Clemson University ranks in Top 20 in graduating African-American engineers

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Hesha N. Gamble said that as an African-American student pursuing an engineering degree, she was too often told “you can’t.”

But she did.

Gamble received bachelor’s and master’s degrees in civil engineering from Clemson University and is now Greenville County engineer, a position that has her overseeing a staff of 77 and 1,760 miles of road.

Her success is an example of what Clemson hopes to replicate with PEER, a program aimed at recruiting and retaining African-American engineering students.

The program marks a victory today as Clemson celebrates its ranking as the nation’s 20th highest producer of African-American undergraduates receiving baccalaureate degrees, according to the magazine Diverse Issues in Higher Education.

The ranking is a key benchmark because African-Americans remain underrepresented in engineering, an in-demand field with high earning potential. While African-Americans make up 13 percent of the population, they hold about 4 percent of engineering degrees, according to the National Society of Black Engineers.

Clemson’s ranking this year was up four spots from 2015 and 13 spots from 2014. When historically black universities are excluded, Clemson ranked 12th this year among predominantly white institutions.

PEER is central to Clemson’s effort to maintain forward momentum and is an acronym for Programs for Educational Enrichment and Retention.

The program offers several services, but juniors and seniors serving as mentors to freshmen and sophomores is at its heart.

Crystal Pee, a chemical engineering major from Conway, said her mentor introduced her to the Clemson chapter of the National Society of Black Engineers. She served as the chapter president, which led her to a conference in Minneapolis, where she landed an internship with a multinational food company.

Now in her fourth year at Clemson, Pee serves as a mentor to 13 other students, who sometimes tell her, “I don’t know if I can do it.”

“It’s your job to step in and say, ‘You can do it,’” Pee said. “We have resources. You’re their parent when you need to be. You’re their friend when you need to be.”

Serita Acker, the director of PEER and the related program WISE, said the latest ranking highlights the effectiveness of the programs offered at Clemson.

“Clemson is making strides in diversity and inclusion,” she said. “Our office has an impact on that. It’s a welcoming place. Minorities and women know they can come here and transition and become a part of the overall Clemson family.”

PEER has newly renovated offices in Freeman Hall, where students can often be found studying and socializing. The new PEER-WISE Study Hall Annex features tutoring, state-of-the art meeting space and a kitchen.

“Our rise in these rankings is a reflection of the hard work being done by many in the college and across the university to enroll and graduate an increasingly high-quality, diverse student body,” Clemson President James P. Clements said. “In order for U.S. industry to remain a global innovation leader, universities must graduate more engineers, including more minority and women engineers. Clemson is committed to addressing this national challenge through programs such as PEER.”

Gamble said that before she arrived at Clemson, she went to a magnet school in Charleston, where she was exposed to different ethnic backgrounds. But she remembers many of her classmates coming from rural, underfunded schools where nearly all of the students were African American.

“It’s not that they can’t do the work,” Gamble said. “They get thrown into the lion’s den, and they start to struggle. PEER gives us an opportunity to immediately have a support system. It covers all aspects– academic, social and everything in between.”

The 2016 rankings were based on data from the 2014-15 academic year. Clemson graduated 33 African-Americans, a 10 percent increase from the previous year.

Continue onto the Clemson University News Page to read the complete article.

5-Year-Old Drumming Prodigy Receives Scholarship Offer From HBCU

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5-Year-Old Drumming Prodigy marching in high school band playing his drums

Musical prodigies showcase their otherworldly abilities at a young age, but Jeremiah Travis is unlike anything we’ve ever seen before. And the historically black Alcorn State University apparently feels the same way, as it has offered the 5-year-old wunderkind a full band scholarship well over a decade before he even graduates high school.

USA Today reports that when he does finally graduate high school in 2032, he’ll have a home in the school’s Sounds of Dyn-O-Mite Band. “Now, to know that he is 5 and has a full scholarship made me feel so good,” his mother, Nicole Jackson, said. “I am just amazed at his playing level with him being so young.

