The Association for the Study of African American Life and History (ASALH) Wraps Up its 101st Annual Conference

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By Roy Betts

The Association for the Study of African American Life and History (ASALH), the founders of Black History Month, convened its 101st Annual Conference in Richmond, VA, Oct. 5-9.

More than 1,000 registrants, with more than 200 sessions, an amazing film festival, and tours of historic Richmond sites led to one of ASALH’s most successful annual conferences in recent memory.

Highly acclaimed speakers, including writer and social critic Ta-Nehisi Coates, Black Entertainment Television (BET) commentator and syndicated journalist Jeff Johnson, SNCC civil rights pioneer Courtland Cox, and social justice lawyer Bryan Stevenson, headlined the conference.

This year’s conference theme was, “Hallowed Ground: Sites of African American Memories,” which served as the 2016 national Black History Month Theme. ASALH’s 2016 theme also honored the centennial of the National Park Service, which hosted a special plenary session that opened the conference. The plenary called attention to the role of the NPS in preserving and fostering greater knowledge of African American historic sites.

Ta-Nehisi Coates

“The Richmond conference was amazing. I couldn’t imagine a city more appropriate to host the first conference in ASALH’s second century,” said ASALH National President Dr. Evelyn Brooks Higginbotham.  “The city graciously opened its doors and more than 1,000 educators, historians, students, and Black History enthusiasts of all ages and ethnicities came to be a part of history. Indeed, Richmond was a huge success.”

Dr. Higginbotham delivered the Carter G. Woodson luncheon keynote speech reflecting upon Richmond as the place where her own grandparents and great grandparents lived, worked and worshipped as slaves, and where they ultimately won their freedom. She spoke of her great grandfather, James H. Holmes, who in 1867 became the first Black pastor of First African Baptist Church, the city’s oldest African American congregation, which organized specifically for slaves and free blacks in 1841.

Special receptions were hosted by the University of Richmond and the Virginia Museum of Fine Arts.

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Dr. Evelyn Higginbotham

Awards were announced at the conference to recognize outstanding contributors to the continuing legacy of Dr. Carter G. Woodson, ASALH’s founder and the Father of Black History. A number of individuals were honored for their work in making Black History relevant, resourceful, and robust.

Dr. La Vonne I. Neal, Associate Vice-President for Process Improvement and Operational Effectiveness at Northern Illinois University and co-editor of the Black History Bulletin, received the Mary McLeod Bethune Award for her record of accomplishments as an educator, leader, athlete, and businesswoman.

Lois L. Watson, retired educator and community leader, also received the Mary McLeod Bethune Award. In 1996, she and 16 members chartered the Manasota, FL, Branch of ASALH, which is now the largest branch in the United States.

Wilma King, Arvarh E. Strickland Distinguished Professor in African American History and Culture Emerita, University of Missouri, was the recipient of the coveted Carter G. Woodson Scholars Medallion for her published works on slavery and freedom in 19th century North America.

Dorothy F. Bailey, vice-chair of the Prince George’s County Planning Board of The Maryland-National Capital Park and Planning Commission, received the Executive Council Award for Special Recognition. Bailey serves as president of ASALH’s Truth Branch in Prince George’s County, Maryland. She serves on the ASALH Executive Council. She is the founder of the Kiamsha Youth Empowerment Program that conducts youth workshops during ASALH’s national meetings.

“This was the best ASALH conference ever,” said a participant. “I believe next year’s conference in Cincinnati will be even better.”

National Society of Black Engineers Launches #BlackSTEMLikeMe Campaign

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Social Media Initiative Spotlights African Americans’ Contributions to Science, Technology, Engineering and Math

Leveraging the immense popularity of the hit movie “Hidden Figures,” the National Society of Black Engineers (NSBE) has launched a nationwide campaign titled #BlackSTEMLikeMe. This unique multimedia initiative is aiming to encourage black students and professionals in science, technology, engineering and math (STEM) to share their stories and passions; bring visibility to the important work they are doing; show black boys and girls that a future in STEM is an incredible and attainable career path; demonstrate the value of NSBE membership and celebrate the unique, wonderful and life-changing aspects of the African-American community — past and present. The campaign is designed to move NSBE toward the main goal of its 10-year strategic plan, which is to lead the U.S. to produce 10,000 African-American bachelor’s degree recipients in engineering annually by 2025, up from 3,501 graduates in 2014.

“Hidden Figures,” released in theaters nationwide on Jan. 6, tells the story of how three African-American women — Katherine Johnson, Dorothy Vaughan and Mary Jackson — contributed critical math, engineering and computer science work to the early missions of the U.S. space program. The movie, which is getting great reviews and was the No. 1 film at the box office in its first two weekends, is bringing a major focus to the often overlooked contributions of the black STEM community.

“NSBE is very excited about this campaign, which makes a conscious effort to highlight black men and women in STEM and show young black boys and girls that this is a career path that it’s cool for them to pursue,” said NSBE National Secretary Racheida Lewis. “Being a member of NSBE has enabled me and many other black students to successfully complete engineering and other STEM-related degree programs. And it has empowered me to pursue my passion of educating others about STEM through initiatives such as #BlackSTEMLikeMe.”

