that every baby and child is unique and has a different temperament. It’s ideal for new parents or a parent of a teen. Finding time to address challenges, such as behaviors, or how best to get your baby to sleep is hard. Wouldn’t it be nice to have a service customized just for your family and child? One that is effective and developed by a professional expert.

Each concierge parenting package includes initial consultation to identify concerns and goals, three session observation, modeling, and implementation of expert techniques, and one follow up virtual call after strategies are implemented.

In addition to offering concierge parenting services, Patel is the founder of AutiZm& More. As a licensed educational psychologist and guidance counselor, she helps children and their families with the use of positive behavior support strategies across home, school, and community settings. She does workshops around California, and virtual workshops globally where she provides this information to health professionals, families, and educators. She is also the author of a book that helps children with anxiety coping strategies called “Winnie & Her Worries,” and author of a book about autism awareness and acceptance, called “My Friend Max: A Story about a Friend with Autism.” Both of her books are available on Amazon. To learn more about her services, visit the website at reenabpatel.com.

About Reena B. Patel
Based in the San Diego area, Reena B. Patel (LEP, BCBA) is a renowned parenting expert, guidance counselor, licensed educational psychologist, and board-certified behavior analyst. For more than 20 years, Patel has had the privilege of working with families and children, supporting all aspects of education and positive wellness. She works extensively with developing children as well as children with exceptional needs, supporting their academic, behavioral and social development. She was recently nominated for San Diego Magazine’s “Woman of the Year.” To learn more about her books and services, visit the website at reenabpatel.com, and to get more parenting tips, follow her on Instagram @reenabpatel.

Gallup. It’s time to try the opposite of standardized testing. gallup.com/education/237284

$2 Million Awarded to Historically Black Colleges and Universities

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Sudents graduating university waving

The U.S. Department of Commerce’s Minority Business Development Agency (MBDA), is announcing grant awards of nearly $2 million to four Historically Black Colleges and Universities (HBCUs).

In June 2018, MBDA invited HBCUs to propose projects that will achieve one or more of the following objectives: increase their ability to compete for and receive Federal research and development funds; establish partnerships with Federal laboratories and other technology resources; increase Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics (STEM) entrepreneurship; and compete for Federal contracts.

“Historically Black Colleges and Universities served as the catalyst to creating the black middle class in America and will continue to be the incubator for minority business talent, innovation, and leadership. These important schools generate billions in economic impact annually and are engines for job creation in their local economies across the United States,” said MBDA National Director Henry Childs II. “These grant awards will provide seed money for these institutions to pursue innovative projects and to build more revenue-generating infrastructures to better serve our nation’s future entrepreneurs and workforce.”

The HBCUs that received grant awards include:

  • Clark Atlanta University ($499,497) to develop a STEM entrepreneurship curriculum that increases student interest in the innovation economy at three Atlanta University Center Consortium campuses.
  • Howard University ($359,891) to design a technical support model for 11 HBCUs in the mid-Atlantic region to compete for Federal research and development funds and leverage partnerships with Federal laboratories.
  • South Carolina State University ($404,992) to launch regional training sessions for HBCUs to compete for Federal research and development funds.
  • Tougaloo College ($695,412) to establish a partnership among multiple HBCUs, private companies, federal labs, and research institutions to increase capacity for HBCUs to participate in federal research and contracting opportunities.

These programs are part of the 2018 MBDA Broad Agency Announcement, a new initiative. More than $13 million was awarded for 35 projects focused on Department of Commerce and MBDA priorities from resources that increase disaster preparedness and relief to programs that increase access to capital.

 

Source: Minority Business Development Agency (MBDA)

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