Travis’ journey as a drummer began with beating on ABC blocks as a baby, and now the snare drummer for St. Helena College’s high school marching band is a familiar face at performances throughout Louisiana, including halftime shows for the New Orleans Pelicans. Most kids his age are playing with toys or spending their afternoons with an Xbox controller in their hands, but Travis would much rather spend his time perfecting his craft.

“He’s not a video game person,” Jackson said. “He likes to move and learn different things with drums.” Chesteron Frye, band director at St. Helena College and former student band director at Alcorn State University, took an immediate interest in Travis after spotting him drumming in the stands. “He was sitting in the stands just beating on the stands with some drumsticks and I was like, ‘Who is this little baby keep beating drum sticks in the stands?’” Frye told WAFB.

“So we told him come on over and we held the drum out, someone was holding it, and he just started going, going against the other band across the field and I was like, ‘Wow,’” Frye said.

Continue on to The Root to read the complete article.

Interland Free Game Makes the Holiday Season Fun

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Interland games

Be Internet Awesome Teaches Kids the Fundamentals of Internet Safety in an Interactive Way

Just in time for the Holidays, Interland aims to teach kids in a fun way how to stay safe online.

The Interland game is free and accessible to everyone and teaches important lessons like being careful about what kids share online, how to spot scams and protect their privacy and the importance of being respectful with others.

The four lands and their key learning objectives are:

 

Reality River

Don’t Fall for Fake.  The river that runs through Interland flows with fact and fiction. But things are not always as they seem. To cross the rapids, use your best judgement and don’t fall for the antics of the phisher lurking in these waters. Learning objectives include:

  • Understand not everything is true online.
  • Recognize the signs of a scam.
  • Understand phishing and how to report it.

Mindful Mountain

Share with Care. The mountainous town center of Interland is a place where everyone mingles and crosses paths. But you must be very intentional about what you share and with whom…information travels at the speed of light and there’s an oversharer among the Internauts you know. Learning objectives include:

  • Be mindful of what is shared and with whom.
  • Understand consequences of sharing.
  • Understand some info is extra sensitive.

Kind Kingdom

It’s cool to be kind. Vibes of all kinds are contagious—for better orInterland game with water and a boat for worse. In the sunniest corner of town, cyberbullies are running amok, spreading negativity everywhere. Block and report bullies to stop their takeover and be kind to other Internauts to restore the peaceful nature of this land. Learning objectives include:

  • The web amplifies kindness and negativity.
  • Not tolerating bullying and speaking up.
  • Block and report mean spirited behavior.

Tower of Treasure

Secure your secrets. Mayday! The Tower is unlocked, leaving the Internaut’s valuables like personal info and passwords at high risk. Outrun the hacker and build an untouchable password every step of the way…to secure your secrets once and for all. Learning objectives include:

  • Take responsibility to protect your things.
  • How to make a strong password.
  • A good password should be memorable.

Interland is currently available in English, Spanish, and Brazilian Portuguese. To access this free game visit:

https://beinternetawesome.withgoogle.com/en_us/interland

Expert Advice: Getting into an HBCU Grad School

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graduates walking in cap and gowns on HBCU campus

Need help getting accepted to an HBCU grad school? Dr. Fred Bonner—professor and endowed chair in educational leadership and counseling, and founding executive director of the Minority Achievement, Creativity and High-Ability Center at Prairie View A&M University—gives his best advice in an interview with gograd.com.

What are some of the top reason’s students should seriously look at HBCU grad schools as their best graduate option?

There are a number of reasons that HBCU graduate schools should be considered as the best option:

  1. HBCUs provide holistic nurturing. Both the academic and social needs of students are addressed by administration, faculty, and staff in the HBCU context. All too often in majority settings, students, particularly black students, must live a bifurcated existence; namely, their needs related to academic and classroom endeavors supersede their needs for mentoring and nurturing along social dimensions.
  2. Faculty in the HBCU context serve as role models and guides to assist the student to negotiate and navigate the postsecondary terrain. This mentoring and role modeling in the HBCU environment are nuanced with cultural inferences and understandings that provide a more authentic rendering of what the students are experiencing.
  3. Being in an environment where students are able to interface with like-minded peers is critical. Students are able to “see themselves” on campus—the literature is clear in stating the importance of peer mentoring and support in the postsecondary context.
  4. Students are placed in an environment in which their academic potential and success are the expectation and norm, as opposed to being viewed as an outlier.
Headshot Dr. Fred Bonner
Dr. Fred Bonner

Any tips for students on what to look for when choosing the best graduate programs at HBCUs?