Trina Fletcher is director of Pre-College Programs for NSBE and a Ph.D. candidate in engineering education at Purdue University. Like Lewis, she places high value on presenting positive STEM role models and mentors to African-American youth.

“Without my STEM education and professional career opportunities, I would not be the leader and woman that I am today,” Fletcher said. “As a member of NSBE and now full-time employee of the organization, I’ve been able to see the impact we have on people of color, ranging from K–12 students

to professionals on their way to retirement from their companies. I encourage all black parents and caregivers to take advantage of the opportunity to expose their children to STEM through #BlackSTEMLikeMe as well as NSBE youth programs such as our Pre-College Initiative and the Summer Engineering Experience for Kids (SEEK).”

#BlackSTEMLikeME provides many avenues for STEM students and professionals to participate in the campaign through social media:

  • By sharing STEM stories on Twitter, Facebook, Instagram, Snapchat or via the nsbe.org website using the #BlackSTEMLikeMe hashtag. The best stories will be entered in NSBE’s national social media webisode series;
  • By tweeting STEM stories, including visuals, using the #BlackSTEMLikeMe hashtag;
  • By posting STEM stories to personal Facebook pages, tagging the NSBE Facebook page using the #BlackSTEMLikeMe hashtag;
  • By posting STEM photos or videos to Instagram, tagging @NSBE and using the #BlackSTEMLikeMe hashtag; and
  • By emailing text and video for blog posts to BlackSTEMLikeMe@nsbe.org for posting on the nsbe.org website.

“This campaign proves, once again, the power of good partnerships: combining NSBE members’ grassroots activism and dedication to our mission with the resources of other socially progressive organizations,” said NSBE Executive Director Karl W. Reid, Ed.D. “We thank our #BlackSTEMLikeMe sponsors for making this effort possible.”

A list of the #BlackSTEMLikeMe sponsors follows. Learn more about the #BlackSTEMLikeMe campaign, including upcoming events and other ways to get involved, at BlackSTEMLikeMe.nsbe.org.

About NSBE

With 278 chapters and nearly 16,000 active members in the U.S. and abroad, the National Society of Black Engineers (NSBE) is one of the largest student-governed organizations based in the United States. NSBE, founded in 1975, supports and promotes the aspirations of collegiate and pre-collegiate students and technical professionals in engineering and technology. NSBE’s mission is “to increase the number of culturally responsible black engineers who excel academically, succeed professionally and positively impact the community.” For more information, visit www.nsbe.org.

Sign up to follow NSBE on social media.

Twitter

Facebook

Instagram

LinkedIn

YouTube

Read about NSBE’s “Be 1 of 10,000” Campaign at Graduate10K.NSBE.org.

National Society of Black Engineers and Boeing to Host ‘Hidden Figures’ Event at Stanford University

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Discussion and Mixer Will Continue NSBE’s #BlackSTEMLikeMe Campaign, Spotlighting African Americans’ Contributions to Science, Technology, Engineering and Math

Leveraging the immense popularity of the hit movie “Hidden Figures,” the National Society of Black Engineers (NSBE) and The Boeing Company will present a “Hidden Figures Mixer and Power Panel Discussion” at Stanford University’s CEMEX Auditorium, 655 Knight Way, Stanford, Calif., on Friday, Feb. 3, 2017, 6:30–9:30 p.m. Tony Prophet, chief equality officer for Salesforce.com, will be the keynote speaker. The by-invitation-only event is part of NSBE’s nationwide campaign titled #BlackSTEMLikeMe. This unique multimedia initiative is aiming to encourage black students and professionals in science, technology, engineering and math (STEM) to share their stories and passions; bring visibility to the important work they are doing; show black boys and girls that a future in STEM is an incredible and attainable career path; demonstrate the value of NSBE membership and celebrate the unique, wonderful and life-changing aspects of the African-American community — past and present. The campaign is designed to move NSBE toward the main goal of its 10-year strategic plan, which is to lead the U.S. to produce 10,000 African-American bachelor’s degree recipients in engineering annually by 2025, up from 3,501 graduates in 2014.

“Hidden Figures,” released in theaters nationwide on Jan. 6, tells the story of how three African-American women — Katherine Johnson, Dorothy Vaughan and Mary Jackson — contributed critical math, engineering and computer science work to the early missions of the U.S. space program. The movie has received great reviews and was the No. 1 film at the box office in its first two weekends.

The #BlackSTEMLikeMe panel discussion at Stanford will maintain the focus that “Hidden Figures” has brought to the often overlooked contributions of the black STEM community. Confirmed panelists include Prophet; “Hidden Figures” cast member Karan Kendrick; Regina Wallace-Jones, former chief security operations officer for Facebook; Lakecia Gunter, chief of staff for Intel Corporation CEO Brian Krzanich; and Nia Jetter, technical fellow, The Boeing Company. The panel discussion will begin at 7:45 p.m.

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#BlackSTEMLikeMe also provides many avenues for STEM students and professionals to participate in the campaign through social media:

  • By sharing STEM stories on Twitter, Facebook, Instagram, Snapchat or via the nsbe.org website using the #BlackSTEMLikeMe hashtag. The best stories will be entered in NSBE’s national social media webisode series;
  • By tweeting STEM stories, including visuals, using the #BlackSTEMLikeMe hashtag;
  • By posting STEM stories to personal Facebook pages, tagging the NSBE Facebook page using the #BlackSTEMLikeMe hashtag;
  • By posting STEM photos or videos to Instagram, tagging @NSBE and using the #BlackSTEMLikeMe hashtag; and
  • By emailing text and video for blog posts to BlackSTEMLikeMe@nsbe.org for posting on the nsbe.org website.

A list of the #BlackSTEMLikeMe sponsors follows. Learn more about the #BlackSTEMLikeMe campaign, including upcoming events and other ways to get involved, at BlackSTEMLikeMe.nsbe.org.

About NSBE

With 278 chapters and nearly 16,000 active members in the U.S. and abroad, the National Society of Black Engineers (NSBE) is one of the largest student-governed organizations based in the United States. NSBE, founded in 1975, supports and promotes the aspirations of collegiate and pre-collegiate students and technical professionals in engineering and technology. NSBE’s mission is “to increase the number of culturally responsible black engineers who excel academically, succeed professionally and positively impact the community.” For more information, visit www.nsbe.org.

Sign up to follow NSBE on social media.

Twitter

Facebook

Instagram

LinkedIn

YouTube

Read about NSBE’s “Be 1 of 10,000” Campaign at Graduate10K.NSBE.org.

Two weeks left to register for the 2017 DEI!

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Use a Carrot, Not a Stick

Did you know?  As a recognition-focused, non-punitive tool, the DEI is a carrot, not a stick.  Companies that receive an 80 or above are deemed DEI top-scoring companies.  Companies that receive below an 80 are kept confidential.

The DEI is #MoreThanAScore.  It’s about learning.  There are learning opportunities for all, regardless of score.

There’s less than 2 weeks left to register for the 2017 DEI!  Registration closes on January 13, 2017.  Don’t wait – register now on the DEI website.  Questions? Contact Jani Willis.

The DEI is a joint initiative of the USBLN and AAPD.

Click here to participate in the 2017 Disability Equality Index!

Registration for the USBLN 20th Annual National Conference & Biz2Biz is now open!

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USBLN is excited to announce that registration is now open for our 20th Annual National Conference & Biz2Biz Expo entitled, “Disability: A Catalyst for Innovation.” USBLN is excited to announce that registration is now open for our 20th Annual National Conference & Biz2Biz Expo entitled, “Disability: A Catalyst for Innovation.” The conference will be held at the JW Marriott Orlando Grande Lakes August 21-24, 2017.

The USBLN is the only business-to-business national membership organization, with local affiliates, that focuses on sharing and developing proven strategies for including people with disabilities in the workplace, supply chain and marketplace.

This premier event provides the best and brightest in disability inclusion with cutting-edge educational sessions, enhanced networking, exciting interactive programming plus high-profile speakers. We look forward to seeing you in Orlando!

Registration

This premier event provides the best and brightest in disability inclusion with cutting-edge educational sessions, enhanced networking, exciting interactive programming plus high-profile speakers.Pre-registration is required.
Click here to register now!

Sponsors

Want to see which companies are truly leading the way by taking a role in a workforce, marketplace and supply chain inclusion of people with disabilities around the world?

Click here to see our sponsors.

Hotel Information

Book your stay at the JW Marriott Orlando Grande Lakes.

Accessible guest rooms have 32 inch wide opening. Registration desk, meeting spaces, restaurants and lounges are all accessible. Service animals allowed.

Click here to book your room!

Agenda

Can’t decide if you want to attend all or some of the conference meetings?

Coming Soon!

NOBLE Announces the 2017 William R. Bracey Winter CEO Symposium!

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On behalf of the National Organization of Black Law Enforcement Executives (NOBLE) National President Perry Tarrant, our Executive Board, local chapters, and members, you are invited to attend our annual William R. Bracey Winter CEO Symposium. The symposium is scheduled for February 16-18, 2017, at the Westin Seattle in Seattle, WA. 

The upcoming CEO Symposium is an international gathering of over 300 law enforcement CEOs that represent cities and communities across the nation and world. The symposium will showcase leading Law Enforcement Executives at the federal, state, and local levels. The symposium focuses on Executive Leadership Training.

Please remember to REGISTER EARLY to ensure that you do not miss this outstanding training event. Should you have any questions, please feel free to contact Valerie Shuford, Director of Conferences, at (703)-658-1529. vshuford@noblenatl.org

Sincerely,

Dwayne A. Crawford

Executive Director

NOBLE

Click here to register

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Preliminary Agenda

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