Students should “do their homework” and find out how programs are ranked—they should look into the various course offerings. What are the majors and minors offered in the program of interest? Who are the faculty members in the respective colleges, schools, departments, and programs? What are their areas of expertise? How is the curriculum structured—what courses are offered and how often? Is the program a face-to-face, online, traditional, cohort-based program? What has been the program’s graduation rate? What is the graduate school graduation rate? What are graduates doing with their degrees? Are they finding employment in their intended area of focus?

Anything else you’d like to add about HBCU grad schools?

HBCU graduate schools are ‘citadels of excellence,’ and I am not surprised that the extant literature indicates that in many fields—particularly the STEM fields—more than 50 percent of the graduates and working professionals have had some educational experience in the HBCU context.

Follow Dr. Bonner’s advice, and you can make your dream of going to an HBCU grad school a reality.

Source: Reprinted with Permission by Dr. Fred Bonner

Rihanna Launches Another Big First: A Visual Autobiography

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Rihanna pictured in gold and black long dress at her book launch party

With only two months left in the year, Rihanna continues racking up a number of big wins. Recently at New York City’s revered art institution, the Guggenheim Museum, the fashion and beauty industry disrupter celebrated the release of Rihanna, the lavish large format book that features 1000 photos—many never seen before images from her days growing up in Barbados to candid moments between her global jaunts with friends and family.

As Rihanna welcomed invited guests—including many Navy fans—to the book launch, she acknowledged the book’s many contributors and artisans, including the Haas Brothers, who she said “they decided to do something this huge and dream this up with me.”

But the celebrated multihyphenate couldn’t finish her next acknowledgment after simply saying three words, “my bestie Melissa.”

The crowd erupted into thunderous applause for her long time friend Melissa Forde, who has a number of photographs featured in the book. “Thank you for these intimate images of life,” said Rihanna. “I didn’t even know the camera was here.”

She also thanked her tour photographer Dennis Leupold, who has shot a number of ESSENCE covers including Idris Elba, Taraji P. Henson and the cast of Black Panther, by calling him “a legend in his own right.”

Rihanna book is pictured opened with two pages filled with photos

And if Rihanna, which is 504 pages and weighs 15 pounds, wasn’t special enough, the artist has created three other unique editions. Already available, the Fenty x Phaidon edition, “This Sh*t is Heavy,” includes a copy of the book and a tabletop bookstand inspired by Rihanna’s hands. On November 20, the Luxury Supreme edition is signed and numbered by Rihanna and a “Drippy + The Brain” gold toned bookstand covered with a bespoke black vermiculated fabric (together it weighs 126 pounds). Lastly, the Ultra Luxury Supreme edition, entitled “Stoner,” includes a Portugal marble pedestal.

Rihanna will be available on October 24.

Continue on to Essence to read the complete article.

Meet NBMBAA’s New President & CEO: Kay Wallace

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Kay Wallace of the National Black MBA Association stands with a dress suit on in front of a NBMBAA logo filled canvas for picture taking

Kay Wallace lives by the quote, “Results. Period.” The new president and CEO of the National Black MBA Association—which just held its 41st Annual Conference and Exposition in Houston, Texas—is all about achieving results.

Black EOE Journal attended the action-packed conference in September and had the pleasure of speaking with Wallace about her goals as new president of NBMBAA.

Tell us about your background and how you became the new president of NBMBAA.
I have a degree in chemical engineering from the University of Alabama and a Master’s in Business Administration from Harvard Business School. My experience is in strategy and operations. I was the deputy chief operating officer of the Atlanta Olympic Games, and worked for Coca-Cola in South Africa after the fall of apartheid. I’ve worked for McKinsey & Company and Dow Chemical, have had experiences inside and outside of the U.S., and have worked for nonprofit startups, which is all part of my background before coming to National Black MBA.

What are your goals for NBMBAA, now that you’re the new president?
Meeting the needs of our 16,000 members is [goal] number one. That we’re providing products, services and programs that are relevant to them. We are always engaging in conversations with them, about what they need and what will be of value to them. Number two—the organization is going into our 50th anniversary next year, and we want to make sure that not only do we celebrate where we’ve been, but we also take that same celebration to where we’re going. That is part of my vision for the organization— to be clear about what we’re going to do to make sure there are more black people in corporate America, that there are more entrepreneurs and that we are also building and retaining wealth within black families. Education, development and wealth generation—those are three parts of our mission that we’ve been focusing on in the last 50 years and will continue to do so.

Why do you think it’s important for students to join NBMBAA?
Fifty years ago, this organization was created out of a need. That need still exists today because in a lot of places in corporate America, there’s still very few of us, meaning black people. Students should look into joining this organization because it is made up of people who have been where you’re going. Some of them are still there, so they can provide the same things to you. Students can network with people who know and understand what they may experience. Then bring together those experiences for professional development. You can do it at your chapter and then nationally when we come together for Conference, where you are going to meet thousands of people like yourself—that is very powerful.

What advice would you give to a student looking for their next job or career at the expo?
The first question I would have to ask is, “What is your vision? What do you want?” Because what has to be talked about is within the context of what their desires are. Once I understand that, I’ll be looking at the 170 companies on the career floor that can provide opportunities to meet their needs. Sometimes we find that students will be thinking about their major, but not all the companies they can work for are based on their degree. They may have their sights set on a particular industry, like a marketing company. A student may say, “I’m in marketing, I want to work for Coca-Cola, or I want to work for Pepsi.” But when you broaden their vision to understand that there’s marketing in everything, all of a sudden, companies out of the 170 that they weren’t considering, they [now] realize they can interview there. I would then ask them, “Is there an entrepreneurial opportunity for you here? If your vision is to own your own company, then think about what’s the best company to work for, that will allow you to learn while you’re there so you’re able to start your own without starting from scratch.”

To learn about the National Black MBA Association, visit nbmbaa.org

PepsiCo Beverages North America & ESSENCE Launch “She Got Now” Multi-Tiered Platform Celebrating

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Students graduating university waving

PepsiCo Beverages North America, in partnership with ESSENCE, recently introduced “She Got Now” – a multi-tiered platform that celebrates, supports and honors young Black women aspiring to and attending Historically Black Colleges and Universities (HBCUs) across the country.

The platform launch will commence with a multi-campus tour honoring the homecoming traditions unique to four major HBCUs, culminating with the inaugural Allen McKellar Jr. Internship Program, named in honor of one of the first Black professionals to enter the corporate workforce, through a job at PepsiCo.

“We are honored to partner with ESSENCE to launch ‘She Got Now,’ a platform that celebrates the innate entrepreneurial spirit of young Black women and shines the spotlight on the fantastic culture of our nation’s top HBCUs,” said Hampton University graduate, Derek Lewis, President, South Division, PepsiCo Beverages North America. “To be able to honor PepsiCo’s very own Allen McKellar Jr., a remarkable individual in Black history, who reflects the values and ideals PepsiCo still holds today, and simultaneously honor these young women is incredibly special.”

“For generations, HBCUs have served Black students – particularly Black women – having graduated trailblazing women from Oprah Winfrey to Alice Walker. As today’s student body builds upon this legacy, we are excited to continue to empower the next group of emerging leaders,” noted Michelle Ebanks, Chief Executive Officer, ESSENCE Communications. “‘She Got Now’ will serve as an extension of ESSENCE’s nearly 50-year mission to celebrate and support Black women; and together, with PepsiCo, we will continue to deepen this commitment.”

The “She Got Now” platform came to life with a multi-campus tour at Florida A&M University, followed by stops at Howard University on October 12, Hampton University on October 26 and the last stop at Norfolk State University on November 2. The tour will feature top DJs, and battle of the band competitions between opposing marching bands where fans can vote on who wins. Each stop will be hosted by Doug E. Fresh and feature a bevy of today’s stars across music and entertainment, including Saweetie, Gia Peppers, Rotimi, Terence J, Scottie Beam and DJ Envy.

Starting mid-November, the “She Got Now” Allen McKellar Jr. Internship Program will be open to all young Black women aspiring to or attending one of the participating HBCUs. Applicants should follow Pepsi’s and ESSENCE’s Twitter pages for more information and updates on “She Got Now” platform.

About PepsiCo:
PepsiCo products are enjoyed by consumers more than one billion times a day in more than 200 countries and territories around the world. PepsiCo generated more than $64 billion in net revenue in 2018, driven by a complementary food and beverage portfolio that includes Frito-Lay, Gatorade, Pepsi-Cola, Quaker and Tropicana. PepsiCo’s product portfolio includes a wide range of enjoyable foods and beverages, including 22 brands that generate more than $1 billion each in estimated annual retail sales.

Guiding PepsiCo is our vision to Be the Global Leader in Convenient Foods and Beverages by Winning with Purpose. “Winning with Purpose” reflects our ambition to win sustainably in the marketplace and embed purpose into all aspects of the business. For more information, visit www.pepsico.com.

About Essence Communications Inc.
Essence Communications is the number one media, technology and commerce company dedicated to Black women and inspires a global audience of more than 20.2 million through diverse storytelling and immersive original content. With a multi-platform presence in publishing, experiential and online, ESSENCE encompasses its signature magazine; digital, video and social platforms; television specials; books; as well as live events, including Black Women in Music, Black Women in Hollywood, Street Style and the ESSENCE Festival. Essence Communications is owned by Essence Ventures, an independent Black-owned, technology-driven company focused on merging content, community and commerce to meet the evolving cultural and lifestyle needs of people of color.

 

SOURCE PepsiCo Beverages North America

UNCF’s 17th Annual Maya Angelou Women Who Lead Luncheon Raises Record-Breaking $2.3 Million Dollars

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UNCF event 2019

Keynote Speaker Oprah Winfrey Announced $1,149,000 Matching Donation for Deserving Students and Historically Black Colleges and Universities.

Celebrating 75 years of service to the nation, more than 1,000 guests adorned with fascinators and hats attended UNCF’s (United Negro College Fund) sold-out 17th annual Maya Angelou Women Who Lead Luncheon Sept. 28 in Charlotte, raising a record-breaking $2,300,000 in support of education. Global media leader, producer, actress and philanthropist Oprah Winfrey headlined the signature fundraising event presented by Wells Fargo and bestowed an unrivaled moment by matching live fundraising efforts to donate $1,149,000 million.

Named after loyal UNCF supporter, the late Dr. Maya Angelou, the luncheon annually honors local women whose footprints positively impact the Charlotte regional community. Proceeds from the luncheon will be used to benefit students in North Carolina and the historically black colleges and universities (HBCUs) that educate them.

“I believe in the power of education,” said Oprah Winfrey. “There is nothing better than to open the door for someone.”

“The smashing success of this event is due in large part to the dedication of committee members and volunteers, led by Tiffany Jones, our local area development director, and event co-chairs Tina Bonner-Henry and Sonja P. Nichols,” said Michael L. Lomax, president and CEO,UNCF.  Both Tina Bonner-Henry and Sonja P. Nichols (Florida A&M University) have co-chaired the luncheon for the last 3 years. Bonner-Henry’s special friendship with Winfrey secured her participation. “Oprah Winfrey’s record-breaking gift will be life-changing for our students and the historically black colleges and universities that serve them, continued Lomax, president and CEO, UNCF. “With her investment, we can continue to provide the resources our HBCUs need to do their invaluable work. We can fund scholarships that narrow the gap between college costs and family resources, and change the narrative of our HBCUs, who help strengthen and elevate a new generation of young, black and gifted students.”

“Words cannot express our gratitude to Ms. Winfrey,” said Jones. “Her inspiring words reminded us that we stand on the shoulders of many and our legacy isn’t based on one action. With her generous gift, we can secure better futures for Charlotte’s brightest students and that raises the bar for us all.”

North Carolina’s black female powerhouses came out in droves to support UNCF’s work, including U.S. Rep. Alma Adams (North Carolina A&T University alumna), Charlotte Mayor Vi Lyles, Chief Justice Cheri Beasley and Kristi Jones (North Carolina Central University alumna), chief of staff to Gov. Roy Cooper.

Other key attendees included Georgette Dixon (Tennessee State University), Senior Director of External Relations for National Constituents, Wells Fargo and founding luncheon member and North Carolina UNCF-member presidents Clarence D. Armbrister, Johnson C. Smith University; Dr. Paulette Dillard, Shaw University; and Dr. Jimmy Jenkins, Livingstone College. This year’s Women Who Lead honorees were Madelyn Caple, Western region managing director, Wells Fargo Private Bank; Tish Guerin, director of player wellness, Carolina Panthers; Tiffany Eubanks-Saunders, market executive, Bank of America; and Joan H. Zimmerman, CEO, Southern Shows.

Media Maven Cherise Belnavis emceed the sold-out affair, which featured shopping, entertainment provided by Johnson C. Smith University’s jazz ensemble, Harvey Cummings Trio and national recording artist Maria Howell; event favorite, the Hatitude competition, and student testimonials from Taylor Barnes, Miss UNCF; Imani and Cierra Graham, Bennett College alums and McKenzie Estep, sophomore at local member-school St. Augustine’s University.

Estep’s powerful testimony, including a quote from Avinash Gupta “Don’t let your life change your goals, because achieving your goals can change your life,” brought the audience to their feet. Estep continued, “It is through the power and lesson of these words that inspired me to overcome adversity and become a first-generation college student.” Inspired by Estep’s words, Kieth Cockrell, Head of Specialty Client Services, Bank of America and wife Serena Peltier Cockrell (Dillard graduate) told the sophomore “We got you,” and paid off her semester’s balance before the end of the event.

The event was made possible with support from presenting sponsor Wells Fargo; platinum sponsor, Bank of America; gold sponsors, Atrium Health, Duke Energy, Lowe’s Home Improvement and Novant Health; and individual supporters, including long-standing UNCF supporters Tina Bonner-Henry and Kevin Henry, the Joan H. Zimmerman Trust and many others.

“Wells Fargo has served as presenting sponsor of the Maya Angelou Women Who Lead Luncheon for the past eight years,” said Jay Everette, senior community relations manager, Wells Fargo. “At Wells Fargo, we understand the importance of UNCF’s mission and programming, and we support it in important ways. The Wells Fargo Foundation provides more than $1 million in funding annually to support UNCF scholarships and specific student programming. We sponsor the national UNCF Empower Me Tour to help students understand what it takes to get to and through college successfully. We have Wells Fargo senior leadership representation on UNCF’s national board, and many of our Wells Fargo team members provide human capital to UNCF in regional chapters across the country.”

Source: UNCF.org

MBA Salaries in the U.S. Highest on Record

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African American woemn graduationg college with her cap and gown on

Recent graduates with an advanced business degree, particularly in the United States, are procuring substantial starting salaries. The median annual base starting salary U.S. employers plan to offer new MBA hires is $115,000—more than double the median for new bachelor’s degree hires ($55,000) and the highest ever recorded in the United States.

By industry among U.S. employers, median MBA starting salaries are highest in the consulting ($135,000) and finance/accounting ($125,000) industries.

“Employers clearly place a high value on acquiring MBA and business master’s graduates,” said Sangeet Chowfla, president and CEO of GMAC. “We are seeing a highly active candidate marketplace in terms of geographical shifts in study destinations, but the value that both employers and graduates see in an advanced business degree is a constant.”

Overall, most employers have increased MBA starting salaries (56 percent), including 63 percent of Asia-Pacific employers, 56 percent of U.S. employers, and 49 percent of European employers. Median annual base starting salaries vary considerably by world region. European companies plan to offer new MBA hires $95,000, and the median for Asia-Pacific companies is $45,000.

Source: globenewswire.com

HBCU Early Career Insights Program at TIAA

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Group of HBCU students gathered for a picture

TIAA welcomed 13 east coast Historically Black Colleges and Universities (HBCUs) to its Charlotte campus in a special learning and networking opportunity for students, faculty, administrators and staff.

TIAA’s commitment to HBCUs began in 1918, and the relationship continues to flourish today with the inaugural Early Career Insights Program. It is important that, together, we foster engagement, build relationships and share knowledge across our organizations.

Over two days, HBCU attendees participated in a “Fireside chat” with TIAA CEO Roger W. Ferguson, Jr., and heard from other senior leaders including TIAA Financial Solutions CEO Lori Dickerson Fouché, Chief Human Resources Officer Sean Woodroffe, and Chief Inclusion and Diversity Officer Corie Pauling. North Carolina A&T Chancellor Harold Lee Martin, Sr. delivered an insightful and inspiring keynote address.

Students received tips about interviewing in the digital age, listened to advice on getting their first corporate job and listened to an internship insights panel. Administrators, faculty, and staff listened to tips to achieve financial success, gained innovative ideas for inclusion and diversity, and learned how Business Resource Groups can become strategic business partners.

TIAA recognizes the critical role HBCUs play in American higher education. More than half of all African American professionals are graduates of HBCUs, of the top ten colleges for African Americans who go on to earn Ph.D.s, nine of these colleges are HBCUs, and in engineering, technology, math and science, HBCUs turn out 25 percent of African American undergraduates.

“We recognize that this is a time of challenge and transformation for HBCUs – as it is for all of higher education – and our goal is to help HBCUs remain strong and vital to continue fulfilling their mission for the benefit of generations to come,” said Roger W. Ferguson, Jr., CEO, TIAA.

Photo credit: Fusion Photography

Alpha Kappa Alpha Sorority Successfully Raises $1 Million in Support of HBCUs

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black woman college graduate outside with graduation cap on smiling

Alpha Kappa Alpha Sorority, Incorporated is proud to announce that for the second consecutive year, the sorority has successfully raised $1 million for the benefit of Historically Black Colleges and Universities (HBCUs) as part of its HBCU Impact Day initiative.

On Monday, September 16, local chapters, private donors and corporate matching dollars from across the globe helped the 111-year old service organization reach the $1 million fundraising goal.

“Once again this is a historic moment for Alpha Kappa Alpha, as we have raised $1 million for HBCUs for the second year in a row,” AKA International President Glenda Glover shared with excitement in a video message to sorority members.

“I want to thank everyone who contributed to this $1 million, one-day campaign. Let’s continue to support our HBCUs.”

“HBCUs are critically important educational institutions. Alpha Kappa Alpha was founded at an HBCU more than 100 years ago, so it is not only befitting but necessary that AKA women are at the forefront of investing in the future of these spaces,” added Dr. Glover, who is also president of Tennessee State University, and an HBCU graduate.

In February 2019, AKA gifted $1.6 million to the first 32 of 96 HBCUs through the AKA-HBCU Endowment Fund. The second cycle, consisting of 32 more HBCUs, will be funded in 2020. The endowment fund falls under the organization’s target HBCU for Life: A Call to Action, which aims to promote HBCUs by encouraging students to attend and matriculate through these institutions.

HBCU Impact Day is one component of a four-year $10 million fundraising goal set by AKA International President Dr. Glenda Glover, who challenged the women of AKA to lead the charge in helping to secure fiscal sustainability and success for all four-year accredited HBCUs around the country.

Although HBCU Impact Day has passed, individuals or organizations interested in supporting the effort can still make contributions by texting AKAHBCU to 44321, giving by mail or online at aka1908.com/hbcus/donate-hbcu. Money raised through AKA’s HBCU campaign will assist in providing financial support to these schools over the next three years. Endowment funds can help schools reduce student debt through scholarships, fund industry-specific research, recruit and retain top faculty, and much more.

For more information on the sorority’s commitment to HBCUs, visit AKA’s online pressroom at www.AKA1908.com/news-events/.

About Alpha Kappa Alpha Sorority, Incorporated®
Alpha Kappa Alpha Sorority, Incorporated (AKA) is an international service organization that was founded on the campus of Howard University in Washington, D.C. in 1908. It is the oldest Greek-letter organization established by African-American college-educated women. Alpha Kappa Alpha is comprised of nearly 300,000 members in more than 1,000 graduate and undergraduate chapters in the United States, the U.S. Virgin Islands, Liberia, the Bahamas, Bermuda, the Caribbean, Canada, Japan, Germany, South Korea, South Africa, and in the Middle East.  Led by International President Glenda Glover, PhD., Alpha Kappa Alpha Sorority is often hailed as “America’s premier Greek-letter organization for African-American women.” For more information on Alpha Kappa Alpha Sorority and its programs, log onto AKA1908.com.

National Black MBA Association’s 41st Annual Conference & Exposition Coming September 24-28

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NBMBAA 2019 Conference

NBMBAA’s 41st Annual Conference & Exposition is the premier conference for today’s black professionals.

The Annual NBMBAA Conference & Exposition convenes members, corporate and university partners, and some of the world’s most sought after thought leaders at the George R. Brown Convention Center for a week of exploration in the areas of education, leadership, career opportunities, and networking connections that enable professional development.

More than 10,000 professionals will travel to Houston September 24-28 to gain access to opportunities that only this national conference can offer. Will you be one of them?

The National Black MBA Association mission is to help promote educational and economic enrichment to students and professionals. The 41st Annual NBMBAA Conference and Exposition hosted in Houston, Texas will focus on the power that each member possesses to control their professional destiny through focused planning and preparation.

The conference tracks will be aligned to address leadership competencies needed to accomplish career goals and objectives. In addition, workshops and breakout sessions will provide key insights and learnings aligned with challenges that members are experiencing in corporate America.

Each member will leave the 41st Annual NBMBAA® Conference and Exposition empowered to lead the planning and execution of a powerful future and equipped to succeed by garnering powerful tips, tools and resources. Don’t miss the opportunity to attend one of the most powerful NBMBAA conferences yet!

For more information, visit nbmbaa.org/conference/ .

40th College Television Awards Submission Period Begins Sept. 5

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The Television Academy Foundation Awards Ceremony Celebrates Student-Produced Programs From Colleges Nationwide. The submission period for the Television Academy Foundation’s 40th College Television Awards is Sept. 5 through Oct. 3, 2019.

Each year hundreds of graduate and undergraduate students, representing colleges and universities nationwide, submit their media projects to television’s most prestigious student competition—the Television Academy Foundation’s College Television Awards.

The College Television Awards honors achievement in student-produced programs and will feature stars from today’s top television shows presenting awards to winners at the red-carpet awards ceremony.

Emulating the Emmy® Awards selection process, entries for the College Television Awards are judged by Television Academy members. Top honors and a $3,000 cash prize will be presented to winning teams in eight categories: drama, comedy, animation, nonfiction, promotional, news, sports and variety. The College Television Awards also includes two additional, donor-supported, categories: the Seymour Bricker Humanitarian Award and the Loreen Arbus Focus on Disability Scholarship.

In addition to the awards ceremony, the nominees will take part in a three-day television summit hosted by the Television Academy Foundation. The summit, designed to enhance professional development, will feature panel discussions, studio tours and networking opportunities with industry executives and Academy members.

The College Television Awards often serves as an entry point for a career in television for nominees and winners. Past alumni have worked as editors, writers, producers and other positions on programs including Ray Donovan, The Handmaid’s Tale, Tom Clancy’s Jack Ryan, CBS This Morning, Unbreakable Kimmy Schmidt, Grey’s Anatomy, 60 Minutes, Empire and many more.

For additional information, visit TelevisionAcademy.com/CTA.

To read the complete article continue on to The Patch.

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